An Explanation Of Generation Y By Matthew Coppola


OMG. IM ROFLMAO ATM. BTW I G2G but ill BRB.If your not up with the lingo I just said Oh my goodness. Im Rollling over Laughing my ass off. I got to go but ill be right back. Today im going to be talking about the generation that talks like that.Known for their optimistic attitudes, aspirations for higher education, ability to work collaboratively, their open-mindedness, and drive, Generation Y are here. And they are making a statement.They are tech-savvy, travel-mad, self-absorbed, peer-pressured, celebrity-obsessed, Facebook-compulsive, iPod-wearing, brand-conscious 20-somethings who live with their parents and show no loyalty to their employer THEY’RE supposed to be hip, smart-talking, and sometimes seem to suffer from an overdose of self esteem. With a BlackBerry in one hand, half-caf latte in the other and an iPod-plugged earphones surgically attached to ears, they are ambitious, demanding and apparently born to rule. Right now!They are Generation Y and there are more than four and a half million of them in Australia.

You could also call them the internet generation, echo boomers, igeneration, the mypod generation or the millinials. They have become almost a household name!

The exact years are a subject of debate however I can provide some insight into the reason why Generation Y do what they do.

Now if another Generation provided this information it may be how they are viewed from the outside. Today I would like to give you some of the inside scoop for Gen Y.

So what makes them tick? How do we recruit them? More importantly, how do we retain them?

Firstly well look at what factors influence this generation, so we understand where they are coming from.

COMPARING GENERATIONS

Baby Boomers were influenced by the dawn of the TV, Rock and Roll, the Cold War, Vietnam War, the danger of nuclear war. Xers saw the Personal Computer, AIDS, single parent families, the growth in multiculturalism, and the downsizing of companies.

Gen Y have lived through the age of the internet, cable television, globalisation, September 11 and environmentalism

PEER PRESSURE

Unlike previous generations before them, peer pressure has become a major influence on Gen Y.
They wont listen to the media and are less likely to listen to their parents. But they will listen to their friends.

Unlike the pen-pal relationship that teens of the 1970s enjoyed, Gen Y no longer need to wait for letters in transit.

Gen Y are also communicating with one another using different communication mediums than previous generations. Instant messaging technologies and mobile phones have become very popular with Gen Y.

Online communication affords instant gratification for the users involved. Messages appear on the screen mere seconds after they are posted, allowing conversation-style communication between friends.

TECHNOLOGY

Ask any Gen Y What/who has a lot of influence on your thinking and behaviour? and most of them will likely say TV and movies.

Research shows that Aussie teenagers are now spending more time watching TV today then compared to four years ago, up from 2 hours 16 minutes per day to 2 hours and 20 minutes, a growth of 3.6%.

In addition to the growing Internet and video games use, they are now approaching 4 hours screen time per day.

Ease of access to a computer with internet connection and portable devices such as IPhones which can connect to the internet mean that Gen Y spend a great deal of time online and on social networking mediums such as facebook.

SOCIAL, ECONOMIC & POLITICAL CONDITIONS

Gen Y have also experienced different economic, social and political conditions than previous generations. Before the financial crisis occurred, most Aussie gen Ys had no idea what impact a recession has on society.
Which partly explains why most of Gen Y are still living at home.

Although they are the most materially endowed, and entertained generation of teenagers ever, they have been seriously affected by the economic climate.

Economic crises, including the dot-com bubble in 2000, and the United States housing bubble that resulted in the financial crisis have made paying any rent, hard for this generation riddled with high unemployment levels.

Theyve also seen the costs of their parents success in terms of broken marriages, absentee parenting, and an epidemic of stress related illnesses.

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Author: Matthew Coppola - Career Coach, Employment Specialist and Professional CV Writer

Holding a graduate degree in Commerce, majoring in Economics at Curtin University, as well as a post graduate certificate in Career Education and Development at RMIT University, Matthew brings with him many years of experience working in the fields of business development, marketing, soft-skills training and employment services industry. He has gained significant exposure in working with employers in sourcing staff as well as assisting jobseekers in promoting and marketing themselves to employers and securing sustainable employment outcomes. He is currently working in Disability Employment Services where he assists clients with mental health disabilities in finding and keeping satisfying and gainful employment and helping them overcome and work around barriers to employment. He has helped many job seekers secure employment by training and coaching them in the art of being interviewed and giving the interviewer a positive and lasting impression. He knows how to sell and market a job seeker to an employer and he imparts this knowledge to his clients in helping them sell and market themselves in an interview. Matthew regularly writes new articles on a variety of employment related topics and posts these to his personal website blog matthewcoppola.com