Australia’s specialist in etiquette training: Auersmont School of Etiquette


#etiquette
#etiquettetraining
#etiquettespecialist

I recently chatted with Elizabeth Soos, consultant and principal of Auersmont School of Etiquette. 

Auersmont is a boutique etiquette consultancy firm that provides professional advice and expert knowledge in the world of etiquette, social conventions and good manners.

Prestigious British etiquette educators, Emma Dupont in London and Paris and Shanghai-based etiquette and service consultant, Guillaume Rue de Bernadac at Academie de Bernadac, trained Elizabeth.

Her training, coupled with a European background and extensive knowledge in cross-cultural issues, has enabled her to build Auersmont School of Etiquette to what it is today.

Elizabeth believes that it is crucial to start with etiquette in the formative years of a child’s life, setting them in good stead for the future in their adult years.

The courses that Elizabeth provides at Auersmont School of Etiquette have been tailored to match etiquette to the needs of all ages, from children to teens and adults.

She has even devised specific training for business professionals and those newly entering the workforce. One of her speciality subjects is Interviewing Etiquette.  At any age, applying for work and attending an interview can seem daunting,  so this course that she offers will guide you through the interview process to be prepared and equipped.

Visit their website today at https://auersmont.com.au.

 

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Matthew Coppola, Client Centric

About marketing services offered by Client Centric


Client Centric offer a range of marketing services for companies.

These include:

The range of marketing services offered by Client Centric are aimed about helping businesses of all sizes to present and highlight their services and/or products in an attractive, presentable and engaging format, both in print and digital forms.

Who would benefit from the various marketing services on offer?

Marketing professionals and sales people may benefit from having some great materials and resources that they can use to bring to business meetings with potential or existing clientele. The materials can also be used by management staff when holding conferences.

Do they use templates?

No. Although they have their own style of design, they create every piece of marketing marketing material from the ground up.

How do I make contact with Client Centric?

Visit their website at: www.clientcentric.com.au

One of their friendly team will be happy to attend to your requirements and provide you with an appropriate quote.

 

Responding to the interview question: “What do you look for in a job?” By Matthew Coppola


What do you look for in a job?

Asking this question provides the interviewer with insight and understanding of what it is that you are after in a job and what is going to motivate you to stay and put forth your best effort.

By finding out what you look for in a job, the interviewer can then compare that with what they have on offer and to see if it matches up with what you want.

My suggestion is to be genuine and sincere about what you are looking for in a job. You can the finish up your answer by mentioning about how you feel that the job you are being interviewed for will meet your expectations and requirements in a position.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

Responding to the interview question: “What made you apply for this role” By Matthew Coppola


What made you apply for this role?

With this question, the interviewer is trying to determine your reasons for applying and what exactly drew you to the position they have advertised.

In responding to this question, my suggestion is to talk about the role, what really interests you and why the role meets your search criteria for a job.


 


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “How well do you handle stress?” By Matthew Coppola


How well do you handle stress?

Stress in the workplace is unavoidable.

By definition, it’s that emotional strain and pressure that comes with demanding circumstances. We may feel pressured at times, but being stressed at work is the next level, and it’s not nice to go through.

The interviewer is just trying to ascertain what your coping mechanisms are when it comes to stress at work and how well you handle it. The employer may know that the job at times is very stressful, and so they want to make sure that you have coping mechanisms in place to get through stressful periods at work.

My suggestion is first to start talking about stress in the workplace, how it is unavoidable, why stress can occur in the workplace, why it’s not good to let stress get the better of us and what our resolve should be.

Now this introductory comment doesn’t need to be long-winded and extensive. Keep it brief and to the point.

After you have made your introductory comment, then talk about the techniques and strategies that you implement to cope with and manage stress as best you can.

But my biggest suggestion is not to come across that you are immune to stress. Sure, some of us cope better than others. But the person interviewing you may feel that stress is tough to manage, and in asking you the question, they may, subconsciously, appreciate the way you deal with stress and something they can think about.

And also too, if you come across that stress is non-existent to you, they may not believe you, even if there is some degree of truth to that.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “How would your peers describe you?” By Matthew Coppola


How would your peers describe you?

Asking this question to an interviewee provides the employer with an insight from the candidate’s perspective on how their friends and peers see them, providing some kind of indication on what kind of person they are and what they will be like in the workplace.

When trying to find someone for the best fit for the team, asking this question is a good starting point.

My suggestion is to talk about the most positive, up building points that your peers would say about you and then explain why they would say those things.

Just saying that your peers think your the best person to go to when problems arise may not come across genuine, but backing it up with an example or further explanation will help create some kind of verification to what you are saying.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “What is your best accomplishment to date?” By Matthew Coppola


What is your best accomplishment to date?

This is a question asked by an interviewer to find out something in your career thus far that you are most proud of and an achievement that can show the kind of person you are in the workplace.

Indeed, an individual’s achievements say much about who they are. The same goes for helping to determine the right person for the job.

When responding to this question, my suggestion is to either bring up your best accomplishment, providing details of employer/job/role/outcome, or, if you have multiple achievements and you just can’t pick one, choose to either say a couple great achievements or pick the one most relevant to the job you are being interviewed for.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “Why are you leaving your current position?” By Matthew Coppola


Why are you leaving your current position?

There are many reasons why someone would leave their job.

They may have been made redundant, left for personal reasons or lost their job either for performance reasons or did not pass the probation period. Whatever the reason is (There could be so many reasons) this question usually comes up in an interview.

WHY IS THIS QUESTION ASKED

The employer/recruiter wants to know why you left your job because it’s a fair question and they want to be aware of your intentions and reasons for applying.

You may however decide not to tell them the real reason why you left. You may feel that they will think negatively of you or that you may lose the opportunity to secure the job because of your reason/s for leaving.

This is indeed a tricky question.

You may decide to be upfront and honest about your real reasons for leaving.

Or, you could approach the question the following way:

  • Explaining that you left for personal reasons, but then conclude by talking about the positive points of your experience, what you learnt and how you are ready to now take the next step in your career.

By taking this approach, no specific reason is provided but the prospective employer sees that you are positive about it all and just wanting to progress and move forward.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “Why do you want this job?” By Matthew Coppola


Why do you want this job?

Fairly straight forward question, right?

For most people, the real reason why they want the job may not be exactly what they decide is appropriate in the interview to say.

How so?

Some of the real reasons for wanting the job are:

  • Unemployed – need to pay the bills and so having a job is high priority. 
  • More money/higher income and greater job challenges.
  • To be involved and part of the work force.
  • Really need a job to sustain a certain lifestyle.
  • Desire to be industrious, hard working and busy.

I have highlighted the main reasons which I believe are the most common.

But should you prefer to provide another reason other then what I have listed above, you may opt to say the following:

  • Role really interests me and is exactly what I am looking for to make next step in my career.
  • As much as I have thoroughly enjoyed my time in my currently role, I feel now after ____ years, I am ready for a change.
  • Since being made redundant/leaving my last role, I have been actively searching for work. This job is precisely what I am seeking.

Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Dealing with nerves during a job interview, by Matthew Coppola


When conducting interview coaching, I am often asked by individuals about how they can deal with their nerves during a job interview.

They feel that that they get so nervous and flustered, that they forget what to say, have a ‘mental blank’ and end up either saying something brief and short, or talking extensively around the question.
 
Then, they feel what they have said isn’t right and start to question what the prospective employer will think of them besides what is written in the resume.
 
Has this ever happened to you?
 
Indeed, this has certainly happened to me, as you can read here.
 
Below is a list of my suggestions on how you may be able to better cope with those nerves during the interview:
 
  • Have an introduction to your response, finishing it off with a concluding remark.
  • If you have a glass of water in front of you, take regular sips before responding.
  • Slow down your responses – don’t feel you need to rush your answer.
  • Emphasise certain points, stress certain parts of what you are saying, then take a pause – this helps buy you some breathing space and will also encourage them to really meditate and digest on what you are saying and trying to get across.
  • Thoroughly prepare, prepare, prepare for your interview before hand.
  • Get an early nights rest before the day of your interview.
  • Arrive early to the employer’s location and take the time to sit down and relax.
  • Read through the job description before your interview and really think about how your skills and experience match with what they are asking for. By having a good understanding of what they are after, you will hopefully feel more confident in yourself and feel less of a surprise when questions are asked of you.
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If you are interested in receiving interview skills coaching, please do not hesitate to contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be very happy to help.
 

About employment services from Client Centric for Defence Force members and their partners, by Matthew Coppola


Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions offers a special tailored and expert service for members of the Australian Defence Force needing help transitioning into the civilian workforce and require a demilitarised resume and cover letter.

The range of tailored services that they offer to help individuals transition out of the army, navy or airforce include:

  • Professionally Written CV/Resume
  • Targeted Cover Letters
  • Interview Skills Coaching 
  • Revamped LinkedInTM profiles

​Their services are designed to market and promote an individual’s skills, experience and training gained from their time in service (as well as prior experiences before entering service) to a prospective employer in the civilian work force. 


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in your career to date? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Link to the specific page on Client Centric’s website is: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/defence

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help.

www.clientcentric.com.au

 

How many words should my responses be to the key selection criteria? By Matthew Coppola


Article by Matthew Coppola, Client Centric 

Looking for a new job? Wanting to move on to a new role? Client Centric can help by professionally writing for you a new and tailored CV and cover letter designed to help market and promote you to prospective employers. They also provide interview coaching and assist with addressing key selection criteria. Visit their website today: www.clientcentric.com.au

So, as part of your application you need to address a set of key selection criteria. How long should your responses be?

Firstly, my suggestion is to find out if the employer/recruiter has asked for a certain number of words per response or how many pages your application should be. Will help you determine the length and size of your answers.

However, as a rule of thumb, my suggestion is to stay around 300-350 words per criteria. Or best to stay less than half a page long, with multiple paragraphs rather than a couple of long paragraphs that may be a little difficult to read.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in your career to date? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help.

www.clientcentric.com.au

 

How many pages should a cover letter be? By Matthew Coppola


The cover letter is equally as important as the resume. Although the CV summarises your skills, experience, education, personal details and references, the tailored cover letter takes the next step further to explain why you are suitable for a particular job.

So, how many pages should the cover letter be?

Unless the employer has stipulated their requirements for the length and size of the cover letter that they expect for each application, my suggestion is to stay to the general limit of a page.

However, every job application is different and it’s important to find out if the employer/recruiter has any expectations on how they would like the applications to be formatted and written.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

What size font is best suited to a resume? By Matthew Coppola


So, you want to make sure that your resume can be easily read. What size font is best suited for a resume and cover letter?

My suggestion is size 10 font for the CV, and either size 10 or size 11 font for the cover letter.

Generally speaking, most job applications are viewed online, rather then printed out and read in paper form. The reason being is that a recruiter/employer may receive hundreds of applications. In the interests of saving paper/environmental sustainability and cost reduction (costs in paper and ink), they may opt to just view the application documents online.

Viewing documents on a computer screen allows you to expand and zoom in on the document, depending on the reader’s preference.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Why we should never worry about candidates vying for the same job, by Matthew Coppola


Many individuals going for a job interview worry about the other candidates who will be interviewed too – thinking about what their competition is. But there is a good reason for not worrying and thinking about the other candidates vying for the same position.

With a small business, studies say to not worry about the competition and what they are doing. Yes, it is essential to be aware of what they do and what they charge, but not to worry about them.

The reason for this is that it distracts the business owner. It may cause discouragement, and instead of the attention going toward continual innovation and business improvement, the focus is going to the competition.

So the same goes for being interviewed. Don’t worry about the other candidates, and instead focus on what you have that makes you a valuable candidate for the role and how you can make a meaningful contribution.

So go into that interview with your head held high, confident that you can do the role and that they will want to hire you.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au