About employment services from Client Centric for Defence Force members and their partners, by Matthew Coppola


Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions offers a special tailored and expert service for members of the Australian Defence Force needing help transitioning into the civilian workforce and require a demilitarised resume and cover letter.

The range of tailored services that they offer to help individuals transition out of the army, navy or airforce include:

  • Professionally Written CV/Resume
  • Targeted Cover Letters
  • Interview Skills Coaching 
  • Revamped LinkedInTM profiles

​Their services are designed to market and promote an individual’s skills, experience and training gained from their time in service (as well as prior experiences before entering service) to a prospective employer in the civilian work force. 


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in your career to date? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Link to the specific page on Client Centric’s website is: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/defence

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help.

www.clientcentric.com.au

 

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How many words should my responses be to the key selection criteria? By Matthew Coppola


So, as part of your application you need to address a set of key selection criteria. How long should your responses be?

Firstly, my suggestion is to find out if the employer/recruiter has asked for a certain number of words per response or how many pages your application should be. Will help you determine the length and size of your answers.

However, as a rule of thumb, my suggestion is to stay around 300-350 words per criteria. Or best to stay less than half a page long, with multiple paragraphs rather than a couple of long paragraphs that may be a little difficult to read.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in your career to date? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help.

www.clientcentric.com.au

 

How many pages should a cover letter be? By Matthew Coppola


The cover letter is equally as important as the resume. Although the CV summarises your skills, experience, education, personal details and references, the tailored cover letter takes the next step further to explain why you are suitable for a particular job.

So, how many pages should the cover letter be?

Unless the employer has stipulated their requirements for the length and size of the cover letter that they expect for each application, my suggestion is to stay to the general limit of a page.

However, every job application is different and it’s important to find out if the employer/recruiter has any expectations on how they would like the applications to be formatted and written.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

What size font is best suited to a resume? By Matthew Coppola


So, you want to make sure that your resume can be easily read. What size font is best suited for a resume and cover letter?

My suggestion is size 10 font for the CV, and either size 10 or size 11 font for the cover letter.

Generally speaking, most job applications are viewed online, rather then printed out and read in paper form. The reason being is that a recruiter/employer may receive hundreds of applications. In the interests of saving paper/environmental sustainability and cost reduction (costs in paper and ink), they may opt to just view the application documents online.

Viewing documents on a computer screen allows you to expand and zoom in on the document, depending on the reader’s preference.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Why we should never worry about candidates vying for the same job, by Matthew Coppola


Many individuals going for a job interview worry about the other candidates who will be interviewed too – thinking about what their competition is. But there is a good reason for not worrying and thinking about the other candidates vying for the same position.

With a small business, studies say to not worry about the competition and what they are doing. Yes, it is essential to be aware of what they do and what they charge, but not to worry about them.

The reason for this is that it distracts the business owner. It may cause discouragement, and instead of the attention going toward continual innovation and business improvement, the focus is going to the competition.

So the same goes for being interviewed. Don’t worry about the other candidates, and instead focus on what you have that makes you a valuable candidate for the role and how you can make a meaningful contribution.

So go into that interview with your head held high, confident that you can do the role and that they will want to hire you.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

How the saying ‘dead-end job’ invokes negativity, and why it shouldn’t, by Matthew Coppola


I am sure for many of my readers, it’s happened to us or someone we know. Why does the saying ‘in a dead-end job’ invoke so much negativity? And, why shouldn’t we see it so negative?

The saying ‘dead-end job’ implies that the job has little prospect of progressing, moving forward and advancing.

It hurts because the person that is said to may not view their job that way. For example, that job pays the bills. Contributes to the overall business’ operation and the person in that job is helping in so many ways to their community, their family and their workplace.

Every job. I mean every single role is essential and necessary. That’s why it’s a job. There is a need for that person to perform that type of work and duties. Without a person in that job, things won’t get done.

Furthermore, every job that we have in our life helps us develop and gain valuable skills, qualities, traits, life-experiences and self-fulfilment about what we have accomplished.

I have fond memories of my time working in various roles in the past, which some may consider ‘dead-end’ jobs.

For example, jobs that I had before and during university taught me much about dealing and conversing with difficult people, perseverance, workload management, organisation, and so forth.

So, I firmly believe that we should never see any genuine and legitimate job as a dead-end because it may only de-motivate and discourage us from really seeing the positive points about what we are learning and developing as individuals in those jobs.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

How to deal with having a lack of industry experience, by Matthew Coppola


We’ve all heard it before. The typical response from an employer/recruiter saying that you lack industry experience. So, face with this issue, how do you deal with it?

Employers generally say this because they genuinely need someone who has experience in their industry, whether it be in the same role or a completely different position. Especially needed when a set of key selection criteria need to be addressed.

Every industry is different. Having an understanding of the industry, what the market is like, any regulations, policies or other intricacies of the industry can be very important to an employer. To them, you understand their business and their industry. They can relate better to you and discuss industry matters with you knowing full well that you have some level of familiarity with the sector that their business.

So, the question is, how do I respond to that answer?

You may decide to talk about your experience in another industry that is similar, and how it relates to their industry. But, that isn’t always easy.

The next step may be to obtain some work experience or volunteer your time in the industry that you need to gain exposure to. This may help and be beneficial to put on your resume.

Another option is to do a course/workshop/attend a conference relevant to that industry.

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Equipping yourself with a brand new tailored and personalised CV and cover letter can be a great way to improve your chances of getting noticed by a prospective employer.

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions – they have the expertise and experience to help clients from all different professions and trades, and all kinds of industries.

Visit their website today at:

www.clientcentric.com.au