Is it Okay to mention Money in an Interview?


For many, saying the word ‘money’ interview setting is a dirty word. But one begs the question, is there anything wrong with mentioning money, especially if it’s the primary reason why you’re on the job hunt?

PROPER ZOOM ETIQUETTE: HOLDING DIGITAL MEETINGS WITH ELEGANCE

To answer this question, we need to carefully consider the reasons behind why people are afraid to say money is the determining factor behind their job search efforts and for wanting to leave their current employer.

An article written by Kristin Wong from the New York Times mentions that many of us were brought up from a young age believing that money, like sex, is one of those topics that we should not bring up in a polite conversation. It’s like the conversation of money is almost taboo.

She goes on to say that forces are at play here, such as the intimidation factor and embarrassment prevent us from mention about money.

Another article by Inc entitled How to Talk Money in a Job Interview makes a good point that it’s best to ease into the topic of money in an interview setting and to know your worth.

It’s true to say money isn’t everything when it comes to the perfect job. But it does mean a great to the self-esteem and personal feeling of worth to many who feel income, or size of it, is a good measure of themself and skilfulness.

WHY LEAVING A JOB CAN BE SO HARD TO DO

Indeed, this is a personal topic, and everyone will be different. Not everyone is comfortable mentioning money in an interview.

On a personal note, I think that money is part of the whole employee-employer relationship. For your services, they provide you with money. The employer is more than willing and happy to ask YOU questions about what you can do for them. It only makes sense then that a respectful and tact conversation on money emerges as that is the return to you for your services as an employee.

Eventually, though, unless the job is a voluntary, unpaid position, money will be mentioned. It’s up to you then to have that conversation and to know what the market is paying for someone of your experience and calibre, while at the same time not being unrealistic to push the employer away because they feel that you’re too expensive.

Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions (www.clientcentric.com.au)

Is It Okay To Send A Follow Up Email After A Job Interview?


You just had a job interview with an employer and you’re feeling quite confident. Or maybe you’re freaking out, carefully considering whether or not you performed well and what you could have said differently.

Frustrated You Didn’t Hear From Back From an Employer? You’re Not Alone.

It’s a waiting game. You need to let the interview process proceed and finish. Once they have interviewed all shortlisted candidates (and let’s face it, who knows how many people they actually interviewed) then they will discuss and make a decision about who gets the job.

The problem with the whole job interview process is that you never really get to know what the employer is going to ask you and what they’re specifically looking for.

How long can it take to secure an interview?

But you may be wondering whether or not it’s okay to send a follow up email to the interviewer thanking them for their time.

Well, for many, there are mixed views on this.

I think it’s okay, but only if your email is super short and straight to the point.

Something like this:

Hi, Just a quick note to say thank you for the opportunity to be interviewed by you. Whatever the outcome may be, I look forward to hearing from you. Thanks.

So something short and sweet. No pressure whatsoever on the employer to make a decision sooner or in any way influence their decision-making. At the end of the day, you want the employer to hire you because they want you not because they felt compelled or pressured.

I believe it’s a good idea to send a follow-up email because it shows that you’re keen and enthusiastic about the job. A genuine, heart-felt show of interest can go a long way to making a difference. And of all the candidates that they may have hired, if there is any slight confusion as to hiring you over someone else, a simple email might just be the trick to push you over the edge to a yes to hiring you.

The best thing anyone can do is work on their interviewing technique. Learn about the art of the interview by receiving one-on-one interview coaching with an experienced coach will guide you and provide you with feedback. Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions offer this service and they do a great job at it.

How to deal with having a lack of industry experience, by Matthew Coppola


We’ve all heard it before. The typical response from an employer/recruiter saying that you lack industry experience. So, face with this issue, how do you deal with it?

Employers generally say this because they genuinely need someone who has experience in their industry, whether it be in the same role or a completely different position. Especially needed when a set of key selection criteria need to be addressed.

Every industry is different. Having an understanding of the industry, what the market is like, any regulations, policies or other intricacies of the industry can be very important to an employer. To them, you understand their business and their industry. They can relate better to you and discuss industry matters with you knowing full well that you have some level of familiarity with the sector that their business.

So, the question is, how do I respond to that answer?

You may decide to talk about your experience in another industry that is similar, and how it relates to their industry. But, that isn’t always easy.

The next step may be to obtain some work experience or volunteer your time in the industry that you need to gain exposure to. This may help and be beneficial to put on your resume.

Another option is to do a course/workshop/attend a conference relevant to that industry.

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Equipping yourself with a brand new tailored and personalised CV and cover letter can be a great way to improve your chances of getting noticed by a prospective employer.

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions – they have the expertise and experience to help clients from all different professions and trades, and all kinds of industries.

Visit their website today at:

www.clientcentric.com.au

How early should I arrive to an interview? By Matthew Coppola


Aim to arrive around 10 minutes early, that is, 10 minutes early from when you arrive to the reception desk. So, it would make sense then to arrive to the employer’s business site and park by about 20minutes early. That leaves enough time to find a parking spot, compose yourself, fix your suit and then walk into the front reception area.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would you like to be better prepared?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

Interview skills coaching in London and surrounding suburbs


Highlight your expertise.

Would you like help in responding with more confidence to perplexing interview questions? Do you find it a challenge at times in being able to highlight your strengths to a prospective company and clearly express why you would be a strong candidate for their team? 

An employer can ask you questions on why you are a better candidate in various ways.

It is good to know what the ideal applicant for the position is and clearly comprehend the job and how you are the perfect candidate.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. They also assist with interview skills coaching via online video link in London and surrounding suburbs. For more information, please visit:

https://www.clientcentric.com.au/londoninterviewcoaching

 Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au.

 

 

Importance of displaying positive body language in an interview setting, by Matthew Coppola


Sometimes it doesn’t matter what we say or how we say something. Because if our body language – that is our physical mannerism and stature – does not match up with what we are saying, then the message that we are trying to get across will be skewered and misinterpreted.

In fact, research suggests that our body language accounts for upwards of 90% of our communication and what we are really trying to say.

This really is why it is so important to be aware of our own body language, particularly in an interview setting where the interviewer may be reading into everything we say and do in front of them.

I will address a couple areas where we need to be mindful of our body language in an interview setting:

Face to face sitting in front of an interviewer – This can be very daunting. We might feel as though we are being interrogated and there is a bright light shining in our eyes! Okay, I am exaggerating here. But the fact of the matter is, it’s not easy being in front of another person knowing full well that they are trying to make a decision on whether to hire you or not, and it all rests upon what you say and do.

So try to have an open posture and keep your hands clasped together. Don’t fidget. And if naturally, you are someone that uses your hands when talking, try to keep this minimal and relevant to what you are saying. Try to avoid crossing your arms or resting your hands on your legs like you are ready to finish up with the interview.

Facial expressions – Don’t be afraid to smile or show facial expressions. Obviously, don’t overdo it. But show a nice smile and use your facial expressions intermittingly.

To sit back or not. To lean forward or not. What should I do?? Help! – There is nothing wrong with sitting back or leaning forward. Or doing both intermittingly in the course of the interview. Just avoid slouching and coming across disinterested. If you are trying to make a point or elaborate on something, feel free to lean forward but not too much.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au

They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching-for-melbourne

They also assist former Australian Defence personnel and their partners with their job applications into civilian employment. Further details can be found at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/defencetransition

 

 

 

Interview Question: Why do you want to work for our company?


One of the common questions an interviewer may ask concerns why you want to work for their company. It could ask be asked in another way such as, why did you apply for this role, what do you know about the company and why should we hire you.

The meaning uncovered

This is a typical question where the employer is trying to discern just how interested and keen you really are in working for them. They are looking to see how enthusiastic you really are. The employer may be interviewing 5 other candidates just like you, so they want someone who genuinely wants the role and will demonstrate this.

Difference between “enthusiastic” and “desperate”

You can come across enthusiastic by showing interest in the position, the company and the interviewer. You will come across desperate by having a great need or desire for getting the job, to the point that it goes overboard and makes the interviewer feel uncomfortable.

How you can show enthusiasm

You can show enthusiasm by asking questions about the company, saying things like “I can definitely see myself performing well in this role” or “This position is exactly what I am looking for”. Your body language will also come across that you are enthusiastic about the role and you can do this by leaning forward, nodding, smiling and maintaining eye contact.

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Author: Matthew Coppola

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Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions offers interview skills coaching and you can visit their web page by clicking here

Alternatively, if you are seeking employment and would like assistance with a new CV and Covering Letter, they also provide this service and you can view it by clicking here

This article can also be viewed here

How to prepare questions to ask at your interview, by Matthew Coppola


SBeing asked questions at an interview can be like the media questioning a politiciano you have finally go the the interview stage and they tell you its next Monday at 4:00 pm. And you are excited as anything, probably throwing your fists  in the air, jumping up and down in hysterics! But then it dawns upon you that they are going to ask you serious questions and probe you to see how good you really are for the job. Remember that probably 5 other people also got the call and are being interviewed too. So you have some competition on your hands!

Next step is to start thinking and mentally preparing yourself for the questions that will come at you. Some may be directly related to your abilities and if you have what it takes. Some though will be indirect. You are there as a participant being interview, not an observer watching on the sidelines. The spotlight is on you! This is a meeting and like most meetings, every participant needs to prepare and especially if they are having a part in contributing to the discussion.

Get ahead of the competition (the other interviewees) by thinking about the kind of questions that would show you have a good understanding and knowledge of the employers’ business operations. Demonstrate that you have done your research and taken an active interest in them. After all, they are doing so for you!

You could say something along these lines (for a business real estate/operations management role:

From having a good look through your company website, I noticed that your management team are planning to acquire a new office block on county street in West Meadows. I am wondering will I be managing this acquisition or has this already been settled now?

This kind of questioning will demonstrate to the employer that you are already thinking about the job and what value you will add. It shows initiative and a desire to succeed. You are taking an interest in something that could affect your role!

So demonstrate and prove that you did your homework by asking specific and interesting questions about the role and the company.

 

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist & Resume Writing Expert.

With over 7 years’ experience in Recruitment, Employment Services and Corporate Training, Matthew has developed a wealth of knowledge and experience in resume writing, interview skills, job searching strategies, selection criteria writing and career planning. 

His approach to resume writing is to actually sell the individual, shine a light on their best qualities and powerfully market them to prospective employers. 

Matthew holds a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development and a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics.

 

Why it’s important to write a ‘thank you letter’ after your interview, by Matthew Coppola


It is very important and can even persuade a potential employer to hire you, by sending a thank you letter or email right after an interview. Most employers appreciate the effort and initiative taken by the interviewees when they follow up right after the interview. If you have an interview soon, my recommendation is to follow up with a brief and straight to the point note emailed to the employer, but do so within 24 hours of the meeting. Your resume got you to the interview. The interview will get you to the short-listing and consideration stage. The thank you letter will help you get you to the job offer stage.

Now just how much percentage increase in chance the follow up letter provides, well that’s debatable. Even a 1% increase is better than nothing!

A brief, concise, ‘no pressure to hire me’ thank you letter demonstrates that you take initiative and are genuinely interested in the employer, the job and your career. Its shows that you saw the interview not just being a numbers game, but a chance to work for a great employer in a job that you want to sink your feet in and stay there!

For help with resume writing, addressing and responding to key selection criteria, cover letter writing and more, please visit www.clientcentric.com.au

 

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist & Resume Writing Expert.

With over 7 years’ experience in Recruitment, Employment Services and Corporate Training, Matthew has developed a wealth of knowledge and experience in resume writing, interview skills, job searching strategies, selection criteria writing and career planning. 

His approach to resume writing is to actually sell the individual, shine a light on their best qualities and powerfully market them to prospective employers. 

Matthew holds a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development and a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics.

 

Why should you research the employer before being interviewed?


Matthew Coppola is an Australian Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist and Resume Writing Expert. If you are interested in having him as a speaker or utilising any of his services, please contact him by clicking here.

Going for an interview is like going out on a date with someone.  Now both are similar for many reasons, but generally speaking, if you went out on a date with someone and it wasn’t a blind date, you would be more prepared and confident if you knew a bit about the person with whom you were about have dinner or a drink with.

That kind of research might entail conversations with friends among other things. What if your friends told you that she was no good, she would hurt you and she is untrustworthy. And this is from multiple sources including  Facebook page where you see her photos and posts with are in line with the reputation your friends gave her.

Armed with this information and research, how do you now feel about this date? Well not only would you be uncertain about her but you would be more prepared with what kind of questions you want to ask her and you would not let her pretty looks cloud any of your judgement! So research is key to being prepared and confident!

Same with having an interview with an employer.

It’s always best to find out everything you can about the companies you want to work for including: their product lines, competitors, prices, growth prospects, organisational structure, employment policies, key staff and overseas trends and developments which may affect local operations.

You can find this information in places like:

  • annual reports;
  • customer newsletters;
  • trade magazines;
  • product brochures and catalogues;
  • sales representatives.

The best way to approach this is speaking in person to someone who works there or knows someone who does. This is where your personal contact list will be important and this can be found through online sources like LinkedIn, a professional networking website where you can connect and message professionals in your industry.

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Author: Matthew Coppola

Matthew Coppola – Employment Advisor

BComm(Econs), GradCert (CE&D)

Matthew Coppola has more than 6 years’ experience in the recruitment, staffing and training industries with a focus on employment services, specifically Job Services Australia and Disability Employment Services.  He has experience in business development, marketing, sales and training.

Common Interview Questions – A Brief Overview


Matthew Coppola is an Australian Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist and Resume Writing Expert. If you are interested in having him as a speaker or utilising any of his services, please contact him by clicking here.

Common Interviewing Questions

1 – Tell me about yourself.
This seems to be an innocent enough question. But be aware that Interviewers often ask this as an invitation for you to share your life story or personal information. Interviewers often want to know personal details like your age and marital status. So this question often elicits background information such as when you graduated high school or college, your marital status, number of children, etc. When you hear the tell-me-about-yourself question, think of how you can answer with details about your prior work experience, abilities and professional accomplishments that will fit this job.

2 – What else should I know about you?
If the “tell-me-about-yourself” question doesn’t prompt you to reveal personal statements, later in the interview (when you have been lulled into complacency), the interviewer often asks this question. Reiterate why you are the best fit for the job. No personal info is required. It’s up to you what private details you reveal.

3 – Why should we hire you?
Talk about a job where you used skills you believe will be necessary in this job. Point out how your skills or experience meet the needs of the organization.

You can say, “Because I am the best candidate for the job,” as long as you add the reasons that make you the best candidate. Be confident and enthusiastic and emphasize several reasons why you should be hired. “I’ve got extensive experience in (whatever) with the specific skills you are looking for. I’m a fast learner who has learned to adapt quickly to change …” Give examples to back up your statements that demonstrate your unique qualifications.

4 – What are your weaknesses?
One/ of the secrets to answering this question is being honest about a weakness, but at the same time, demonstrating how you have turned it into a strength. For example, if you had a problem organizing your work in the past, demonstrate the steps you took to more effectively keep yourself on track. This will show that you have the ability to recognize aspects of yourself that need improvement, and the initiative to improve.

Do not say, “I don’t have any weaknesses,” or “I am a bit of a perfectionist.” Those answers will turn off interviewers. They know the first is probably untrue and the second is impossible. Being a little bit of a perfectionist is like being a little bit of a liar. Better to use a weakness that is really something you are trying to learn like a foreign language or a new software program. Make sure that any weakness you talk about is not a key element of the position.

5 – What is your greatest strength?
This is your opportunity to highlight your best skills. Focus on your top three or four. Examples would be: “my leadership skills, problem-solving ability, team-building skills, interpersonal skills, ability to work under pressure, professional expertise, ability to resolve conflict” and so on. Be prepared to offer examples for each skill you mention.

9 – Where do you see yourself five years from now?
If you say, “In your job,” you have shot yourself in the foot. Interviewers ask this question because they want to hire people who are focused on specific professional goals. Vague works best. “In five years I expect to have more responsibility and new, exciting challenges.”

Do not indicate that you hope to start your own business, change careers, or go back to school. Such responses indicate a lack of long-term interest in the organization. Keep in mind that throughout the interview, the interviewer is trying to discover if you are a good fit and can make a positive contribution in the job.

10 – Why do you want to work here?
“Because you have a job,” won’t win any points for you. Instead, use this question to talk about what you know about the company, and how your background and experience relate to issues they may have. This shows the interviewer that you have done your homework and at the same time, gives you another opportunity to show how your qualifications and experience match the job. “What I can bring to this job is six years experience and knowledge of the industry, plus my ability to build and sustain patient relationships …”

11 – Why did you leave your last job?
If you lost your last job because of downsizing, restructuring, the company closing, etc., say: “I didn’t leave my last job. My job left me.”

If you left on your own accord, do not say anything negative about your former company, boss, or co-workers. You might say: “There were many aspects of my job that were rewarding but I believe this new position will give me the opportunity to contribute even more.”

12 – What did you dislike most about your last job?
If you loved your last job, say: “What I dislike most is that it ended.” If you didn’t love your last job, do not say anything negative. Instead, use a variation of the statement: “There were many aspects of my job that were rewarding.”

13 – What is a weakness you still have?
A negative question again. Repeat a “weakness” you may have used earlier that indicates how you are working to learn something new.

18 – What salary are you looking for?
Negotiating salary can be a minefield if you aren’t prepared. This strategy is an excerpt: “Do not disclose your salary history or the salary you are seeking. Instead, ask: ‘What is the range for this position?’ You focus continuously on asking for the range, not the salary. When you disclose, you lose the power of negotiation.”

Behavioral Interviewing Questions

Behavioral interviewing focuses on the candidate’s actions and behaviors and therefore minimizes the personal impressions that can affect hiring choices. This style of interviewing is based on the premise that the best, most effective way to predict your future behavior is to determine your past behavior.

These questions ask about what you have done in previous jobs, not what you would do. You will know it is a behavioral question when the past tense is used. “What did you do … Tell me about how you handled … Describe a time when …”

19 – Describe a problem situation and how you solved it.
If you had responsibility in your previous jobs, you can describe a work situation where you were responsible for turning it around. If you do not have professional experience, describe something like prioritizing your schedule and making to-do lists to give you enough time to study. Regardless of the issue involved, you demonstrate that you can think critically and develop a solution.

20 – Describe how you handled a stressful situation in the past.
Give an example of how you used your problem-solving or decision-making skills to reduce stress. An example might be that you learned the value of a time-out for both yourself and your staff. Or if it’s true, how you actually seem to work better under pressure and deadlines.

21 – Tell me what has been your greatest work-related accomplishment?
Choose an example that was important to you and also helped your company. Give specific details about what you did, how you did it, and what the results were. Talk about an accomplishment that relates to the position you are seeking. Interviewers like to hear about accomplishments that reduced expenses, raised revenue, solved problems or enhanced a company’s reputation.

22 – How did you keep current and informed about your job/industry?
The interviewer is concerned that once you get the job will you continue to learn and grow? You could say, “I stay on top of what is happening in my industry by reading newspapers, magazines and journals. I am a member of several professional organizations and continually network with colleagues at the meetings. Whenever possible I take classes and attend seminars that offer new information or technology.”

What to do if you don’t hear back from an employer after the interview.


Matthew Coppola is an Australian Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist and Resume Writing Expert. If you are interested in having him as a speaker or utilising any of his services, please contact him by clicking here.

Time and time again I have clients agitated because they haven’t heard back from the employer after their an interview. They want to know what they outcome was, especially a couple days after the interview having still not heard back from anyone. Going through their mind are questions about how they went during the interview, what they said, what they didn’t say and what the employer thinks of them. It can even discourage the most qualified and experienced job seekers from applying for more jobs. But the question, remains, what should you do if you don’t hear back from an employer after the interview?

Without me making life easy for you and giving you the answer, I want you to put yourself in the employer’s shoes. Now you have just interviewed 15 people over the last two weeks. There have been some that you like, others that you really liked, some that you wont hire at all and 5 people that you cannot just make your mind up on because they all possess different skills and abilities that you want but you have have the capacity and funds to hire one person out of those 5. So there faces the dilemma of almost every employer. And the fact that there are less open vacancies and more jobseekers applying for the one job, means that the employer has a harder time choosing a suitable candidate but also has the power to be choosy in this decision. They can pick the best out of all 5 and do not need to settle for anything less. Now you cannot change or influence their decision post interview stage a part from sending a thank you email straight after your interview which may give you a 1-5% boost in your probability of being chosen for the job. So you just leave it. After you send the thank you email, move on and assume that you didn’t get the job just so you keep sane and can start applying for more jobs. That would be my best recommendation if you do not hear back. I also recommend not calling or emailing them again following up. Trust me, if you got the job they will call you back. I promise you!!

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Author: Matthew Coppola,  Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specializing in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

When should you bring up salary expectation?



I get asked this question a lot by my clients. When should I talk salary expectation? During the interview? Before or after? It’s like as if in our mind we think that if we start talking money, then it’s going to turn off the employer and we wont get the job. Well I have some good news! that is not true at all!

Employers first of all are not turned off by discussion of salary expectation once rapport has been built and they are aware of your strengths, weaknesses and at least it is nearing the end of the interview when you bring it up. If for example, the employer called you, said he/she received your resume and would like you to come in for an interview, and then you start saying how much money you expect to be paid, well that will certainly turn off the employer, for they haven’t even met you and do not want to commit to any salary negotiation until they have met you.

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Author: Matthew Coppola,  Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.