Is It Okay To Send A Follow Up Email After A Job Interview?


You just had a job interview with an employer and you’re feeling quite confident. Or maybe you’re freaking out, carefully considering whether or not you performed well and what you could have said differently.

Frustrated You Didn’t Hear From Back From an Employer? You’re Not Alone.

It’s a waiting game. You need to let the interview process proceed and finish. Once they have interviewed all shortlisted candidates (and let’s face it, who knows how many people they actually interviewed) then they will discuss and make a decision about who gets the job.

The problem with the whole job interview process is that you never really get to know what the employer is going to ask you and what they’re specifically looking for.

How long can it take to secure an interview?

But you may be wondering whether or not it’s okay to send a follow up email to the interviewer thanking them for their time.

Well, for many, there are mixed views on this.

I think it’s okay, but only if your email is super short and straight to the point.

Something like this:

Hi, Just a quick note to say thank you for the opportunity to be interviewed by you. Whatever the outcome may be, I look forward to hearing from you. Thanks.

So something short and sweet. No pressure whatsoever on the employer to make a decision sooner or in any way influence their decision-making. At the end of the day, you want the employer to hire you because they want you not because they felt compelled or pressured.

I believe it’s a good idea to send a follow-up email because it shows that you’re keen and enthusiastic about the job. A genuine, heart-felt show of interest can go a long way to making a difference. And of all the candidates that they may have hired, if there is any slight confusion as to hiring you over someone else, a simple email might just be the trick to push you over the edge to a yes to hiring you.

The best thing anyone can do is work on their interviewing technique. Learn about the art of the interview by receiving one-on-one interview coaching with an experienced coach will guide you and provide you with feedback. Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions offer this service and they do a great job at it.

Responding to the interview question: “What do you look for in a job?” By Matthew Coppola


What do you look for in a job?

Asking this question provides the interviewer with insight and understanding of what it is that you are after in a job and what is going to motivate you to stay and put forth your best effort.

By finding out what you look for in a job, the interviewer can then compare that with what they have on offer and to see if it matches up with what you want.

My suggestion is to be genuine and sincere about what you are looking for in a job. You can the finish up your answer by mentioning about how you feel that the job you are being interviewed for will meet your expectations and requirements in a position.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

Responding to the interview question: “How well do you handle stress?” By Matthew Coppola


How well do you handle stress?

Stress in the workplace is unavoidable.

By definition, it’s that emotional strain and pressure that comes with demanding circumstances. We may feel pressured at times, but being stressed at work is the next level, and it’s not nice to go through.

The interviewer is just trying to ascertain what your coping mechanisms are when it comes to stress at work and how well you handle it. The employer may know that the job at times is very stressful, and so they want to make sure that you have coping mechanisms in place to get through stressful periods at work.

My suggestion is first to start talking about stress in the workplace, how it is unavoidable, why stress can occur in the workplace, why it’s not good to let stress get the better of us and what our resolve should be.

Now this introductory comment doesn’t need to be long-winded and extensive. Keep it brief and to the point.

After you have made your introductory comment, then talk about the techniques and strategies that you implement to cope with and manage stress as best you can.

But my biggest suggestion is not to come across that you are immune to stress. Sure, some of us cope better than others. But the person interviewing you may feel that stress is tough to manage, and in asking you the question, they may, subconsciously, appreciate the way you deal with stress and something they can think about.

And also too, if you come across that stress is non-existent to you, they may not believe you, even if there is some degree of truth to that.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “What is your best accomplishment to date?” By Matthew Coppola


What is your best accomplishment to date?

This is a question asked by an interviewer to find out something in your career thus far that you are most proud of and an achievement that can show the kind of person you are in the workplace.

Indeed, an individual’s achievements say much about who they are. The same goes for helping to determine the right person for the job.

When responding to this question, my suggestion is to either bring up your best accomplishment, providing details of employer/job/role/outcome, or, if you have multiple achievements and you just can’t pick one, choose to either say a couple great achievements or pick the one most relevant to the job you are being interviewed for.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “Why are you leaving your current position?” By Matthew Coppola


Why are you leaving your current position?

There are many reasons why someone would leave their job.

They may have been made redundant, left for personal reasons or lost their job either for performance reasons or did not pass the probation period. Whatever the reason is (There could be so many reasons) this question usually comes up in an interview.

WHY IS THIS QUESTION ASKED

The employer/recruiter wants to know why you left your job because it’s a fair question and they want to be aware of your intentions and reasons for applying.

You may however decide not to tell them the real reason why you left. You may feel that they will think negatively of you or that you may lose the opportunity to secure the job because of your reason/s for leaving.

This is indeed a tricky question.

You may decide to be upfront and honest about your real reasons for leaving.

Or, you could approach the question the following way:

  • Explaining that you left for personal reasons, but then conclude by talking about the positive points of your experience, what you learnt and how you are ready to now take the next step in your career.

By taking this approach, no specific reason is provided but the prospective employer sees that you are positive about it all and just wanting to progress and move forward.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “Why do you want this job?” By Matthew Coppola


Why do you want this job?

Fairly straight forward question, right?

For most people, the real reason why they want the job may not be exactly what they decide is appropriate in the interview to say.

How so?

Some of the real reasons for wanting the job are:

  • Unemployed – need to pay the bills and so having a job is high priority. 
  • More money/higher income and greater job challenges.
  • To be involved and part of the work force.
  • Really need a job to sustain a certain lifestyle.
  • Desire to be industrious, hard working and busy.

I have highlighted the main reasons which I believe are the most common.

But should you prefer to provide another reason other then what I have listed above, you may opt to say the following:

  • Role really interests me and is exactly what I am looking for to make next step in my career.
  • As much as I have thoroughly enjoyed my time in my currently role, I feel now after ____ years, I am ready for a change.
  • Since being made redundant/leaving my last role, I have been actively searching for work. This job is precisely what I am seeking.

Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Dealing with nerves during a job interview, by Matthew Coppola


When conducting interview coaching, I am often asked by individuals about how they can deal with their nerves during a job interview.

They feel that that they get so nervous and flustered, that they forget what to say, have a ‘mental blank’ and end up either saying something brief and short, or talking extensively around the question.
 
Then, they feel what they have said isn’t right and start to question what the prospective employer will think of them besides what is written in the resume.
 
Has this ever happened to you?
 
Indeed, this has certainly happened to me, as you can read here.
 
Below is a list of my suggestions on how you may be able to better cope with those nerves during the interview:
 
  • Have an introduction to your response, finishing it off with a concluding remark.
  • If you have a glass of water in front of you, take regular sips before responding.
  • Slow down your responses – don’t feel you need to rush your answer.
  • Emphasise certain points, stress certain parts of what you are saying, then take a pause – this helps buy you some breathing space and will also encourage them to really meditate and digest on what you are saying and trying to get across.
  • Thoroughly prepare, prepare, prepare for your interview before hand.
  • Get an early nights rest before the day of your interview.
  • Arrive early to the employer’s location and take the time to sit down and relax.
  • Read through the job description before your interview and really think about how your skills and experience match with what they are asking for. By having a good understanding of what they are after, you will hopefully feel more confident in yourself and feel less of a surprise when questions are asked of you.
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If you are interested in receiving interview skills coaching, please do not hesitate to contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be very happy to help.
 

Why we should never worry about candidates vying for the same job, by Matthew Coppola


Many individuals going for a job interview worry about the other candidates who will be interviewed too – thinking about what their competition is. But there is a good reason for not worrying and thinking about the other candidates vying for the same position.

With a small business, studies say to not worry about the competition and what they are doing. Yes, it is essential to be aware of what they do and what they charge, but not to worry about them.

The reason for this is that it distracts the business owner. It may cause discouragement, and instead of the attention going toward continual innovation and business improvement, the focus is going to the competition.

So the same goes for being interviewed. Don’t worry about the other candidates, and instead focus on what you have that makes you a valuable candidate for the role and how you can make a meaningful contribution.

So go into that interview with your head held high, confident that you can do the role and that they will want to hire you.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

How the saying ‘dead-end job’ invokes negativity, and why it shouldn’t, by Matthew Coppola


I am sure for many of my readers, it’s happened to us or someone we know. Why does the saying ‘in a dead-end job’ invoke so much negativity? And, why shouldn’t we see it so negative?

The saying ‘dead-end job’ implies that the job has little prospect of progressing, moving forward and advancing.

It hurts because the person that is said to may not view their job that way. For example, that job pays the bills. Contributes to the overall business’ operation and the person in that job is helping in so many ways to their community, their family and their workplace.

Every job. I mean every single role is essential and necessary. That’s why it’s a job. There is a need for that person to perform that type of work and duties. Without a person in that job, things won’t get done.

Furthermore, every job that we have in our life helps us develop and gain valuable skills, qualities, traits, life-experiences and self-fulfilment about what we have accomplished.

I have fond memories of my time working in various roles in the past, which some may consider ‘dead-end’ jobs.

For example, jobs that I had before and during university taught me much about dealing and conversing with difficult people, perseverance, workload management, organisation, and so forth.

So, I firmly believe that we should never see any genuine and legitimate job as a dead-end because it may only de-motivate and discourage us from really seeing the positive points about what we are learning and developing as individuals in those jobs.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

What if I don’t have any weaknesses when asked at an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any professional working weaknesses that you are aware of that hinder your ability to perform a job to the best you can. Many professionals and tradespersons perform their job very, very well and do not have any areas of concern that they feel they need to address or has been raised to them by a former supervisor or colleague.

So, you may decide to be upfront and honest that to your knowledge, there are no weaknesses that you can think of which need to be dealt with so that you can effectively undertake your duties.

Answering no when asked this question might not be the best approach to take.

Why is that?

I believe this may not be the best approach to take because a prospective employer/the recruiting agent may not entirely view it as truthfulness. But this is only an assumption. It may even impress them. We don’t know.

Another option to take is to think about an area of ‘professional development.’ that you would like to pursue. It might be to learn another language so that you can converse better with customers from other backgrounds, or it might be a challenge that you recently faced (ie. Being confident on the phone) but recently you have worked on this and it no longer presents itself as a ‘weakness’ as such.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

What if I don’t have any questions to ask at the end of an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any questions to ask in an interview. You might be genuinely happy with everything that you have heard during the meeting and felt that there is nothing you want to ask.

But is this always the best approach to take? Think about it from the standpoint of the employer/recruiter.

Do they want you to have questions to ask? Generally speaking, most likely.

Why?

It shows a genuine interest in the position. It can help demonstrate that you are seriously considering the role and that you have paid attention to what has mentioned to you and you have a sound knowledge of the position thus far.

Asking questions such as:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What would you expect the prospective candidate to deliver in this role?
  • Are there any challenges that may be faced in this role?
  • Are there any areas of training/professional development that would make one further excel in this position?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

How long should I wait to send a thank-you email after an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It’s always good to send a brief; follow-up thank you email after a job interview.

You may ask though ‘what am I thanking them for?’

Sending a thank you email that is brief and short is an excellent way to show your appreciation for being invited in for an interview and the fact that they have taken their time to interview you and considered you for the role. It also shows that you are genuinely interested in the position and that if they have any doubts as to your desire to be considered for the role, this will help confirm your keenness for the job.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

What kind of questions may I ask in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


Generally speaking, at the end of most interviews conducted, the prospective employer may ask the candidate if they have any questions before they conclude the interview.

It’s always best to have at least one or two questions to ask the employer. Too many questions can be off-putting, not enough questions or any at all may show disinterest in the role, or it may be perceived by the potential employer that the candidate has not taken much thought about the role.

Good questions to ask include:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What makes a successful person in performing this role?
  • What kind of challenges do you envision in this role?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like training on interview skills techniques and how to best answer typical standard and behavioural type questions?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with interview skills coaching to help with answering interview questions and promoting yourself to the employer. 

They also help with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

Interview skills coaching in London and surrounding suburbs


Highlight your expertise.

Would you like help in responding with more confidence to perplexing interview questions? Do you find it a challenge at times in being able to highlight your strengths to a prospective company and clearly express why you would be a strong candidate for their team? 

An employer can ask you questions on why you are a better candidate in various ways.

It is good to know what the ideal applicant for the position is and clearly comprehend the job and how you are the perfect candidate.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. They also assist with interview skills coaching via online video link in London and surrounding suburbs. For more information, please visit:

https://www.clientcentric.com.au/londoninterviewcoaching

 Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au.

 

 

Importance of displaying positive body language in an interview setting, by Matthew Coppola


Sometimes it doesn’t matter what we say or how we say something. Because if our body language – that is our physical mannerism and stature – does not match up with what we are saying, then the message that we are trying to get across will be skewered and misinterpreted.

In fact, research suggests that our body language accounts for upwards of 90% of our communication and what we are really trying to say.

This really is why it is so important to be aware of our own body language, particularly in an interview setting where the interviewer may be reading into everything we say and do in front of them.

I will address a couple areas where we need to be mindful of our body language in an interview setting:

Face to face sitting in front of an interviewer – This can be very daunting. We might feel as though we are being interrogated and there is a bright light shining in our eyes! Okay, I am exaggerating here. But the fact of the matter is, it’s not easy being in front of another person knowing full well that they are trying to make a decision on whether to hire you or not, and it all rests upon what you say and do.

So try to have an open posture and keep your hands clasped together. Don’t fidget. And if naturally, you are someone that uses your hands when talking, try to keep this minimal and relevant to what you are saying. Try to avoid crossing your arms or resting your hands on your legs like you are ready to finish up with the interview.

Facial expressions – Don’t be afraid to smile or show facial expressions. Obviously, don’t overdo it. But show a nice smile and use your facial expressions intermittingly.

To sit back or not. To lean forward or not. What should I do?? Help! – There is nothing wrong with sitting back or leaning forward. Or doing both intermittingly in the course of the interview. Just avoid slouching and coming across disinterested. If you are trying to make a point or elaborate on something, feel free to lean forward but not too much.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au

They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching-for-melbourne

They also assist former Australian Defence personnel and their partners with their job applications into civilian employment. Further details can be found at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/defencetransition

 

 

 

How to answer the interview question: “Why are you changing jobs?” By Matthew Coppola


This is a common question that employers ask during the interview.

 

The employer doesn’t want someone half-hearted about their decision to change employment.

To be half-hearted means that you are neither here nor there. The main thing is that you come across credible.

When you desire to want to leave your job, there can be many circumstances surrounding your decision. Some of the reasons can be that:

  • You honestly want a job that brings with it new challenges
  • You are searching for better prospects and more opportunities.

But above all, try and avoid saying anything negative about the company or that you had issues and matters unresolved with your superiors or teammates.

Always put other organisations, companies and individuals in a positive light.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with putting your best foot forward to an employer.

 They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching-for-melbourne

Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au.