Why it Matters More than Ever to Stand Out from Other Applicants


You hear it regularly on the news. Job losses in the thousands. People being made redundant from organisations trying to downsize and go leaner to cut costs to better weather a harsh and multifaceted economic climate. Today, the news seems to form a large part of our life, grabbing our attention more than ever it seems.

Going back twenty or thirty years ago, finding work many would say was much more straightforward. Some individuals found that they could rock up to a business, say that they were looking for work, what they could do and their experience, then to be interviewed there on the spot or be offered the job to start right away.

How important is a well written CV in the process of applying for jobs?

Article by Matthew Coppola

It’s incredibly important now more than ever to stand out from other applicants and make an impression simply because of how competitive the jobs market is and just how flooded are positions advertised because of so many candidates vying for the same position.

You can stand out from other applicants by having your resume professionally revamped, cover letter expertly worded and tailored and write accurate responses to key selection criteria. The team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions offer these services to clients all over Australia. And, once you have secured an interview, unfortunately, it’s not as straightforward anymore.

You need to be able to sell your experience and skillset to a prospective employer which you can do so by refining and finessing your interview technique. You can receive interview coaching from Client Centric too.

Is It Okay To Send A Follow Up Email After A Job Interview?

Article by Matthew Coppola

Have you ever looked at a large crowd of people, and for some reason, your attention is drawn to a person in the crowd.

They might be wearing a bright coloured outfit. They stand out. The same is true for job seekers.

While I’m not suggesting that you need a colourful CV with pretty pictures, the content must stand out and not only capture the potential employer’s attention, but hold it too.

When You Don’t Have An Example To Use In Addressing Selection Criteria


You’ve come across a position that you’re quite interested in, and they ask you to address a set of key selection criteria. That’s all good and well. But there’s just one problem. You don’t have enough relevant working examples to demonstrate your competence in meeting some or all of the criteria.

So, faced with this dilemma, what can you do?

My suggestion is to use an imaginative situation, a “what-if” scenario to show what you would do should that situation arise.

Or, you could highlight your skills and knowledge, and instead of using an example, talk about your familiarity with the criterion.

A high level of verbal and written communication skills and interpersonal skills.


This particular selection criterion is asking for you to prove that you can speak and write at a high level and that you can engage well with others at an interpersonal level.

If you would like assistance with addressing this criterion, contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions by clicking here

No matter the role, no matter the industry, they have the expertise to address the selection criteria for you.

Experience liaising with community organisations and other key stakeholders to collaborate on the clients’ needs.


This particular selection criterion is asking about your experience engaging with community organisations, as well as other stakeholders relevant to the community sector and who you collaborated, or worked closely with, on meeting the needs of your clients.

If you would like help with addressing this selection criterion, then contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions by clicking here.

They are specialists in addressing key selection criteria

Dealing with uninformative job descriptions when addressing selection criteria, by Matthew Coppola


Do you need to address a set of key selection criteria for a specific role? Contact the team at Client Centric, the specialists in writing selection criteria.

For many, addressing key selection criteria is already a challenge enough in itself. Writing out lengthy responses to secure an interview and be considered for the role does take time and energy.

Which further makes it difficult when you are dealing with a job description that is not informative, clear or straightforward. So the question you ask then is what I should do with an uninformative job description?

My suggestion is that you first work with what you have. Draw out as much as you can from the job description, however light on information it may be. Secondly, you may choose to contact the person listed in charge of the role and ask them more about what is involved, taking notes in doing so. Thirdly, you may choose to resort to looking at other job descriptions for similar roles.

Whether you’re in Perth, Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide, Hobart, Canberra, Brisbane or the Gold Coast, if you need to apply for a job that asks you to address selection criteria, then contact Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions, the experts in writing selection criteria.

Snapshot about the key selection criteria writing service offered by Client Centric


Keep calm and take the stress out of having to respond to key selection criteria by seeking out assistance from the selection criteria writing experts at Client Centric.

Client Centric can professionally address each of the key selection criteria for a position that you are interested in. They include examples, along with incorporating information from your resume and the job description for excellent, tailored responses.

Please visit the following page for more information:

https://www.clientcentric.com.au/selection-criteria-writing

How many words should my responses be to the key selection criteria? By Matthew Coppola


Article by Matthew Coppola, Client Centric 

Looking for a new job? Wanting to move on to a new role? Client Centric can help by professionally writing for you a new and tailored CV and cover letter designed to help market and promote you to prospective employers. They also provide interview coaching and assist with addressing key selection criteria. Visit their website today: www.clientcentric.com.au

So, as part of your application you need to address a set of key selection criteria. How long should your responses be?

Firstly, my suggestion is to find out if the employer/recruiter has asked for a certain number of words per response or how many pages your application should be. Will help you determine the length and size of your answers.

However, as a rule of thumb, my suggestion is to stay around 300-350 words per criteria. Or best to stay less than half a page long, with multiple paragraphs rather than a couple of long paragraphs that may be a little difficult to read.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in your career to date? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help.

www.clientcentric.com.au

 

How many examples should I include in my selection criteria?


Generally speaking, one to two examples is great to include in a selection criteria response. Two the better, but it’s always best to give at least one example. If you can fit in three examples then great, but it may make the response quite lengthy.

The best thing to do it is to be mindful of the person who may be reading your application.

An example of a typical response to a key selection criterion can be viewed by clicking on the below link: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/selection-criteria-writing

 

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Are you applying for a role which has key selection criteria to be addressed and would like assistance with this?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

How long should a selection criteria response by? By Matthew Coppola


For many, the task of writing out a response to a key selection criterion can be very daunting. Many feel that by writing many words and a lengthy response that they will have a higher chance of being shortlisted for the position.

But is that true? Maybe.

Either way, actually taking the initiative to adequately and fully address each key selection criterion may make an impression upon the employer. Essentially it says to them that you not only want the job, but you know you can perform it and are willing to sacrifice time (without any guarantee of securing an interview or hearing back) to write out an application to them.

Generally speaking, a response to key selection criteria should be maximum half-a-page long. This is being mindful of the reader’s time. And if there are six or more criteria that you have to address, that is a lot of reading on the employers/recruiters part.

An example of a typical response to a key selection criterion can be viewed by clicking on the below link: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/selection-criteria-writing

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Are you applying for a role which has key selection criteria to be addressed and would like assistance with this?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

Need help addressing key selection criteria?


Are you applying for a role and need to address a set of key selection criteria in order to be considered for the position? At Client Centric, they help with writing personalised responses that are unique and concise, straight to the point.

They will incorporate your experience and demonstrate how it relates to the requirements of the role, along with writing an introductory paragraph and including relevant examples.

They use appropriate keywords and concrete answers that accurately respond to the question and help to demonstrate your suitability in performing the role.

For more information on their key selection criteria writing service, please visit their website:

https://www.clientcentric.com.au/selection-criteria-writing

 

The importance of addressing key selection criteria. By Matthew Coppola


More and more jobs these days require a set of key selection criteria to be addressed. From positions in Government to roles in the Health Care sector, the human resources team want to know that you can demonstrate that you have the right level of experience and practical skills that match up with the key selection criteria.

So, is it essential to address the required set of key selection criteria for a job that you want consideration?

It most certainly is!

By not addressing the set of selection criteria may work against your chances of being considered for the position.

Are you applying for a role which has a key selection criteria to address and would like assistance? Are you interested in having your resume professionally revamped and written? 

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

What is one approach that I can take in answering a behavioural based interview question? By Matthew Coppola


Most interviews these days will involve both standard and behavioural type interview questions being asked of the candidate. Standard type questions including that such as ‘Why should we hire you?’ and ‘What makes you the best person for this role?’ and so forth. Behavioural questions, on the other hand, are asked of the candidate to find out the approach that they took in a particular situation to accomplish a task or handle a matter.

Certainly, the example is important and would even be great if it was relevant to the role being interviewed for, but on many occasions, candidates simply cannot think of any relevant examples which makes it so important to both prepare for an interview and think about how your experience relates to each of the job duties and/or the key selection criteria.

Examples of behavioural questions include:

“Can you recall a time when you had a disagreement with a fellow colleague. What was the disagreement and how did you seek to resolve it?”

One approach to answering this behavioural question is to first start off by talking about the importance of resolving disagreements/conflicts with colleagues and how it can affect the workplace. Then proceed with an example using the STAR format.

S – Situation: What your role/company was and what the issue was.

T – Task: What was needed to be done?

A – Action: What approach did you take?

R – Result: What was the outcome?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

Interview Skills Coaching and Training | Australia Wide

Interview skills assistance in Melbourne, one – one support, interview preparation skills, career advice, career help, graduates, students, professionals.

Other states coaching provided in Sydney, Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra and Hobart.

How long should each key selection criteria response be? By Matthew Coppola


 

Depends.

Generally speaking, it is good for a response to be half-a-page long, although it really depends on the criteria question/statement and what is being asked.

Some employers will stipulate a word limit for each response. This may range anywhere from 300 words to 1000 words, so it makes sense to adjust the length according to the requirements of the employer and what they are asking for.

The general rule of thumb when writing out a response to key criteria is to decide what kind of examples and content will be included in the response and how much needs to be written so that the question/criteria is accurately addressed in the best possible manner.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

https://www.clientcentric.com.au/selection-criteria-writing

Importance of displaying positive body language in an interview setting, by Matthew Coppola


Sometimes it doesn’t matter what we say or how we say something. Because if our body language – that is our physical mannerism and stature – does not match up with what we are saying, then the message that we are trying to get across will be skewered and misinterpreted.

In fact, research suggests that our body language accounts for upwards of 90% of our communication and what we are really trying to say.

This really is why it is so important to be aware of our own body language, particularly in an interview setting where the interviewer may be reading into everything we say and do in front of them.

I will address a couple areas where we need to be mindful of our body language in an interview setting:

Face to face sitting in front of an interviewer – This can be very daunting. We might feel as though we are being interrogated and there is a bright light shining in our eyes! Okay, I am exaggerating here. But the fact of the matter is, it’s not easy being in front of another person knowing full well that they are trying to make a decision on whether to hire you or not, and it all rests upon what you say and do.

So try to have an open posture and keep your hands clasped together. Don’t fidget. And if naturally, you are someone that uses your hands when talking, try to keep this minimal and relevant to what you are saying. Try to avoid crossing your arms or resting your hands on your legs like you are ready to finish up with the interview.

Facial expressions – Don’t be afraid to smile or show facial expressions. Obviously, don’t overdo it. But show a nice smile and use your facial expressions intermittingly.

To sit back or not. To lean forward or not. What should I do?? Help! – There is nothing wrong with sitting back or leaning forward. Or doing both intermittingly in the course of the interview. Just avoid slouching and coming across disinterested. If you are trying to make a point or elaborate on something, feel free to lean forward but not too much.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au

They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching-for-melbourne

They also assist former Australian Defence personnel and their partners with their job applications into civilian employment. Further details can be found at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/defencetransition