How to stay motivated and positive despite set backs in securing work, by Matthew Coppola


It can sure get tough finding a job. We want the right job, but often is the case we settle for anything just to be employed.

I don’t see anything wrong with that. It can certainly look good on a resume as opposed to a lengthy unemployed history, and it also helps to keep us focused until the right job comes along.

We often say to ourselves – ‘stay positive’ or ‘don’t worry, something will come up’ – however the bills that need to be paid are at the back of our mind in how important it is to have a job.

But often is the case when we lose focus on our job search efforts, the result is:

  • Incomplete and inaccurate job applications.
  • Cover letters that are not properly tailored.
  • Messy applications and we rush the job search process.

Loss of focus can have a serious impact on the success of our job search efforts.

One approach that can really help build up an individual’s confidence is by having their resume and cover letter written by the experts at client centric.

They can professionally write for you a new and tailored resume and cover letter that work to sell and market your skills and highlighting, highlighting what you have to offer.

Visit their website today at www.clientcentric.com.au

They service every capital city and regional areas across Australia including Perth, Melbourne, Brisbane, Sydney, Canberra, Gold Coast, Hobart and Adelaide.

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About marketing services offered by Client Centric


Client Centric offer a range of marketing services for companies.

These include:

The range of marketing services offered by Client Centric are aimed about helping businesses of all sizes to present and highlight their services and/or products in an attractive, presentable and engaging format, both in print and digital forms.

Who would benefit from the various marketing services on offer?

Marketing professionals and sales people may benefit from having some great materials and resources that they can use to bring to business meetings with potential or existing clientele. The materials can also be used by management staff when holding conferences.

Do they use templates?

No. Although they have their own style of design, they create every piece of marketing marketing material from the ground up.

How do I make contact with Client Centric?

Visit their website at: www.clientcentric.com.au

One of their friendly team will be happy to attend to your requirements and provide you with an appropriate quote.

 

Responding to the interview question: “What do you look for in a job?” By Matthew Coppola


What do you look for in a job?

Asking this question provides the interviewer with insight and understanding of what it is that you are after in a job and what is going to motivate you to stay and put forth your best effort.

By finding out what you look for in a job, the interviewer can then compare that with what they have on offer and to see if it matches up with what you want.

My suggestion is to be genuine and sincere about what you are looking for in a job. You can the finish up your answer by mentioning about how you feel that the job you are being interviewed for will meet your expectations and requirements in a position.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

Responding to the interview question: “How would your peers describe you?” By Matthew Coppola


How would your peers describe you?

Asking this question to an interviewee provides the employer with an insight from the candidate’s perspective on how their friends and peers see them, providing some kind of indication on what kind of person they are and what they will be like in the workplace.

When trying to find someone for the best fit for the team, asking this question is a good starting point.

My suggestion is to talk about the most positive, up building points that your peers would say about you and then explain why they would say those things.

Just saying that your peers think your the best person to go to when problems arise may not come across genuine, but backing it up with an example or further explanation will help create some kind of verification to what you are saying.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “What is your best accomplishment to date?” By Matthew Coppola


What is your best accomplishment to date?

This is a question asked by an interviewer to find out something in your career thus far that you are most proud of and an achievement that can show the kind of person you are in the workplace.

Indeed, an individual’s achievements say much about who they are. The same goes for helping to determine the right person for the job.

When responding to this question, my suggestion is to either bring up your best accomplishment, providing details of employer/job/role/outcome, or, if you have multiple achievements and you just can’t pick one, choose to either say a couple great achievements or pick the one most relevant to the job you are being interviewed for.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Dealing with nerves during a job interview, by Matthew Coppola


When conducting interview coaching, I am often asked by individuals about how they can deal with their nerves during a job interview.

They feel that that they get so nervous and flustered, that they forget what to say, have a ‘mental blank’ and end up either saying something brief and short, or talking extensively around the question.
 
Then, they feel what they have said isn’t right and start to question what the prospective employer will think of them besides what is written in the resume.
 
Has this ever happened to you?
 
Indeed, this has certainly happened to me, as you can read here.
 
Below is a list of my suggestions on how you may be able to better cope with those nerves during the interview:
 
  • Have an introduction to your response, finishing it off with a concluding remark.
  • If you have a glass of water in front of you, take regular sips before responding.
  • Slow down your responses – don’t feel you need to rush your answer.
  • Emphasise certain points, stress certain parts of what you are saying, then take a pause – this helps buy you some breathing space and will also encourage them to really meditate and digest on what you are saying and trying to get across.
  • Thoroughly prepare, prepare, prepare for your interview before hand.
  • Get an early nights rest before the day of your interview.
  • Arrive early to the employer’s location and take the time to sit down and relax.
  • Read through the job description before your interview and really think about how your skills and experience match with what they are asking for. By having a good understanding of what they are after, you will hopefully feel more confident in yourself and feel less of a surprise when questions are asked of you.
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If you are interested in receiving interview skills coaching, please do not hesitate to contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be very happy to help.
 

How the saying ‘dead-end job’ invokes negativity, and why it shouldn’t, by Matthew Coppola


I am sure for many of my readers, it’s happened to us or someone we know. Why does the saying ‘in a dead-end job’ invoke so much negativity? And, why shouldn’t we see it so negative?

The saying ‘dead-end job’ implies that the job has little prospect of progressing, moving forward and advancing.

It hurts because the person that is said to may not view their job that way. For example, that job pays the bills. Contributes to the overall business’ operation and the person in that job is helping in so many ways to their community, their family and their workplace.

Every job. I mean every single role is essential and necessary. That’s why it’s a job. There is a need for that person to perform that type of work and duties. Without a person in that job, things won’t get done.

Furthermore, every job that we have in our life helps us develop and gain valuable skills, qualities, traits, life-experiences and self-fulfilment about what we have accomplished.

I have fond memories of my time working in various roles in the past, which some may consider ‘dead-end’ jobs.

For example, jobs that I had before and during university taught me much about dealing and conversing with difficult people, perseverance, workload management, organisation, and so forth.

So, I firmly believe that we should never see any genuine and legitimate job as a dead-end because it may only de-motivate and discourage us from really seeing the positive points about what we are learning and developing as individuals in those jobs.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au