Why should you research the employer before being interviewed?


Matthew Coppola is an Australian Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist and Resume Writing Expert. If you are interested in having him as a speaker or utilising any of his services, please contact him by clicking here.

Going for an interview is like going out on a date with someone.  Now both are similar for many reasons, but generally speaking, if you went out on a date with someone and it wasn’t a blind date, you would be more prepared and confident if you knew a bit about the person with whom you were about have dinner or a drink with.

That kind of research might entail conversations with friends among other things. What if your friends told you that she was no good, she would hurt you and she is untrustworthy. And this is from multiple sources including  Facebook page where you see her photos and posts with are in line with the reputation your friends gave her.

Armed with this information and research, how do you now feel about this date? Well not only would you be uncertain about her but you would be more prepared with what kind of questions you want to ask her and you would not let her pretty looks cloud any of your judgement! So research is key to being prepared and confident!

Same with having an interview with an employer.

It’s always best to find out everything you can about the companies you want to work for including: their product lines, competitors, prices, growth prospects, organisational structure, employment policies, key staff and overseas trends and developments which may affect local operations.

You can find this information in places like:

  • annual reports;
  • customer newsletters;
  • trade magazines;
  • product brochures and catalogues;
  • sales representatives.

The best way to approach this is speaking in person to someone who works there or knows someone who does. This is where your personal contact list will be important and this can be found through online sources like LinkedIn, a professional networking website where you can connect and message professionals in your industry.

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Author: Matthew Coppola

Matthew Coppola – Employment Advisor

BComm(Econs), GradCert (CE&D)

Matthew Coppola has more than 6 years’ experience in the recruitment, staffing and training industries with a focus on employment services, specifically Job Services Australia and Disability Employment Services.  He has experience in business development, marketing, sales and training.

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Common Interview Questions – A Brief Overview


Matthew Coppola is an Australian Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist and Resume Writing Expert. If you are interested in having him as a speaker or utilising any of his services, please contact him by clicking here.

Common Interviewing Questions

1 – Tell me about yourself.
This seems to be an innocent enough question. But be aware that Interviewers often ask this as an invitation for you to share your life story or personal information. Interviewers often want to know personal details like your age and marital status. So this question often elicits background information such as when you graduated high school or college, your marital status, number of children, etc. When you hear the tell-me-about-yourself question, think of how you can answer with details about your prior work experience, abilities and professional accomplishments that will fit this job.

2 – What else should I know about you?
If the “tell-me-about-yourself” question doesn’t prompt you to reveal personal statements, later in the interview (when you have been lulled into complacency), the interviewer often asks this question. Reiterate why you are the best fit for the job. No personal info is required. It’s up to you what private details you reveal.

3 – Why should we hire you?
Talk about a job where you used skills you believe will be necessary in this job. Point out how your skills or experience meet the needs of the organization.

You can say, “Because I am the best candidate for the job,” as long as you add the reasons that make you the best candidate. Be confident and enthusiastic and emphasize several reasons why you should be hired. “I’ve got extensive experience in (whatever) with the specific skills you are looking for. I’m a fast learner who has learned to adapt quickly to change …” Give examples to back up your statements that demonstrate your unique qualifications.

4 – What are your weaknesses?
One/ of the secrets to answering this question is being honest about a weakness, but at the same time, demonstrating how you have turned it into a strength. For example, if you had a problem organizing your work in the past, demonstrate the steps you took to more effectively keep yourself on track. This will show that you have the ability to recognize aspects of yourself that need improvement, and the initiative to improve.

Do not say, “I don’t have any weaknesses,” or “I am a bit of a perfectionist.” Those answers will turn off interviewers. They know the first is probably untrue and the second is impossible. Being a little bit of a perfectionist is like being a little bit of a liar. Better to use a weakness that is really something you are trying to learn like a foreign language or a new software program. Make sure that any weakness you talk about is not a key element of the position.

5 – What is your greatest strength?
This is your opportunity to highlight your best skills. Focus on your top three or four. Examples would be: “my leadership skills, problem-solving ability, team-building skills, interpersonal skills, ability to work under pressure, professional expertise, ability to resolve conflict” and so on. Be prepared to offer examples for each skill you mention.

9 – Where do you see yourself five years from now?
If you say, “In your job,” you have shot yourself in the foot. Interviewers ask this question because they want to hire people who are focused on specific professional goals. Vague works best. “In five years I expect to have more responsibility and new, exciting challenges.”

Do not indicate that you hope to start your own business, change careers, or go back to school. Such responses indicate a lack of long-term interest in the organization. Keep in mind that throughout the interview, the interviewer is trying to discover if you are a good fit and can make a positive contribution in the job.

10 – Why do you want to work here?
“Because you have a job,” won’t win any points for you. Instead, use this question to talk about what you know about the company, and how your background and experience relate to issues they may have. This shows the interviewer that you have done your homework and at the same time, gives you another opportunity to show how your qualifications and experience match the job. “What I can bring to this job is six years experience and knowledge of the industry, plus my ability to build and sustain patient relationships …”

11 – Why did you leave your last job?
If you lost your last job because of downsizing, restructuring, the company closing, etc., say: “I didn’t leave my last job. My job left me.”

If you left on your own accord, do not say anything negative about your former company, boss, or co-workers. You might say: “There were many aspects of my job that were rewarding but I believe this new position will give me the opportunity to contribute even more.”

12 – What did you dislike most about your last job?
If you loved your last job, say: “What I dislike most is that it ended.” If you didn’t love your last job, do not say anything negative. Instead, use a variation of the statement: “There were many aspects of my job that were rewarding.”

13 – What is a weakness you still have?
A negative question again. Repeat a “weakness” you may have used earlier that indicates how you are working to learn something new.

18 – What salary are you looking for?
Negotiating salary can be a minefield if you aren’t prepared. This strategy is an excerpt: “Do not disclose your salary history or the salary you are seeking. Instead, ask: ‘What is the range for this position?’ You focus continuously on asking for the range, not the salary. When you disclose, you lose the power of negotiation.”

Behavioral Interviewing Questions

Behavioral interviewing focuses on the candidate’s actions and behaviors and therefore minimizes the personal impressions that can affect hiring choices. This style of interviewing is based on the premise that the best, most effective way to predict your future behavior is to determine your past behavior.

These questions ask about what you have done in previous jobs, not what you would do. You will know it is a behavioral question when the past tense is used. “What did you do … Tell me about how you handled … Describe a time when …”

19 – Describe a problem situation and how you solved it.
If you had responsibility in your previous jobs, you can describe a work situation where you were responsible for turning it around. If you do not have professional experience, describe something like prioritizing your schedule and making to-do lists to give you enough time to study. Regardless of the issue involved, you demonstrate that you can think critically and develop a solution.

20 – Describe how you handled a stressful situation in the past.
Give an example of how you used your problem-solving or decision-making skills to reduce stress. An example might be that you learned the value of a time-out for both yourself and your staff. Or if it’s true, how you actually seem to work better under pressure and deadlines.

21 – Tell me what has been your greatest work-related accomplishment?
Choose an example that was important to you and also helped your company. Give specific details about what you did, how you did it, and what the results were. Talk about an accomplishment that relates to the position you are seeking. Interviewers like to hear about accomplishments that reduced expenses, raised revenue, solved problems or enhanced a company’s reputation.

22 – How did you keep current and informed about your job/industry?
The interviewer is concerned that once you get the job will you continue to learn and grow? You could say, “I stay on top of what is happening in my industry by reading newspapers, magazines and journals. I am a member of several professional organizations and continually network with colleagues at the meetings. Whenever possible I take classes and attend seminars that offer new information or technology.”

Question and Answer on Email Etiquette


Emailing, Email Etiquette1. What is the biggest mistake people make when sending business emails?

The biggest mistake would have to be sending emails with too many subjects.

If you are sending an email, make sure that it is on one subject alone, not many. Because when people receive emails with too many subjects, the email respondents end up forgetting to reply to most of the different matters.

So I suggest when sending emails, make sure they are on one subject, and if you have a number of matters that need dealt with, keep them as separate emails.

2. What is a common mistake people make without realising they are making a mistake?

Bad grammar – forgetting to spell check is a common mistake people make that they don’t realize.

When sending emails throughout the day, we may become busy and so will rush through an email, and sending it without double checking our grammar and punctuation.

Make sure spell check is always turned on. However, spell check misses mistakes like this:

“I this due by Tuesday”

Spell check would say that is correct. When really it isn’t and should be:

“I need this due by Tuesday”

So it is always good to double check our emails before sending.

Ways you can quickly check for typo mistakes:

Read through the email but only concentrate on the words and their structure, not what the email is reading. This way you will be able to find mistakes easier without getting caught up in the email

3. How should an email be properly constructed?

–         Specific subject

Eg.

BAD:  Next Tuesday’s appointment

GOOD: Appointment for Tuesday the 20th of August 2010 with John Smith

–         Introduction

An email should start off with a good introduction which captures your reader’s attention and helps them to follow on through the email:

Eg.

Hello John,

Hope you had a good weekend OR

Thank you for your time today to discuss the matter with you.

–         Body

This is the base of the email.

Key information for the reader is in this part of the email. Whatever you need to ask or say put it in here.

–         Conclusion

Always end an email off in a positive note or to recap your email.

Eg.

Please feel free to contact me if you would like more information

Kind regards,

OR

I look forward to seeing you next week and discussing the proposition with you.

Kind regards,

4. How important is good email etiquette?

Very important.

A good email shows professionalism so sending a well written email will impress your client or customer

5. What are the possible ramifications of bad email etiquette?

–          Perception by the email respondent as unprofessionalism and lack of care in the way your conducting business

–          The email respondent may disregard the email and forget about it

–          The email may be passed on as junk mail if the subject line is too general or small.

–         The use of emoticons and acronyms like BTW (by the way) are way too informal. Not everybody knows what they mean. Readers could even get the wrong impression of your email writing skills.

Controlling yourself from peer pressure by work colleagues – how you can cope!


What is Peer pressure?

Peer pressure is when group of peers start exerting influence to persuade us to change our attitudes, values, or behaviour so that we meet their desired group norms. Unfortunately peer-pressure doesn’t stop at school. It follows us right through to the workplace.

Various instances of peer pressure can occur at work. For example it may be that a co-worker wants you to go out for drinks after work but you don’t really want to, may be continuous junk mails circulating around the office that try and capture your attention or could be from a co-worker asking you to cover their shift for them. These are just a few examples of peer-pressure occurring in the workplace.

Is it natural to feel this way?

It is only natural to want to be popular and accepted by your peers at work. Influence from your peers shouldn’t be viewed as necessarily a problem. Take the illustration of a butcher sharpening a knife. The butcher turns a blunt knife into a sharp knife ready to cut. If your work peers have mature, professional and respectful attitudes in the workplace, they can actually help sharpen your knowledge, skills and abilities in the workplace.

However not all workplaces offer positive and up building influences from work peers. Many of your colleagues in your working life, both blue collar and white collar, will lack in professionalism, honesty and respect. They may have views and opinions that are unreliable and even false. So if you do become under the control of your peers, whether it be to cover someone’s shift or gossip about another co-worker, it may be little more than the blind leading the blind. You would just be as much of a fool as they are.

I am starting to feel upset and negative, what do I do?

Have you started forming a negative attitude toward a co-worker or management? Have you noticed any changes in your attitude, behaviour or actions at work in order to fit in? It is true to say that no one can make you do anything you don’t want to do, just like the saying that you can lead a horse to water but you can’t make it drink. Ultimately it is your decision.

You may think it’s easy to not be intimidated by what your colleagues will think of you, but when you are faced with peer pressure it’s another story. For example, what would you do in the following circumstances?

One of your co-workers asks for your opinion on another co-worker who keeps coming to work half-an-hour late. You know that they are gossiping and don’t know the full story, but they’re waiting to hear what you think.

You receive junk mail circulating around the office that has been forwarded by a colleague. Everybody else is replying to the email, and you feel obligated to make a comment.

They aren’t easy situations to deal with are they? Most of the time, peer pressure won’t be direct from your colleagues, but may actually be indirect like from the last example. You don’t have to reply to the email circulating around the office, but because everybody is doing it, you may feel obligated to do the same. So how can you build up the strength to stand up to peer pressure from your colleagues?

Giving in to peer-pressure at work is the same as allowing others to do the thinking for you. The moment you step back to think about the actions that you’re going to make because of peer influences, is the moment that you will have the courage to stand up to them. Using your own thinking ability and knowledge and not relying on your co-workers foolish reasoning’s is the best way to overcome what it is you are feeling pressured to do.

It doesn’t matter where you work, be it in an office or on the factory floor, you may be disliked or scorned at because you are using your thinking abilities. Remember, you are the one with the greatest strength than your co-workers who give in to their foolish passions. Take for example the co-workers who ridicule management and their decisions. Are they heading into a successful direction in their career? Of course not! Their attitude won’t just stop them from progressing in the business, but every other workplace they work at. So is that where you want your career to end up at? I doubt it.

How do I cope with peer pressure?

Peer pressure will follow you everywhere, regardless of where you work. You can’t avoid this at work because you need to work alongside your colleagues to fulfil your job responsibilities. So what do you do? First thing is you need to keep your cool. If a colleague or supervisor says anything to you that makes you feel pressured or anxious at work, you need to keep your cool and be upfront with them.

We will look at two scenarios – indirect and direct peer pressure. An example of direct pressure would be if you accidentally arrived 10 minutes late to a meeting and a co-worker says to you “just wake up did you?” this then makes you feel under pressure because you arrived late and you’re not meeting your job commitments. You should be upfront with anyone that puts pressure on you at work, but in a mature and responsible manner. In this example, your reply should be “what are you trying to imply bob?” this will put the co-worker on the spot and have to justify why they are putting pressure on you.

Or in our previous example earlier, if a co-worker were to ask you to cover their shift, your first reply should be “No, I am not going to cover your shift” and if they ask you why you won’t, put them on the spot by replying “why should I have to cover your shift, am I not entitled to making my own decisions about what I do and don’t?” this then allows you to be assertive and let the other person know that you make decisions on your own, and not be guided by someone else.

The top 3 ways to find a new job


Finding a new job isn’t easy especially in tough economic times. Generally during quiet times over the economic cycle, there are usually more people looking for work then there are available jobs. For every job advertised there most likely will be over a hundred people applying. Keeping this in mind, when looking for work you want to make sure that you branch out into using different job searching techniques. Sometimes it may just be trial and error to see what works for you.

So here are my top 3 ways to find a new job:

1. Apply online with a tailored cover letter and resume specific to that industry.

2. Cold call employers in your industry seeking work that has not yet been advertised (reverse marketing yourself)

3. Drop by local businesses with your resume and cover letter seeking work that has not yet been advertised (again, reverse marketing yourself face to face)

 

An Experienced Resume Writer You Can Trust!


Recently I was asked by a client for their own peace of mind, about my experience and skills in resume writing and employment services. And rightly so! Before anyone hands over money for a resume writing service or any other service for that matter, they have the right to know who is doing the job for them and how credible they really are. This client prompted me to write an article about myself (vain I know) for everyone to read and acknowledge my ability to write a professional and personalized resume that sells to a prospective employer in whatever industry they may be in. 

At the age of 25, I now have over 6 years’ varied experience in the Employment Services and Training Industry. I have worked for Job Services Australia as a Recruitment Consultant and now Disability Employment Services as a Disability Employment Services Consultant assisting local people with Mental Health disabilities in gaining sustainable and gainful employment and being part of that process right from initial registration through to post placement and on-going support. My background in the training sector has been as a Business Development Manager. Moving into employment services, I combined my marketing and business development experience to be effective in building loyal relationships with employers and other stakeholders critical to the success of my clients.

Over the years I have developed extensive skills and techniques from reading numerous books and trialing different approaches in Resume & Cover Letter Writing, LinkedIn Profile Writing, Addressing Selection Criterias, Applying for Jobs online and Career Coaching. My industry experience is so vast and spread out and includes jobs in Mining, Construction, Administration, Health Care, Manufacturing, Retail, Security Services, CEO and Executive level and so many more industries.

I understand what employers want and how to communicate effectively to them. I know how to properly read a job advertisement and interpret what they really want and then address this in the cover letter. This has proved very successful and my testimonials will prove that. I am aware that applying for work shouldn’t be rushed and that employers can tell if you are just sending out your resume for the sake of it. This applies to all employers and jobs whether they be in Melbourne or Perth or in the Pilbara region of Northern WA.

Writing Selection Criteria’s can also be very difficult for people because it is so time consuming and there may be so much you want to say but if you do go on then it will be far too long and may not be read thoroughly. To key to writing a good and effective Selection Criteria is to keep it to the point and give the employer just enough information that leave’s them wanting to know more.  For each criteria, you should have around 1 to 2 examples maximum proving that you have met the criteria in your past employment. Each criteria should have a paragraph with an introduction, body and conclusion.

My academic is a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics at Curtin University of Western Australia and a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development at RMIT University.

Why every job you apply for should have a personalized cover letter


Every job you apply for whether it be online, in the paper, internally with the company you work for or by networking, needs a personalized cover letter specific to that company and the objectives of the role. Too many times people apply for numerous jobs with the same resume and the same cover letter and they wonder why they are not getting any interviews! And if they are getting interviews, they why are they not getting the job?!

The simple reason is that when a company puts a job advertisement out and has a selection criteria attached to it, they are doing that for a reason. Now the same applies in the western world as it does in Melbourne, Perth or Adelaide – all the employers are the same! They are not doing it because they are a charity, they specifically put a job out because they are willing to invest in someone to perform a specific duty or set of duties and want someone who will meet their expectations and perform. Added to that they also want someone that will fit in with their team culture and has done similar work in the past – again keyword – “experience required”.

Every job you apply for must have a personalised cover letter – personalised in the way that it addresses what they are looking for, in the subject line is the job, has the contact name and company name and is dated accordingly. It shows that you took the time and effort to address what they want and took an interest in them and the job!

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Author: Matthew Coppola

Matthew Coppola – Employment Advisor

BComm(Econs), GradCert (CE&D)

Matthew Coppola has more than 6 years’ experience in the recruitment, staffing and training industries with a focus on employment services, specifically Job Services Australia and Disability Employment Services.  He has experience in business development, marketing, sales and training.

His expertise can be found in the Community Services & Non-Profit and the Education & Training sectors. 

This article can be viewed by clicking here

Disclosing your Disability: Job Applications and Employment


Defining the term “disability”

The term “disability” can be defined as according to the Equality Act 2010 in England as: “a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on your ability to carry out normal day to day activities”. Of course this is a very broad definition and covers a wide rang of conditions or impairments.

Do you need to disclose?

At the end of the day it really is up to you whether or not you want to disclose your disability. Some disabilities are harder then others to disclose. For example, a mental health disability can sometimes be less harder to disclose as opposed to a physical impairment which is more noticeable. The decision to disclose your disability cannot just be made on a logical basis only. It’s also important to think about how you are going to feel when talking about your disability and how it affects you and your colleagues. There are those people who are confident with this and would rather get everything out in the open as soon as possible while others will procrastintate and worry about them being stereotyped and just want to be seen for their achievements and skills and not their disability.

The decision whether to disclose or not shouldn’t be made lightly. To assist you when deciding whether or not to disclose, I would like you to ask yourself the following questions:

  1.  Will my disability affect my ability to do the job without any additional workplace modifications from the company?

If you answered no to this, then there is unlikely that its worth disclosing and going through all this heartache, however if you answered yes then I would recommend disclosing but then you need to pick the right time and place to disclose.

  • Does your resume have gaps in history?

If your resume has gaps in its employment history then it can really worry employers. If you have a lot of gaps in your employment history due to your disability, then it might be a good idea to address those gaps through disclosure. Remember that not all employers are going to be understanding and disability aware. There are still employers out that that have never interviewed anyone with your specific disability so it’s best to not assume that they will know what support/adjustments you need. Employers may also be unaware of financial subsidy schemes to pay for workplace adjustments so find out all you can about schemes such as Job Access or assistance from Disability Employment Service providers. If you think an employer may be concerned about the long term cost of employing you, take the initiative and tell them about this scheme.  Not only will this alleviate their money worries but it will also show you are well-informed, well-prepared and helpful.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specializing in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Should I include a photo of myself in my resume?


I was recently asked by a client if he should include a photo of himself in his resume. Now unless you’re going for a job as a model or entertainer, putting a photo on your resume is very unprofessional and does nothing to support your application for employment! There really is no point in doing it. They will be pre-judging you before they have even met you.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specializing in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

 

What to do if you don’t hear back from an employer after the interview.


Matthew Coppola is an Australian Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist and Resume Writing Expert. If you are interested in having him as a speaker or utilising any of his services, please contact him by clicking here.

Time and time again I have clients agitated because they haven’t heard back from the employer after their an interview. They want to know what they outcome was, especially a couple days after the interview having still not heard back from anyone. Going through their mind are questions about how they went during the interview, what they said, what they didn’t say and what the employer thinks of them. It can even discourage the most qualified and experienced job seekers from applying for more jobs. But the question, remains, what should you do if you don’t hear back from an employer after the interview?

Without me making life easy for you and giving you the answer, I want you to put yourself in the employer’s shoes. Now you have just interviewed 15 people over the last two weeks. There have been some that you like, others that you really liked, some that you wont hire at all and 5 people that you cannot just make your mind up on because they all possess different skills and abilities that you want but you have have the capacity and funds to hire one person out of those 5. So there faces the dilemma of almost every employer. And the fact that there are less open vacancies and more jobseekers applying for the one job, means that the employer has a harder time choosing a suitable candidate but also has the power to be choosy in this decision. They can pick the best out of all 5 and do not need to settle for anything less. Now you cannot change or influence their decision post interview stage a part from sending a thank you email straight after your interview which may give you a 1-5% boost in your probability of being chosen for the job. So you just leave it. After you send the thank you email, move on and assume that you didn’t get the job just so you keep sane and can start applying for more jobs. That would be my best recommendation if you do not hear back. I also recommend not calling or emailing them again following up. Trust me, if you got the job they will call you back. I promise you!!

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Author: Matthew Coppola,  Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specializing in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Perth Resume Writing Service


client-centric-small4 (1)We are a boutique employment services company specializing in executive and managerial level roles in all industries and sectors. Resume & Cover Letter WritingLinkedIn Profile OptimisationAddressing Selection Criteria, Job Application Service and Career Coaching. Industries served include, but not limited to, Government, Hospitality, Mining, Financial Services, Construction and IT.

We have varied packages, ranging from our Ruby package for $220 which includes a personalised resume and cover letter, to our top Gold package for $520 which includes a resume, cover letter, selection criteria, Linked in profile and we apply for 10 positions on your behalf. This has proved very successful, however it really depends on your budget.

When should I recieve it?

For a new resume and cover letter, we usually ask for around a week timeframe which includes us sending it to you for your review to see if you would like any changes or additions made, then make the changes as requested.

How do I pay?

Payment can be made by bank transfer into our business’ bank account at which we will send you a sales reciept for your tax records. Payment must however be made upfront to confirm.

What do I need to send?

We will need a copy of your existing resume along with a couple links to jobs on seek that you wish to apply for so we can tailor your resume and cover letter accordingly.

Contact us by email:

info@clientcentric.com.au

Phone:

0415 559 233

Visit our website at:

www.clientcentric.com.au

Melbourne Resume Writing Services


We are a boutique employment services company specializing in executive and managerial level roles in all industries and sectors. Resume & Cover Letter Writing, LinkedIn Profile Optimisation, Addressing Selection Criteria, Job Application Service and Career Coaching. Industries served include, but not limited to, Government, Hospitality, Mining, Financial Services, Construction and IT.

We have varied packages, ranging from our Ruby package for $220 which includes a personalised resume and cover letter, to our top Gold package for $520 which includes a resume, cover letter, selection criteria, linkedin profile and we apply for 10 positions on your behalf. This has proved very successful, however it really depends on your budget.

When should I recieve it?

For a new resume and cover letter, we usually ask for around a week timeframe which includes us sending it to you for your review to see if you would like any changes or additions made, then make the changes as requested.

How do I pay?

Payment can be made by bank transfer into our business’ bank account at which we will send you a sales reciept for your tax records. Payment must however be made upfront to confirm.

What do I need to send?

We will need a copy of your existing resume along with a couple links to jobs on seek that you wish to apply for so we can tailor your resume and cover letter accordingly.

Contact us by email:

info@clientcentric.com.au

Phone:

0415 559 233

Visit our website at:

www.clientcentric.com.au

When should you bring up salary expectation?



I get asked this question a lot by my clients. When should I talk salary expectation? During the interview? Before or after? It’s like as if in our mind we think that if we start talking money, then it’s going to turn off the employer and we wont get the job. Well I have some good news! that is not true at all!

Employers first of all are not turned off by discussion of salary expectation once rapport has been built and they are aware of your strengths, weaknesses and at least it is nearing the end of the interview when you bring it up. If for example, the employer called you, said he/she received your resume and would like you to come in for an interview, and then you start saying how much money you expect to be paid, well that will certainly turn off the employer, for they haven’t even met you and do not want to commit to any salary negotiation until they have met you.

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Author: Matthew Coppola,  Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Adelaide Resume and Cover Letter Writing Services


With hundreds of resumes to plow through, an employer won’t initially spend more than about 30 seconds looking at each individual resume. The secret of our resume service lies in knowing what to include, what not to include, and what kind of a spin to put on your resume, to ensure your resume will stand out from the crowd – to give you the very best possible chance of getting the job you want. There really is no substitute for taking advantage of in-depth professional experience and expertise.

Don’t risk having your CV thrown into the rubbish bin because it failed to impress. We will write and design you a professionally written resume and cover letter that will make you stand out with an eye-catching design and punchy content!

We will highlight your strengths and weaknesses like no other. The professionally written resume’s and covers letters that we create for our clients will ensure the recruitment consultant and hiring manager will want to continue reading more!
A cover letter is a very important aspect of the job application process and can be the difference between going into the bin and obtaining an interview.
Applying for a job that has key selection criteria? Not a problem. With different ways to respond key selection criteria,’s can be very difficult to do. Not to mention the time it takes to write, edit and format each response. We evaluate each criterion separately and create interview winning responses.

 

Please feel free to visit their website at www.clientcentric.com.au

Or alternatively, email us at info@clientcentric.com.au

Resume and Cover Letter Writing Services Brisbane


With hundreds of resumes to plough through, an employer won’t initially spend more than about 30 seconds looking at each individual resume. The secret of our resume service lies in knowing what to include, what not to include, and what kind of a spin to put on your resume, to ensure your resume will stand out from the crowd – to give you the very best possible chance of getting the job you want. There really is no substitute for taking advantage of in-depth professional experience and expertise.

Don’t risk having your CV thrown into the rubbish bin because it failed to impress. We will write and design you a professionally written resume and cover letter that will make you stand out with an eye catching design and punchy content!

We will highlight your strengths and weaknesses like no other. The professionally written resume’s and covers letters that we create for our clients will ensure the recruitment consultant and hiring manager will want to continue reading more!
A cover letter is a very important aspect of the job application process and can be the difference between going into the bin and obtaining an interview.
Applying for a job that has key selection criteria? Not a problem. With different ways to respond key selection criteria’s can be very difficult to do. Not to mention the time it takes to write, edit and format each response. We evaluate each criterion separately and create interview winning responses.

 

When should i expect to receive it?

You can expect to receive your new resume and cover letter within a week and half. During that period we also send you a draft copy for your review to see if you would like any changes or additions made. Then we will make those changes and send it back to you.

 

 

Please feel free to visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au

Or alternatively, email us at info@clientcentric.com.au

Resume and Cover Letter Writing Services Sydney


With hundreds of resumes to plough through, an employer won’t initially spend more than about 30 seconds looking at each individual resume. The secret of our resume service lies in knowing what to include, what not to include, and what kind of a spin to put on your resume, to ensure your resume will stand out from the crowd – to give you the very best possible chance of getting the job you want. There really is no substitute for taking advantage of in-depth professional experience and expertise.

Don’t risk having your CV thrown into the rubbish bin because it failed to impress. We will write and design you a professionally written resume and cover letter that will make you stand out with an eye catching design and punchy content!

We will highlight your strengths and weaknesses like no other. The professionally written resume’s and covers letters that we create for our clients will ensure the recruitment consultant and hiring manager will want to continue reading more!
A cover letter is a very important aspect of the job application process and can be the difference between going into the bin and obtaining an interview.
Applying for a job that has key selection criteria? Not a problem. With different ways to respond key selection criteria’s can be very difficult to do. Not to mention the time it takes to write, edit and format each response. We evaluate each criterion separately and create interview winning responses.

 

Please feel free to visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au

Or alternatively, email us at info@clientcentric.com.au

Resume and Cover Letter Writing Services Perth


With hundreds of resumes to plough through, an employer won’t initially spend more than about 30 seconds looking at each individual resume. The secret of our resume service lies in knowing what to include, what not to include, and what kind of a spin to put on your resume, to ensure your resume will stand out from the crowd – to give you the very best possible chance of getting the job you want. There really is no substitute for taking advantage of in-depth professional experience and expertise.

Don’t risk having your CV thrown into the rubbish bin because it failed to impress. We will write and design you a professionally written resume and cover letter that will make you stand out with an eye catching design and punchy content!

We will highlight your strengths and weaknesses like no other. The professionally written resume’s and covers letters that we create for our clients will ensure the recruitment consultant and hiring manager will want to continue reading more!
A cover letter is a very important aspect of the job application process and can be the difference between going into the bin and obtaining an interview.
Applying for a job that has key selection criteria? Not a problem. With different ways to respond key selection criteria’s can be very difficult to do. Not to mention the time it takes to write, edit and format each response. We evaluate each criterion separately and create interview winning responses.

 

Please feel free to visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au

Or alternatively, email us at info@clientcentric.com.au

Resume and Cover Letter Writing Service Melbourne


With hundreds of resumes to plough through, an employer won’t initially spend more than about 30 seconds looking at each individual resume. The secret of our resume service lies in knowing what to include, what not to include, and what kind of a spin to put on your resume, to ensure your resume will stand out from the crowd – to give you the very best possible chance of getting the job you want. There really is no substitute for taking advantage of in-depth professional experience and expertise.

Don’t risk having your CV thrown into the rubbish bin because it failed to impress. We will write and design you a professionally written resume and cover letter that will make you stand out with an eye catching design and punchy content!

We will highlight your strengths and weaknesses like no other. The professionally written resume’s and covers letters that we create for our clients will ensure the recruitment consultant and hiring manager will want to continue reading more!
A cover letter is a very important aspect of the job application process and can be the difference between going into the bin and obtaining an interview.
Applying for a job that has key selection criteria? Not a problem. With different ways to respond key selection criteria’s can be very difficult to do. Not to mention the time it takes to write, edit and format each response. We evaluate each criterion separately and create interview winning responses.

 

 

Please feel free to visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au

 

Or alternatively, email us at info@clientcentric.com.au

 

From the classroom to the workplace: Peer Pressure



According to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, ‘peer pressure’ can be defined as the influence that a peer group, observers or an individual exerts that encourages others to change their attitudesvalues, or behaviors to conform the group norms.

A person affected by peer pressure may or may not want to belong to these groups or norms. Generally peer pressure is assumed to be only centrally located in the classroom between minors, but unfortunately this isn’t the case. Workplaces today are becoming more and more team focused and generally an employer will hire staff with similar values and attitudes which thus make up a “corporate culture” and all the employees share in that culture. But when a staff member comes on board and finds it difficult to mellow in to that culture and then starts feeling pressured to do so, for example being invited out for “regular Friday evening drinks” or taking part in lotto syndicates. So peer pressure doesn’t just stop in the classroom, unfortunately it extends into the workplace too.

The sad thing is, employees, may feel that are obligated to perform things out of what they are comfortable doing, and like I said earlier, it may be Friday night drinks or a male/female colleague asking you out on a date. Peer pressure generally occurs when the fine line between ‘professional’ and ‘personal’ become blurred.

The unfortunate thing is that peer pressure at work is hard to identify and there are no laws against ‘workplace cultures and norms” so simply put, if you are having trouble fitting in with your colleagues and are finding yourself succumbing to peer pressure, either speak directly with your manager in a confidential setting, or start looking for another job.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specializing in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Who comes first: the client or their concerned parents?


The reason why I have decided to write on this topic is because as career counsellors and employment consultants, we face the dilemma when working with our younger clients keeping their interests in check and that of their parents who have been given consent to be part of the assessment and job searching process. Being client centred means that the client is the focal point, the person who we are servicing and case managing. Client centred or otherwise known as “person-centred”  is the idea of being client-centred in our approach to assessment.

This comes from the work of Carl Rogers, a very influential person in the psychology field throughout the mid 20th century.  The general approach back then were driven models of psychology and therapy, where the cousellor or therapist would intervene with  theory-laden questions, interpretations, diagnoses and prognoses, which is essentially setting a direction for the client. Carl proposed a client-centred approach, where  a way of working where the counsellor is non-directive, working only with what the client brings to the relationship between counsellor and client. Ultimately it is the client who decides what direction in their career development they wish to take and the counsellor/employment consultant’s role is to facilitate that.

So to answer the question who comes first, the client or their concerned parents? Well ultimately the client comes first but the consultant is only their to facilitate the counselling process and if the client wishes to have their parents input, then really this cannot be avoided as it is in the client’s wishes.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Our Resume and Cover Letter Writing Service – Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions


Don’t risk having your CV thrown into the rubbish bin because it failed to impress. We will write and design you a professionally written resume and cover letter that will make you stand out with an eye catching design and punchy content!

We will highlight your strengths and weaknesses like no other. The professionally written resume’s and covers letters that we create for our clients will ensure the recruitment consultant and hiring manager will want to continue reading more!
A cover letter is a very important aspect of the job application process and can be the difference between going into the bin and obtaining an interview.
Applying for a job that has key selection criteria? Not a problem. With different ways to respond key selection criteria’s can be very difficult to do. Not to mention the time it takes to write, edit and format each response. We evaluate each criterion separately and create interview winning responses.

What is the Pricing & Fee Structure?

Packages:    Ruby – $220     Bronze – $250     Silver – $420     Gold – $550
Resume    YES     YES     YES YES
Cover Letter    YES     YES     YES YES
Selection Criteria    NO     YES     YES YES
LinkedIn Profile    NO     NO     YES YES
10 Job Applications    NO     NO      NO YES

When should i expect to recieve it?

You can expect to recieve your new resume and cover letter within a week and half. During that period we also send you a draft copy for your review to see if you would like any changes or addtions made. Then we will make those changes and send it back to you.

————

Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Hiring People with Aspergers Syndrome – What you need to know.


Asperger’s syndrome is often referred to as higher functioning autism since a person with Asperger’s syndrome shares similar traits to those with autism. They may also have exceptional skill or talent in a specific area. As a result, people with Asperger’s syndrome are often viewed as eccentric or odd, which can have an effect on personal relationships, as well as employment.

Symptoms and characteristics

People with Asperger’s syndrome have difficulties with social skills, transitions or changes and prefer sameness. They often have obsessive routines and may be preoccupied with a particular subject of interest. They may have a great deal of difficulty reading another person’s body language and very often people with Asperger’s syndrome have difficulty determining proper personal space, for example standing too close to someone.

People with Asperger’s typically have intellectual impairments which affect their social, family and work life. They also may have problems with language and be unable to speak or speak unusually.

People with Asperger’s syndrome are often overly sensitive to sounds, tastes, smells and sights. They may prefer soft clothing, certain foods and be bothered by sounds or lights no one else seems to hear or see. Many of the behaviours that seem odd or unusual are due to neurological differences and not the result of intentional rudeness.

Social skill difficulties stem from an inability to read others and may include:

  • One way interaction – sometimes when talking with them you may feel you are having a one sided conversation and its often related to a strong area of interest of Client name’s.
  • Avoiding eye contact – majority of the time they may not maintain eye contact with you.
  • His/her inability to read body language – this is our non-verbal communication (ie. You may be appearing busy by looking away, which will signal to most people you need to get on with work. But they won’t be able to read this so you’ll need to tell him/her straight up.

People with autism tend to require structure and routine in order to learn new skills and to perform well at work.

When overwhelmed or stressed, they may demonstrate repetitive behaviours, for example, become preoccupied with particular narrow subjects, unusual objects or engage in stereotyped or repetitive movements such as hand flapping. This is observed as a means of coping with his/her difficulties.

Remember that people with Aspergers Syndrome tend to exhibit exceptional knowledge or talent in specific areas and is exceptionally well at problem solving and detail oriented work; however they may still remain impaired in all key areas of development including social skill difficulties and the need for sameness and routine.

————

Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

All Jobs Resume Writing Services have changed to Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions


We are proud to announce that All Jobs Resume Writing Services have changed name to Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions and our new website can be found at www.clientcentric.com.au 

We are offering the following services:

Resume, Cover Letter & Selection Criteria Writing

Don’t risk having your CV thrown into the rubbish bin because it failed to impress. We will write and design you a professionally written resume and cover letter that will make you stand out with an eye catching design and punchy content!

We will highlight your strengths and weaknesses like no other. The professionally written resume’s and covers letters that we create for our clients will ensure the recruitment consultant and hiring manager will want to continue reading more!

A cover letter is a very important aspect of the job application process and can be the difference between going into the bin and obtaining an interview.

Applying for a job that has key selection criteria? Not a problem. With different ways to respond key selection criteria’s can be very difficult to do. Not to mention the time it takes to write, edit and format each response. We evaluate each criterion separately and create interview winning responses.

LinkedIn Profiling Service

LinkedIn is a professional networking website where you link with your co-workers past and present, join like-minded industry professionals to converse, share, and learn from industry specialists around the globe.

Recent sources reveal that 95% of the Fortune 500 are using LinkedIn to source talent for their organisations. Having an existence on LinkedIn will mean that career prospects will come looking for you. Make it easy for firms seeking individuals with your skills and talents to contact you and hire you!

We will create a LinkedIn profile that will be written in a way that will be found by the correct individuals. We use a number of approaches to take full advantage of the success of your LinkedIn profile as well as using keywords specific to your industry and career ambitions to make sure you are visible to thrilling new opportunities and have a professional online presence.

Job Application Services

We adopt a proactive approach to helping you get an interview from your new resume and cover letter by actively applying for jobs on your behalf. This then allows you to save time and the financial costs of having to apply for jobs on online via job search websites such as Seek.com.au andCareerone.com.au.

We search for suitable jobs that you have the particular skills and talents they need, find out exactly what the job will entail and tailor your cover letter accordingly and submit your application online.

This can be a standalone service or as a package with your new resume and cover letter.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

What Makes a Good Resume Stand Out?


Time and time again I have clients asking me that they apply for so many jobs but they never hear back from an employer. Some have even applied for jobs to only minutes later receive an email saying that their application has been unsuccessful. They then ask themselves “Did the employer even bother looking at my resume??” The unfortunate explanation is no they did not fully consider your resume because they would have been inundated with hundreds if not thousands of resumes put forward for the job but your resume did not make the cut.

So then what makes a good resume stand out from the rest? Well firstly it needs to captivate the audience. Your name should be large and the focal point at the top of your resume. Then underneath that should be a good summary about you and what you have to offer to an employer. This is the part where you sell yourself. That’s resume, writing a resume and applying for a job is a selling game. You are the product. You also are the salesman.

A good salesman knows his products. He knows the ins and outs. He is prepared for whatever question comes his way and ready for any form of criticism. He believes in product is firm in the belief that his product is one of the best.

So there is your answer. A good resume is one that sells you to the employer. That’s what will make you stand out from the rest because most people simply do not know how to sell themselves and that is where the people who get the jobs succeed in life. They know how to sell themselves.

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Author: Matthew Coppola,  Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Ways to find a job by Cold Canvassing employers



Many job opportunities are never advertised. It’s been estimated that more than half of positions vacant in Australia are filled through an informal network rather than formally advertised. Often called the “hidden job market”, these jobs can only be accessed through networking or cold calling. These techniques are among the most powerful and effective way of finding a job, and planning and practice will increase your confidence.

Once you know what industry or type of job you want to do, thorough research is called for. Make some notes about what you already know about the industry or type of job you would like. A second list might be made up of what you don’t yet know but need to find out. The information you need includes:

  • Where is the industry or job type geographically located? Would you have to relocate to work in this area?
  • Is this industry growing or shrinking? Is this a high-demand occupation or are unemployment rates high?
  • Which companies are the major “players” in the industry?
  • Is there a professional association that represents this industry or this group of workers?
  • Are there related occupations that face skill shortages?
  • Are formal qualifications required to work in this industry or occupation?
  • Where will you find these types of jobs? Only in large corporations, or in small businesses as well?
  • Are these types of vacancies generally filled by recruitment agencies or directly by the companies?

This may seem a daunting list, but reading the employment sections of the major newspapers over a period of weeks can often provide a good feel for this information. Your local library may keep back copies of newspapers. If there’s a professional association for the industry or occupation, call or visit and ask for or buy copies of the trade journal. If you’re at university or high school, make use of your career guidance services. You’re already using the Internet: make full use of its potential for research. It’s worth taking some time to explore different search engines and how to refine your search for information. Yellow Pages directories are a good starting point for identifying names and locations of companies.

Finish this process by compiling a list of the companies you want to work for. It might be the specific department of a single company or your list might include every company in the industry that is located within a 20 km radius of home.

Research the companies

Next, find out everything you can about your target companies: their product lines, competitors, prices, growth prospects, organisational structure, employment policies, key staff and overseas trends and developments which may effect local operations.

You can find this information in places like:

  • annual reports;
  • customer newsletters;
  • trade magazines;
  • product brochures and catalogues;
  • sales representatives.

The best option is speaking in person to someone who works there or knows someone who does. This is where your personal contact list will be vital.

Attend conferences, seminars and trade shows
Trade shows are a showcase for companies in your industry of interest. They’ll give you a good feel for corporate size, culture, reputation and you can have a chat with representatives of each company.

Seminars and conferences provide valuable opportunities for informally meeting people who are already working in the industry. These are most likely in professional occupations and they are often expensive. They are worthwhile as long as you’re willing and able to “work the room.”

The meeting approach

You:  “Hello Fiona. I’m Roger Smart. I was really interested in your presentation this morning. I’m about to graduate from the editing course at X university/I’m looking to move from a career in marketing into the publishing business. I understand that Context Publishing is a big client of yours. I’m really interested in working for Context, and I’d love to know more about them from an insider’s point of view. It might not be the best time now, but is there a chance we could arrange to talk further?”

List personal contacts

Co-workers (past and present), neighbours, previous employers, family members, friends, your professional advisors, lecturers, sporting buddies, suppliers and customers can all be the start of your contacts list. (Some of these relationships may be sensitive, particularly if you are already working and your employer doesn’t know you’re looking for another position.) Get in touch with your contacts and ask if they can help directly or by referring you to someone they know who can.

Use your contacts to explore opportunities and to gather more information. Asking outright for a job can put a contact in an embarrassing position. It’s more appropriate to ask them for their advice: “John, I’m interested in moving into the publishing industry — do you know anyone I should be talking to?”. If John can suggest someone, ask if you can use his name when you introduce yourself. Always remember that your contacts are doing you a favour by introducing you to other people and that your conduct will reflect on them.

Be as specific as you can. For example:

  • “Do you know anyone who works for Optus?”
  • “Do you know anyone who works as a fitter and turner?”
  • “I’m looking for a job in advertising. Do you know anyone who works in that field?”

“I have excellent keyboard skills and I’m familiar with computers. I have three years experience as a receptionist. I want to use these skills in a customer service job. Can you give me any advice, or do you know anyone who might be able to help?”

Ask for the job

Cold calling still means ringing strangers and asking for a job. You’ll be better equipped to do this once you’re armed with a good knowledge of the industry or company.

  • Know the name and title of the person who has the power to hire you.
  • Rehearse your opening line, including demonstrating your knowledge of and specific interest in that company.
  • Mention how you can benefit the company.

Depending on the type of work, your goal in making a call may be to organise a visit or to send your CV, which you then follow up. Your research should have revealed what is the more effective strategy for the industry and job you are chasing.

Keep a record
Keep a record of all the contacts you make. This record could be as elaborate as creating a database or a Word macro on your home computer or laptop or as simple as an exercise book, ruled into columns. How you do it isn’t nearly as important as keeping your records accurate.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, LinkedIn Profiles, Addressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Why Being Attractive Get’s You Further in Your Career



There is no question about it, and statistics will back it up, good looking and handsome people get on better with other people than those not so fortunate in the looks department. The better looking you are, the less harder you have to work to make friends. Let’s face it, guys would you rather take Susan Boyle out on a date or Megan Fox? And girls would you say yes to going out on a date with Johnny Depp or Steve Tyler? I rest my case.

Now attractiveness is very hard to define, and we all have different perceptions as to what we see as attractive. If we ignore the obvious impairments such as big noses and buck teeth, all of which can be corrected with a trip to the dentist or plastic surgeon, is difficult to define. Then there are some people like Julia Roberts and Sean Penn who aren’t exactly classically good looking, but we find them attractive due to their charm, magnetism and charisma. They have presence and personality that grabs your attention.

You too must have these non-physical attributes and qualities that are attractive. Besides they are much easier to obtain then looks anyway. Looks are superficial and most people can see past them. But if they look past your looks and see that your personality isn’t so good looking, it wont work in your favour at all,  no matter how many blessings you’ve been given in the looks department. Dress well, have good grooming, and cultivate a smile. Not much to ask for to give yourself a boost in being attractive to your colleagues and clients. Looks are all in the smile and the eyes.

Do you slouch at work? Look scruffy? If so, you need to change. When walking around the office and to a meeting, stand erect, proud and assured. Give a firm handshake. Show your confident and happy to be wherever you are. Then your colleagues and clients will gain trust and confidence in you. This is what it means to be attractive. Not looking exactly like Brad Pitt or Michael Buble. Just walk and talk like them!

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Why Your Goals Should Be S.M.A.R.T



Establishing clear goals in writing is the responsibility of managers and their superiors, and of managers and their staff. This should occur at least annually, and should be aligned with the company’s corporate mission and strategic plan. The way we word our goals is the biggest factor in helping us achieve them. And some smart person has come up with an acronym to help us remember these characteristics. Goals should be SMART!

S=SPECIFIC
When we make our goals too general we aren’t able to visualize them, and if we can’t see them, we have a hard time devoting our efforts toward reaching them. We are more apt to do a good job of redecorating the bathroom if we have a picture in our mind of how it will look when it’s done.
M=MEASURABLE
If we can’t measure a goal, we have no idea how close we are getting to reaching it, and that can be de-motivating. For example, you have decided you will save some money from every pay check in order to take a vacation this summer. But if you don’t set a specific amount each pay, and you don’t have an amount you want to reach, you are less apt to put the money away.
A=ATTAINABLE/ACHIEVABLE
We sometimes think that we should set high targets or goals for ourselves, in order to grow and stretch. Well, we do want to grow and stretch, but if we set goals that aren’t do-able, we soon get discouraged and we stop trying. The really high achievers in the world know this. They set goals that they know they can reach, and when they get there, they set another goal they know they can reach. They climb the mountain one foot at a time.
R=RELEVANT
Goals have to make sense, and have some importance, or they will soon be discarded. Set goals that make sense to you.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Why we feel nervous on the first day of a new job, by Matthew Coppola



Yesterday I started my first day on the job at a job find company in Victoria. Although it was only an internal transfer for the same position with the same company, I still felt nervous, timid and shy around my new fellow colleagues. I understand now just what its like for my job seekers when they start a new job. The emotions that they would be going through and how hard it can be to get back into the workforce especially if they have been out of work for quite some time. It is a big change and can be a stressful period in ones life.  Similar to the emotions involved in moving houses, changing jobs is just as stressful, if not worse. But why is it that we feel nervous on the first day on the job?

There are number of reasons why we feel nervous on the first day of our new job. Even today I had first hand experience with what it felt like to start working in a new office with new coworkers I have never met before until today. It was extremely nerve racking. I made the biggest mistake in the beginning. I accidentally arrived to work late and so I was stressed in the morning to begin with. I now see why it is extremely important to go visit the new workplace before a job start, say the day before, so then in the morning you wont be stressed and will know exactly how long it will take to get to work and where to park. But thankfully I soon forgot about being late after apologizing and explaining my reason why. I was also nervous because everyone knew eachother and they had built up this team culture and felt so comfortable around eachother. But I realized that they werent going to change to fit in with me. I had to change to fit in with them. I made sure that I introduced myself to everyone in the office and that I joined in with conversation and laughter the team were having. Because I made the effort to be part of their team culture, they made the effort to warmly welcome me.

Then by the end of the day it struck me! I finally realized why we always feel nervous when starting a new job. Its because it means change for us and moving away from what we are familiar with. In Psychology, we learn that the brain loves the familiar. When we move out of our comfort zone it can create a real shock to our brain. For instance, why is it that we always feel comfortable in our own bed then in someone else? And its for that very reason. So to really overcome the tensions and anxieties in starting a new job, we need to make an earnest effort to get to know our fellow colleagues and show interest in the workplace environment and culture.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Why you need to be passionate about your job to succeed, by Matthew Coppola



I have been working for an employment services organisation for over 7 months now, and just recently I was offered an internal transfer to another office within the company over in Melbourne. But to ensure that my transition is as smooth as possible, in the last week working at my previous office in Perth, I had another employee who would be taking over my role to job shadow me. I thought this would be easy and I could teach someone the best of everything I knew, but how wrong was I.

The person job shadowing me had absolutely no interest what so ever in the job and the industry. It wasnt that they told me they werent interested, it was in their body language and the actions they made which made me come to the conclusion they werent interested in the job and hence would’nt perform once in the job.

Ill give you a bit of background about my job. I am an employment consultant for a Job Services Australia organisation. When a job seekers goes on welfare benefits, they are referred to a Job Services Australia organisation. My job is to reverse market job seekers based on their skills and experience, to suitable businesses, so then they can go off Centrelink benefits. Like most jobs, I have Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) to meet. So you need to have self-discipline and personal drive so that you can place as many job seekers into employment and meet your KPI’s.

When I first started in this job, I was really passionate about placing people into employment. I also had the added pressure of meeting my KPI’s but I knew that placements would come after regular and quality reverse marketing. What has driven me to succeed is passion, dedication, self-discipline and just simply enjoying my job. Plus I want my career to stay in recruitment. But when I had this person job shadow me, she displayed none of those traits. Sure, she doesnt necessarily have to enjoy her job, but at least show some interest in the job.

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I am an experienced and qualified Employment Consultant. I provide assistance with tailored professional resumes, customised cover letters, key selection criteria responses and keyword optimised LinkedIn profiles.

All of my work is not only professionally written and edited but also has a unique design,  making sure that your job application will stand out from the rest. I work with clients all across Australia including Perth, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Darwin, Hobart and Adelaide. Having a professionally written resume will ensure your CV stays ahead of the rest. Contact me today to find out how I can help you land your dream job.

Please feel free to email me at info@matthewcoppola.com or call me on 0415 559 233.

What is Change Management? By Matthew Coppola



What is change management and why is it of benefit to your organisation?

Change management is a planned way of aligning people, organisations and processes from their current state to the ideal. Change is inevitable and must occur so organisations do not remain stagnant and continue pursuing the same activities all the time.

Increasing competition, government regulations and growing market forces spur change and the need to address these matters in business change is greater than ever.

Organisations must be capable of effecting change in order to succeed in the future.

What types of developments can be facilitated through change management? 

  • New product development
  • Mergers and acquisitions
  • Management changeover
  • Cost-cutting & Staff reductions
  • Employee resistances to change
  • Deployment of new technologies
  • Changes to business processes

Our skilled change managers will work alongside your management and staff to put into action business changes successfully, so your organisation remains constant and unwavering, ready to tackle the competition in a state of improved efficiency and superior abilities.

Contact us for a free consultation with one of our consultants today.

The following developments can be facilitated by our change management specialists:

  • New product development

Starting a new production line? Changing or removing products from a production line? Our change management specialists can facilitate this activity, ensuring products are adopted into the market smoothly, making certain that your organisation will cope with the change.

  • Mergers and acquisitions

Engaging in a merger with another company or acquiring other businesses? All levels of your company from bottom up, including management, staff and support systems will be affected in some way or another. Our change management specialists will align your staff and processes to meet the changes brought with a merger or acquisition.

  • Management changeover

A changeover of management in your company will likely bring new ideas, values, visions, processes and different ways of doing things. Our change specialists will guide your staff through the change, so they will be perfectly settled in with the new management arrangement.

  • Cost-cutting & Staff reductions

Organisations engaging in cost cutting and staff reductions experience a loss of employee morale and fear of loss of job among staff members, which results in less productive and unhappy workers. We can help by dampening the negative effect of job cutting throughout the whole organisation.

  • Employee resistances to change

Your employees may be happier doing the same things and will therefore resist or ignore any changes in your organisation. Our consultants can assist by facilitating in stages, the adoption of changes throughout all levels of your organisation.

  • Deployment of new technologies

The deployment of new technologies requires training and effective transition among all levels of your organisation. Our change managers are skilled in ensuring a smooth adoption of new technology in your organisation.

  • Changes to business processes

Our change management specialists can guide your staff and management to changes in your organisations business processes.

How to Effectively Change a Client’s Emotion, by Matthew Coppola


Emotion has on a large effect on a person’s behaviour and by learning how to identify the clients feeling will help you provide a suitable solution. By changing the client’s emotion you may be able to help the client see your solution more clearly without the emotion that controls their behaviour.

E- Motion is contributed/created by motion

Several tips to help change or deal with emotion:

  • Change the client’s position- If they are sitting ask them to stand, or if they are standing ask them to take a seat. By changing the client’s body language the emotion will also change.
  • Ask the client several questions to lead them into a positive emotion. For example ‘sir I want to confirm your name is it john?” answer is “yes”. Several questions like this will help the client become more positive.
  • Use your volume to diffuse situations or anger. Slowly lower your voice.
  • Slow down your speech to help clients breathe and panic less.
  • Ask questions to help change what is on the clients mind.

Experience + MEANING= Feeling

Change the meaning of the situation for the client and the feeling they have towards it will change.

You can write an effective resume! By Matthew Coppola


A resume is your opportunity to present all of the facts that show you have the essential skills and experience for the job you wish to apply for. Writing an effective resume takes a while – you need to ensure that you have included all the correct information clearly written and laid out in your resume.

When constructing your CV, Keep in mind that its purpose is to influence a potential employer to contemplate you for the job over someone else. It is a compile of your skills, achievements, history of work and interests.

The difference stuck between obtaining an interview or not can take as little as two minutes. This is the time period is may take for an employer to consider you further as a potential employee or not. Although they may go over your resume twice, it really is that first impression, which comes from your resume.

When constructing your CV it is critical that you remember to make it clear, concise and easy to read quickly.  Your potential boss will only want to read information that is applicable to the position on offer, so think of your resume as a series of facts that are used in making a decision.

Always keep sentences short and list you’re most recent jobs first. Before deciding on the design of your resume, do some investigation and organize the content. Your CV should contain a number of information about yourself:

  • – Work History
  • – Summary about yourself and your career goal
  • – Educational achievements
  • – Career achievements
  • – References (at least 3)
  • – Skills and abilities
  • – Personal information including address & phone number

The arrangement you select for your CV will be reflected by your current personal situation. For example, if you are a recent graduate or about to start your first job, you may not have a job past to include in your CV.  If that is the case, I suggest including any unpaid work, work experience and part time jobs that you have performed over the years for friends and family.

I’m out of a job. What now by Matthew Coppola


Think about the following scenario. You’re sitting in the manager’s office and he tells you he has to let you go, giving you two weeks to find another job. Just like that. How do you think you would feel? For many of us, the possibility of losing our job can seem very disheartening, especially if we have financial commitments. When it does occur, it certainly does hurt and can be a stressful time in anyone’s life. Being out of a job and having to deal with the consequences of being unemployed is hard to manage.

How unemployment affects us

Unfortunately it’s common for some people who are unemployed to resort to stealing, but for those who don’t steal, there are other damaging effects. Majority of the time people will people will feel depressed and lack in confidence and self-esteem. During the Great Depression, almost 25 percent of the American work force was out of work. Being longer term unemployed can turn enthusiastic, successful and optimistic people into being emotionally shattered and feeling as though they are failures.

How you can cope

First thing that you should do if you become unemployed is seek any available financial assistance from your previous employer or Centrelink. Some employers may provide severance pay to employees they let off, but you can’t always guarantee they will. Also make sure that you seek any back pay or entitlements that are yours. The simple truth is that if you don’t seek you won’t find! And finally go to your nearest Centrelink office and report to them your current employment situation and see what benefits are available to you to help you cope financially while you are looking for another job.

Your next step should be to sit down with your family or partner and critically assess your family finances and devise a budget. If you have trouble budgeting, there may be free financial counselling assistance available to you. Speak to your nearest Centrelink office for more information. In the event a financial crisis occurs in the household, budgeting should really be done well before in anticipation. By being prepared, you will be well equipped to handle your finances in the event you do become unemployed.

When budgeting, work out how much you will be receiving from Centrelink benefits or any entitlements from unemployment insurance. Also look at your savings and what you have available. Also are there any assets that you can sell to help you cope? For example, is there a second car that you can sell which you don’t really need?

Next work out all your essential expenses, how much do they come to each week or month? Work out how you can cover monthly expenses by cutting it down and living to the minimum expense. You might actually be surprised how much you can save each week by removing any unnecessary expenses!

Lastly don’t feel bad if you need to seek further assistance from family and close friends. If you keep your family in loop with your situation, they should be more than willing to help you out given that your relationship is sound with them. Sometimes it’s best to not have the attitude that you don’t need help or would come across as weak or a failure if you sought help from your family and friends.

Don’t lose sight of the dangers of unemployment

When the effects of unemployment hit the household, the results can be devastating. Financial problems can rip apart families and turn a once happy family life into one which has family members who are irritable and bitter. Tensions can start to grow in the household, and if you are married, can even cause marital problems.

Over the past years, households which have coped the best in a time of crisis with a member being unemployed are the ones who stick together with every member of the family supporting one another and each family member showing deep love towards the unemployed member. By supporting an unemployed member of your household or seeking support from other family members if you become unemployed, will give you the strength and confidence to find another job immediately.

How do I keep a job by Matthew Coppola


Tough economic times and volatility in the jobs market over the years has prompted many to feel insecure about their job and keeping it. Added to that, it is even more difficult for youths and lower skilled individuals to get and keep a job they are happy with. There is a saying that goes”there is a job for everyone” but not necessarily the right job.

Toughening economic times mean higher unemployment, which inevitably affects everybody, from low skilled workers to high payed executives. This is economics at play and is out of your control. But job loss can be attributed to reasons other than declining economic activity which are in your control. They are firstly a bad attitude towards work and secondly less value to the employer. But these can be changed which is what we will look at now.

Have an enthusiastic attitude

Always remember that your employer during tough business times is going to keep the employees who are continually willing to work, show an enthusiastic attitude and attend to their employer’s reasonable requests and expectations. That is, the workers who are hard working and obedient to the employer will keep their job in the event that staff reduction is required.

If you also want to promote yourself as a hard worker, not only should you follow their instructions and requirements, but also try your hardest to do more than what you have been asked to do without having to be asked. For instance it would be wise for you to go into work half an hour early and leave half an hour late. Doing more than what is required of you at work shows enthusiasm and a willingness to do better, even if you’re not the smartest or fastest worker on site.

Take a moment now to reflect on your attitude at work. Your attitude is how you feel about your work, your boss and your colleagues. Your attitude is reflected by your actions and comments that you make at work. Having an attitude that reflects a positive and co-operative state of mind will boost your chances of keeping your job. But having a negative attitude will do the opposite. It will continually rot away your chances of keeping your job in the long run.

If you feel that your attitude towards work is negative, I would suggest you readjust your thinking or start looking for another job. If you find yourself going to work tired, try getting an early night’s rest or having a fresh breakfast that is healthy, like fruit and muesli.

“Attitudes are contagious” goes the saying, so remember people will imitate your behaviour upon first seeing you. So if you were to go into work with a sour attitude, your co-workers will imitate your behaviour and will likely respond back in that manner to you. But the same also goes when you first see a colleague at the start of work who has come to work with a miserable attitude. You’re likely to be influenced by their behaviour and even imitate them subconsciously. So you would do well to try and control your state of mind and associate more with your colleagues who have a positive and uplifting state of mind. This is especially true to new employees starting out. They can easily learn the bad habits of the other employees.

Be personable and approachable

Starting a new job is daunting for anybody. The first day on the job can be the biggest hurdle to overcome. Everybody knows each other and they discuss things that you have absolutely no idea what they are talking about. You may even start to ask yourself: ‘Will they get along with me? Am I capable of doing the job?’ These are examples of negative thinking and can almost become self-fulfilling. If you start feeling that way, quickly adjust your attitude and ponder over positive things, like the fact that you are capable of doing the job because you have the skills they need, and that they will like you because your friendly and approachable.

When you are being taught a computer program they use or you are job shadowing a colleague, avoid trying to make out that you know what you are learning, even if you do, and just listen. This will show humbleness on your part, and your colleagues and supervisors will even start to like you already. If you do however feel you don’t understand certain requirements of the job or would like to know how you are progressing since starting the job, find a suitable and convenient and approach your supervisor. Don’t be afraid of seeking constructive criticism, it will only help improve your performance at work but also show your employer that you are interested in doing well in your job.

Another good way to show your employer you are approachable is by listening intently to them without interruption and displaying an open body language. This shows that if they ever need to speak to you about an issue or problem with your work performance or anything, they can easily speak to you about it.

I would also recommend telling your employer and colleagues that you are under their wings and welcome any suggestions for improvement. This shows humility on your part and also makes your work colleagues feel less threatened from and more comfortable to work with you.

You can make an impression on your employer!

There are three ways you can make a good impression on your employer. They are by avoiding gossiping, being on time and being honest. We will now look at each.

 

Avoid gossiping

Gossip is private talk amongst co-workers about others in the workplace. What makes “gossip” different from any other discussion is that it usually is founded upon false information and rumours. Usually once people find out what others have been gossiping about them, it usually results in heartache and sadness, especially if the gossiping is cruel.

Gossip is like a grapevine. Rumours start to grow on the grapevine, with the truth being bent and twisted. When somebody hears a rumour, because it is full of so many lies it can be like a sour grape, which is not very pleasant to eat and worth throwing away. So if you find yourself in the middle of hearing rumours about a colleague, be quick to avoid accepting it as truth and throw it away from your mind like that sour grape!

But you might find yourself at work thinking about something which is really bothering you. Instead of televising it to everybody at work, go and talk about it with your senior. But make sure you have reason to complain about something, and that it isn’t your negative attitude that is the problem. But go about talking to your senior in the right manner. For instance, making an appointment when your senior is not busy would be good to do. This way it will be in the privacy of an office and away from other people to hear and have something to gossip about.

 

Be on time

Being late from work and missing too many days from work is the biggest indicator to employers that you are not 100% committed to your job. You may actually be really committed to your job, but if you get to work late too many times, your employer will have a different view.

Be honest

Employers highly value and appreciate honest employees. For example, some employers put more preference on a person who is honest than another person who has more skills in the job. Showing your employer that you are honest is simple. Tell the truth and don’t steal. If you make a mistake, own up to it as quickly as possible and do not hide information from the employer.

So remember, if you have a job, be appreciative. Work solidly to keep it!

Why It Pays To Be Honest In Sales By Matthew Coppola


To many business people, the belief is that honesty pays, but not enough. To survive in the cut throat world of business and sales, many feel that they need to lie or bend the truth to get anywhere in business.But is that the case? Does being deceitful, dishonest and untruthful in sales and business really the answer to gaining success? In this article I am not just referring to small amounts of dishonesty or bending the truth, I am talking about all types and degrees of dishonesty no matter how big or small they are.There is no such thing as a white lie. A lie is a lie.
Any type of dishonesty is created by greed for dishonest gain. Greed leads many business owners and sales people to lie. But you may justify by reasoning that “its business” and “business is business”. Many sales people even put the responsibility back on to the customer, saying that its the customers end decision and “let the buyer beware”.

But, can a theif justify his robbery by saying “let the victims beware”? Of course not! Same with in sales. If a salesperson is dishonest and makes a sale, they are just as bad as that theif. Both the thief and the salesperson have been dishonest.

The theif is dishonest by taking someones possessions without their permission and not telling them. The salesperson is dishonest because they sold the customer a product and not told them the truth about the product. The salesperson sold the product knowing all too well that if the customer knew the truth, they would not have bought the product in the first place.

Yes, honesty in business and sales may require greater time and hard work, but the satisfaction and joy from honesty and truthfullness far outweigh that from dishonesty!

But is this view realistic? Can salespeople who need to meet weekly targets follow it? Well yes they can! To illustrate, lets use an example of an employment placement coach whose job it is to place all types of people into employment, even those who are not the most preferred people to employ.

When you are advocating a candidate for a job, you may find it pays to be honest and upfront with the employer in the beginning. If you hide the negative points about a job seeker and just focus on whats good about them, the employer will be trying to evaluate them and the reasons as to why they are unemployed.

Not only that, but if they actually get the job and their negative side is seen by the employer, it will not only affect the security of their employment but also affect the employers view of you and any other candidate you recommend to the employer in the future.

An Explanation Of Generation Y By Matthew Coppola


OMG. IM ROFLMAO ATM. BTW I G2G but ill BRB.If your not up with the lingo I just said Oh my goodness. Im Rollling over Laughing my ass off. I got to go but ill be right back. Today im going to be talking about the generation that talks like that.Known for their optimistic attitudes, aspirations for higher education, ability to work collaboratively, their open-mindedness, and drive, Generation Y are here. And they are making a statement.They are tech-savvy, travel-mad, self-absorbed, peer-pressured, celebrity-obsessed, Facebook-compulsive, iPod-wearing, brand-conscious 20-somethings who live with their parents and show no loyalty to their employer THEY’RE supposed to be hip, smart-talking, and sometimes seem to suffer from an overdose of self esteem. With a BlackBerry in one hand, half-caf latte in the other and an iPod-plugged earphones surgically attached to ears, they are ambitious, demanding and apparently born to rule. Right now!They are Generation Y and there are more than four and a half million of them in Australia.

You could also call them the internet generation, echo boomers, igeneration, the mypod generation or the millinials. They have become almost a household name!

The exact years are a subject of debate however I can provide some insight into the reason why Generation Y do what they do.

Now if another Generation provided this information it may be how they are viewed from the outside. Today I would like to give you some of the inside scoop for Gen Y.

So what makes them tick? How do we recruit them? More importantly, how do we retain them?

Firstly well look at what factors influence this generation, so we understand where they are coming from.

COMPARING GENERATIONS

Baby Boomers were influenced by the dawn of the TV, Rock and Roll, the Cold War, Vietnam War, the danger of nuclear war. Xers saw the Personal Computer, AIDS, single parent families, the growth in multiculturalism, and the downsizing of companies.

Gen Y have lived through the age of the internet, cable television, globalisation, September 11 and environmentalism

PEER PRESSURE

Unlike previous generations before them, peer pressure has become a major influence on Gen Y.
They wont listen to the media and are less likely to listen to their parents. But they will listen to their friends.

Unlike the pen-pal relationship that teens of the 1970s enjoyed, Gen Y no longer need to wait for letters in transit.

Gen Y are also communicating with one another using different communication mediums than previous generations. Instant messaging technologies and mobile phones have become very popular with Gen Y.

Online communication affords instant gratification for the users involved. Messages appear on the screen mere seconds after they are posted, allowing conversation-style communication between friends.

TECHNOLOGY

Ask any Gen Y What/who has a lot of influence on your thinking and behaviour? and most of them will likely say TV and movies.

Research shows that Aussie teenagers are now spending more time watching TV today then compared to four years ago, up from 2 hours 16 minutes per day to 2 hours and 20 minutes, a growth of 3.6%.

In addition to the growing Internet and video games use, they are now approaching 4 hours screen time per day.

Ease of access to a computer with internet connection and portable devices such as IPhones which can connect to the internet mean that Gen Y spend a great deal of time online and on social networking mediums such as facebook.

SOCIAL, ECONOMIC & POLITICAL CONDITIONS

Gen Y have also experienced different economic, social and political conditions than previous generations. Before the financial crisis occurred, most Aussie gen Ys had no idea what impact a recession has on society.
Which partly explains why most of Gen Y are still living at home.

Although they are the most materially endowed, and entertained generation of teenagers ever, they have been seriously affected by the economic climate.

Economic crises, including the dot-com bubble in 2000, and the United States housing bubble that resulted in the financial crisis have made paying any rent, hard for this generation riddled with high unemployment levels.

Theyve also seen the costs of their parents success in terms of broken marriages, absentee parenting, and an epidemic of stress related illnesses.

Does money make us more happier?


An assumption in Economics is that consumers prefer more, and that one’s utility can be increased through the consumption of more goods and services. In other words, the more money we have as individuals, the more satisfied we are with our life. But does greater income and consumption really translate into greater happiness? Three main research studies are examined, with offer similiar yet different answers.

In one study, an ordinal scale for happiness was derived from answering the question: “taken all together, how would you say things are these days – would you say that you are very happy (score of 3), pretty happy (2), or not too happy (3)?” (Davis, Smith & Marsden, 2001) For 1994-1996, the mean happiness score was 1.92 for those in the lowest 10% of the income distribution, and 2.36 for those in the highest 10% income distribution. This study showed that there is a positive relationship between utility and income.

In the World Values Survey, cross-country comparisons were made to view this relationship on a global scale. In this case, income was measured by each 51 country’s per-capita gross national product (GNP) as measured in US Dollars. The question asked to all respondents: “all things considered, how satisfied are you with your life as a whole these days?” the scale was 1 representing most dissatisfied and 10 most satisfied (ICPSR 2000). Graphical analysis showed that countries with higher GNP per capita on average, experience higher satisfaction. However this satisfaction increases at a lower rate, reflecting diminishing utility as material well being increases (Davis, Smith & Marsden, 2001).

The researchers concluded that there are other factors which affect satisfaction levels, such as health, the political environment, freedom etc. For example individuals with high income levels, but poor health were less happy, then those with better health. Countries with high incomes, yet strict government control had less happier individuals then those countries with less control (People in North Korea can testify to this!) Although researchers still agree that greater happiness results from greater utility, on average that is.

However, Princeton University Researchers have found that the link between income and happiness is “greatly exaggerated and mostly an illusion” (Quinones 2006). Their new fndings build on efforts to develp alternative methods of gauging the well being of individuals and of society, as it became apparent that people surveyed in a new study about their own happiness were overstating the impact of income on their wellbeing.

Although income is a good measure of well being, its role is low and less important then first thought. People with greater incomes do not necessarily spend a greater amount of time doing enjoyable activities (Quinones 2006) In economics it is assumed that the rational consumer will increase their level of consumption for luxury goods and services, due to their higher level of disposable income and will be more satisfied. But in reality, higher income individuals are “barely happier than others in moment-to-moment experience” and tend to be tenser.

New measures adopted are based on individuals ratings of their actual experiences, instead of a judgement of their lives as a whole. The Day Reconstruction Method (DRM) measures peoples quality of daily life. This creates an “enjoyment scale” by requiring people to record the previous days activities and describe their feelings about the experiences. The method has proved effective.

For example, when people were asked to describe their general happines and then asked how many dates they had in the past month, their answers showed little correlation. But when the order of the questions was the opposite for another group, the link between their love lives and general happiness became much greater. This is in line with the finding from the World Values Surveys.

So far three studies have been examined. The first study concluded that there is a positive relationship between income and happiness, the second looked at this relationship on a global scale, still indicating a positive relationship, but discovering the presence of diminishing utility with income, and concludes that there are other factors at play. The last study makes a revision of past research then it conducts its own study. The researchers concluded that this positive relationship has been very much exaggerated and criticize the integrity of past surveys. Whilst they acknowledge that there is a positive relationship, there are still many other factors at play and only to a small extent, is income positively related to happiness, thus agreeing with the other two studies.