Should I include my high-school education in my resume? By Matthew Coppola


Depends really on what stage you are in your career.

If you are starting out in the workforce – straight out of high school, it makes sense to include your high school education and mention the subjects you studies in your senior years.

If you are graduating from university/vocational education, it makes sense to include your certificate/degree/diploma as well as your high school education.

But, when you have many years of experience in a particular role or industry – 7+ years, you may wish to take out your high school education and leave in those qualifications and courses that have contributed to your professional development.

Unless the high school that you went to is known to be highly prestigious, then it may be a good option to leave it in.

Some, however, feel that mentioning their high school education gives away their age – something that they don’t want the prospective employer to initially know – so it is really up to you whether you feel it is necessary to include.

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The 5 signs of a quality build CV, by Matthew Coppola


As it gets harder and harder to secure employment and stand out from other job candidates, it is becoming increasingly important to have a powerful resume that really sells and markets your skills and abilities to prospective employers.

Here are 5 signs of what makes a quality CV:

1. It is specific

Is your resume effectively marketing you toward one particular type of industry or role? Or does your CV have little direction about what career you are heading towards and how you define yourself in your field?

2. It is well written and structured. 

The CV must flow and be readable. Employers have limited time reading your resume so you want to make sure that it has clear headings, bullet points, and is in order from your name to the selling summary then competencies and your education and training and so forth.

3. It expands on your skills and experience and clearly outlines your success. 

Mention some of your notable achievements both at work/school. If you have recently graduated, make sure that the CV reflects the grades you achieved and some successful projects you completed. A brief summary will be sufficient.

For every job role, make a list underneath it of your achievements with that employer/in that position.

4. It is readable.

Does it sound clear to you when your read it aloud? Does it make sense? This is important. You want to impress the person looking at your CV with your exceptional skills in your attention to detail.

5. It is personalised.

Make sure that it is tailored for the positions that you are applying for. Use key words employers in the industry are looking for and make sure that your CV is a good reflection of what is best practice/desirable in the industry.

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Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

For information on professional CV writing services, please visit http://www.clientcentric.com.au/#!resume-writing-services/ck40

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