Is it necessary to bring a folio of certificates to show in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It is up to you if you want to bring a folio of certificates that you have completed over the course of your career.

Generally speaking though, it would be wise to include these certificates in your resume for an employer to refer to, instead than handing them a folio for them to sift through – which most likely will be brief.

One benefit to just listing them down is your CV is that it makes it easier for the interviewer to see all the certificates you have completed in one snapshot – the certificate name, year and issuer.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

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Interview question: How would you deal with the resulting situation? By Matthew Coppola


During the interview, the prospective employer may pose a question about a scenario that may be problematic to see what your response would be to that situation and how you would manage it.

You are put under pressure to think then and there what it is that you would do in such a situation.

Before making a reply, think about exactly what it is that the employer is trying to find out and how that situation relates to the job that you are applying for.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au

They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching-for-melbourne

What makes a true Employment Consultant? By Matthew Coppola


Call it a Job Coach, Employment Advisor, Case Manager or Employment Coach, ultimately the responsibility of such a profession is to work closely with job seekers to find sustainable employment and have the support, guidance and tools needed to prepare for work, apply for work, interview well, commence employment and maintain their job. But more often than not, I see professionals in this line of work too focused on the case management side of things and not focused enough on the actual act of marketing a job seeker to an employer, coaching them to succeed in an interview and be able to deal with workplace politics and issues that arise in the course of employment.

I am a firm believer in the 80/20 rule. 80% of what we do, produces 20% of the results. So by focusing all your skills, knowledge and expertise in doing that 20% really well, you will be sure to succeed and deliver employment services in a quality manner with sustainable, long term outcomes at a high level of performance.

A true Employment Consultant will recognise this and seek to research, learn and study the art of finding a job and progressing further in their chosen field of employment. This is someone who reads books on finding a job, who listens to employers, seeks understand the job seeker and what their valuable skills and experience are and how they can market this to prospective employers. This is someone who takes an active interest in this industry and does not see it as simply a 9-5 job.

These are what I think are the top 10 skills any Employment Consultant needs to be able to succeed:

  • A good understanding and knowledge of how to market a job seeker to an employer and match the job seeker’s skills with what the employer is looking for.
  • Good understanding of the labour market and where the demand is. Where the jobs really are.
  • Superior communication skills and confidence.
  • Strong ability to assert one’s self to others.
  • Strong proficiency in finding jobs and drawing out those jobs from the unadvertised jobs market – cold calling.
  • Someone who can deal with set backs and move forward.
  • Good understanding of compliance and guidelines/service standards.
  • Knowledge of appropriate software
  • Strong interpersonal skills and the ability to build rapport effectively
  • Able to engage with and support job seekers to ensure full engagement.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Holding a graduate degree in Commerce, majoring in Economics at Curtin University, as well as a post graduate certificate in Career Education and Development at RMIT University, Matthew brings with him more than 6 years experience working in the fields of business development, marketing, soft-skills training and employment services industry. He has gained significant exposure in working with employers in sourcing staff as well as assisting jobseekers in promoting and marketing themselves to employers and securing sustainable employment outcomes. He is currently working in Disability Employment Services where he assists clients with mental health disabilities in finding and keeping satisfying and gainful employment and helping them overcome and work around barriers to employment. 

He has helped many job seekers secure employment by training and coaching them in the art of being interviewed and giving the interviewer a positive and lasting impression. He knows how to sell and market a job seeker to an employer and he imparts this knowledge to his clients in helping them sell and market themselves in an interview.

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What Does The “Generation Gap” Mean?



The phrase “generation gap” implies that a great chasm exists between the old and the young, and that it must be immensely difficult to overcome. Kingsley Davis first wrote about it (in a business sense) in 1940. He thought that rapid social change was responsible for this parent-child-youth type of conflict. His initial article spurred a massive amount of research about the generation gap, with a range of results.

There is a perception that one generation is vastly different from the other in terms of values, attitudes, and lifestyle; that cross-generationally, we do not have things in common. When we step back and really examine the situation however, although the conditions do exist, they are actually not that common. What we see are the ways that previous generations have great influence on younger generations despite also having differences, and the ongoing idea that each generation cannot possibly meet the needs of the other.

As a result, we need to view the gap as something that is far shallower and less confrontational than the media or business writers generally portray. In reality, both in the workplace and at home, there is lots of reciprocity between the generations, especially once they come to know and understand one another, even just a little.

The presence of difference comes out of several things that we know for sure. For example, there are currently four, and sometimes even five generations, working in one place. Each generation has specific defining characteristics about how they approach life, not just work.

Here is the breakdown:

Silent Generation (sometimes called Radio Babies), born 1930-1945.
Baby Boomers, born 1946-1964 in the US, to 1966 in Canada, to 1971 in the United Kingdom.
Generation X, born 1965-1976.
Generation Y, born 1977-1985.
Millennials, born 1986 and later.

There was a period in the late 1990s when managers would hire just about anyone with a heartbeat to fill a position. At that time, the United States was short approximately three to four million workers. By 2010, they will be short 10 million workers because the shift of Baby Boomers out of the workforce will continue, and there are far less people coming behind them.

In addition to what is a purely physical numbers game, there are other things to consider. About 80% of people in the workforce don’t want to go to work at the beginning of their workweek, and 97% of them would change occupations if they became financially independent.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

How to Write a Resume Concisely and Clearly


All writing should be clear, concise, and correct. Good writers use plain language to express clear meaning. They write in a simple style that uses every day words. They do not use showy words and ambiguous expressions in an effort to dazzle or confuse readers. They write to express ideas, not to impress others. What do you think this manager meant in the following message?

Personnel assigned vehicular space in the adjacent areas are hereby advised that utilization will be suspended temporarily Friday morning.

You would probably have to read that sentence several times before you understand that you are being advised not to park in the lot next door on Friday morning. Clear messages contain words that are familiar and meaningful to the reader. Whenever possible, use short, common, simple words to say what you mean. This applies not only to resume writing, but also email etiquette and letter writing.

Don’t be redundant.

Have you ever seen a sentence like, “I watched the colorful sun set in the west,” or, “I took off the purple colored shirt”? Now, if the sun were setting in the east, that would be something to comment on, but we all know that the sun sets in the west. Likewise, you can safely assume that your readers know that purple is a color.

Similarly, watch out for words that mean the same in your resume: “We drained and emptied the tank,” could be replaced by, “We emptied the tank.”

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I am an experienced and qualified Employment Consultant. I provide assistance with tailored professional resumes, customised cover letters, key selection criteria responses and keyword optimised LinkedIn profiles.

All of my work is not only professionally written and edited but also has a unique design,  making sure that your job application will stand out from the rest. I work with clients all across Australia including Perth, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Darwin, Hobart and Adelaide. Having a professionally written resume will ensure your CV stays ahead of the rest. Contact me today to find out how I can help you land your dream job.

Please feel free to email me at info@matthewcoppola.com or call me on 0415 559 233.

Why we feel nervous on the first day of a new job, by Matthew Coppola



Yesterday I started my first day on the job at a job find company in Victoria. Although it was only an internal transfer for the same position with the same company, I still felt nervous, timid and shy around my new fellow colleagues. I understand now just what its like for my job seekers when they start a new job. The emotions that they would be going through and how hard it can be to get back into the workforce especially if they have been out of work for quite some time. It is a big change and can be a stressful period in ones life.  Similar to the emotions involved in moving houses, changing jobs is just as stressful, if not worse. But why is it that we feel nervous on the first day on the job?

There are number of reasons why we feel nervous on the first day of our new job. Even today I had first hand experience with what it felt like to start working in a new office with new coworkers I have never met before until today. It was extremely nerve racking. I made the biggest mistake in the beginning. I accidentally arrived to work late and so I was stressed in the morning to begin with. I now see why it is extremely important to go visit the new workplace before a job start, say the day before, so then in the morning you wont be stressed and will know exactly how long it will take to get to work and where to park. But thankfully I soon forgot about being late after apologizing and explaining my reason why. I was also nervous because everyone knew eachother and they had built up this team culture and felt so comfortable around eachother. But I realized that they werent going to change to fit in with me. I had to change to fit in with them. I made sure that I introduced myself to everyone in the office and that I joined in with conversation and laughter the team were having. Because I made the effort to be part of their team culture, they made the effort to warmly welcome me.

Then by the end of the day it struck me! I finally realized why we always feel nervous when starting a new job. Its because it means change for us and moving away from what we are familiar with. In Psychology, we learn that the brain loves the familiar. When we move out of our comfort zone it can create a real shock to our brain. For instance, why is it that we always feel comfortable in our own bed then in someone else? And its for that very reason. So to really overcome the tensions and anxieties in starting a new job, we need to make an earnest effort to get to know our fellow colleagues and show interest in the workplace environment and culture.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Why you need to be passionate about your job to succeed, by Matthew Coppola



I have been working for an employment services organisation for over 7 months now, and just recently I was offered an internal transfer to another office within the company over in Melbourne. But to ensure that my transition is as smooth as possible, in the last week working at my previous office in Perth, I had another employee who would be taking over my role to job shadow me. I thought this would be easy and I could teach someone the best of everything I knew, but how wrong was I.

The person job shadowing me had absolutely no interest what so ever in the job and the industry. It wasnt that they told me they werent interested, it was in their body language and the actions they made which made me come to the conclusion they werent interested in the job and hence would’nt perform once in the job.

Ill give you a bit of background about my job. I am an employment consultant for a Job Services Australia organisation. When a job seekers goes on welfare benefits, they are referred to a Job Services Australia organisation. My job is to reverse market job seekers based on their skills and experience, to suitable businesses, so then they can go off Centrelink benefits. Like most jobs, I have Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) to meet. So you need to have self-discipline and personal drive so that you can place as many job seekers into employment and meet your KPI’s.

When I first started in this job, I was really passionate about placing people into employment. I also had the added pressure of meeting my KPI’s but I knew that placements would come after regular and quality reverse marketing. What has driven me to succeed is passion, dedication, self-discipline and just simply enjoying my job. Plus I want my career to stay in recruitment. But when I had this person job shadow me, she displayed none of those traits. Sure, she doesnt necessarily have to enjoy her job, but at least show some interest in the job.

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I am an experienced and qualified Employment Consultant. I provide assistance with tailored professional resumes, customised cover letters, key selection criteria responses and keyword optimised LinkedIn profiles.

All of my work is not only professionally written and edited but also has a unique design,  making sure that your job application will stand out from the rest. I work with clients all across Australia including Perth, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Darwin, Hobart and Adelaide. Having a professionally written resume will ensure your CV stays ahead of the rest. Contact me today to find out how I can help you land your dream job.

Please feel free to email me at info@matthewcoppola.com or call me on 0415 559 233.