Getting Ready to Return to the Workplace


These past few months have seen many employees set up a home office and work from home. 

Some have found it an absolute luxury to work from home. In contrast, others struggle with the whole concept of being away from their corporate office and have to contend with the proclivities of relaxing, sitting on the couch to watch their favourite show. 

If, however, you will soon be asked to return to the workplace where you can still work safely in an open, office environment, then you may need to start thinking about how you’re going to get ready to return to the workplace. With this in mind, I would like to offer you the following suggestions:

  1. Set your alarm to get up early, as if you need to account for preparation, breakfast and travel time. Do this for a while so that you may be able to get in the right frame of mind.
  2. Try getting dressed in your work clothes and then wearing this all day while you work from home.
  3. Have a short lunch break as if you usually would at work, rather than falling into the trap of an extended lunch break while working from home.

Such suggestions, I hope, will help you to be better prepared to return to the workplace. 

However, you may also feel that now is the time for you to start looking for alternative employment. If that’s the case, may I suggest contacting the team at Client Centric (www.clientcentric.com.au), an Australia-wide, professional employment services firm that writes powerful resumes/CVs, tailored cover letters, responses to selection criteria and provide interview coaching. They aim to help their clients secure work faster.

Tips on finding a new job, by Matthew Coppola


Finding a new job can be a challenging and frustrating experience; however you can make it easier for yourself when you use proactive strategies. The below tips are applicable for all job seekers, both new to the job market and those with many years’ experience.

Here are some of my best tips for finding a new job at any career level.

1. Be clear and know what you want. Reflect on your strengths and weaknesses and the type of work that you enjoy doing. What do you want in a job?

2. Research the organisations that you are targeting. This will help you to get a feel for the organisation’s culture, what you are likely to be paid and if they are the right fit for you.

3. Tailor your resume to each position. By doing this, the recruiter or hr manager will know straight away that you have the skills they are looking for. Remember that your CV is one of the most critical tools for when it comes to job searching.

4. Have an online career profile. By having a career profile like on LinkedIn, you are showcasing your experience, knowledge, and passion online where employers and recruiters search the web for potential employees. Maybe it’s time to get your LinkedIn profile professionally revamped?

5. Be organised. Have a system that works for you, with organising your job searching. Even just a simple spreadsheet to keep track of the positions that you have applied for.

6. Utilise your network of contacts. People you know may want to help you in finding a job or may know that a position is currently available at their workplace and could refer you to their HR manager.

7. Don’t just apply online. Limiting yourself to only online could make the process take longer. Contact companies directly via cold calling or recruiters to let them know you are looking for work, or even leave your resume in their letterbox.

8. Have daily job-related goals to reach. By having a daily goal to achieve, this will help you to stay focused and motivated with finding a job.

9. Prepare for all your job interviews. Develop responses for common interview questions and practice them with a friend or interview coach. The more prepared you are, the more comfortable and confident you will be. Client Centric offer interview skills coaching via face to face or Zoom/Skype.

10. Email thank you messages to all interviewers after the interview. A brief email of thanks highlighting your keen interest and fit with the role and employer is a great way to help make you stand out from the majority.

By Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Why we should never worry about candidates vying for the same job, by Matthew Coppola


Many individuals going for a job interview worry about the other candidates who will be interviewed too – thinking about what their competition is. But there is a good reason for not worrying and thinking about the other candidates vying for the same position.

With a small business, studies say to not worry about the competition and what they are doing. Yes, it is essential to be aware of what they do and what they charge, but not to worry about them.

The reason for this is that it distracts the business owner. It may cause discouragement, and instead of the attention going toward continual innovation and business improvement, the focus is going to the competition.

So the same goes for being interviewed. Don’t worry about the other candidates, and instead focus on what you have that makes you a valuable candidate for the role and how you can make a meaningful contribution.

So go into that interview with your head held high, confident that you can do the role and that they will want to hire you.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

What if I don’t have any questions to ask at the end of an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any questions to ask in an interview. You might be genuinely happy with everything that you have heard during the meeting and felt that there is nothing you want to ask.

But is this always the best approach to take? Think about it from the standpoint of the employer/recruiter.

Do they want you to have questions to ask? Generally speaking, most likely.

Why?

It shows a genuine interest in the position. It can help demonstrate that you are seriously considering the role and that you have paid attention to what has mentioned to you and you have a sound knowledge of the position thus far.

Asking questions such as:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What would you expect the prospective candidate to deliver in this role?
  • Are there any challenges that may be faced in this role?
  • Are there any areas of training/professional development that would make one further excel in this position?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

Is it necessary to bring a folio of certificates to show in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It is up to you if you want to bring a folio of certificates that you have completed over the course of your career.

Generally speaking though, it would be wise to include these certificates in your resume for an employer to refer to, instead than handing them a folio for them to sift through – which most likely will be brief.

One benefit to just listing them down is your CV is that it makes it easier for the interviewer to see all the certificates you have completed in one snapshot – the certificate name, year and issuer.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

Interview question: How would you deal with the resulting situation? By Matthew Coppola


During the interview, the prospective employer may pose a question about a scenario that may be problematic to see what your response would be to that situation and how you would manage it.

You are put under pressure to think then and there what it is that you would do in such a situation.

Before making a reply, think about exactly what it is that the employer is trying to find out and how that situation relates to the job that you are applying for.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au

They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching-for-melbourne

Answering the interview question: What does your job involve currently on a daily basis? By Matthew Coppola


Article by Matthew Coppola, Client Centric 

Looking for a new job? Wanting to move on to a new role? Client Centric can help by professionally writing for you a new and tailored CV and cover letter designed to help market and promote you to prospective employers. They also provide interview coaching and assist with addressing key selection criteria. Visit their website today: www.clientcentric.com.au

adult blur boss business
First impressions count!

The employer has read your resume. They want to hear you talk about your experience. 

Even though the explanation on your resume is descriptive and understandable, when answering this question, you are best to concentrate on what the position your applying for is about and miss all the unnecessary extra information.

It would be unwise to respond by stating everything that is already mentioned on your resume. You want to concentrate mostly on the parts of your current job that relate to the position you are going for.

You don’t want the employer to become uninterested in you.

When talking about your responsibilities and what your job involves, make it interesting and expand on what you do and how the tasks you perform relate to the overall purpose of the position.

Show enthusiasm and interest in what you do. It’s best not to come across uninterested even if you really don’t like what you do for work. Your attitude to work no matter what kind of job it may be, can reflect on you as a person and as a potential employee.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer.

 They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching

 Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

The benefits of utilizing an interview coaching service and what it can mean for you .


For most of us, securing a job is a 3 step process. This includes first applying for the job by submitting your resume and cover letter as well as any other supporting documentation, then being called in for an interview and if successful, accepting or rejecting the offer followed by negotiation. But the most important part really is the step of being interviewed. It can make or break our chances of securing the job no matter how good our application is or our potential as a employee with the company.

Being interviewed and handling the interview well is almost like an art. We need to present well, speak well and get along with the interviewer/s. Most interviews consist of one person or a panel of people, asking a series of question both behavioral, job specific and general in nature. No matter how good someone can be at their job, they may struggle with being interviewed. They may say the wrong thing or the right thing but in the wrong way, speak too short, too long or not show enough understanding or experience. First impressions count in an interview.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions offers interview coaching via Skype, Phone or Face-Face (Perth & Melbourne, Australia only) and the session is designed to provide you with some confidence and understanding of how to respond to a variety of questions that may be asked of you. The benefits to you can be:

  • Improved confidence
  • Better understanding of how to approach certain questions
  • Understanding of how to market one’s strengths
  • How to demonstrate and align experience and value to the role being interviewed for.

Visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au and they would be more than happy to assist you and work out a suitable time and day convenient for you.