What if I don’t have any questions to ask at the end of an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any questions to ask in an interview. You might be genuinely happy with everything that you have heard during the meeting and felt that there is nothing you want to ask.

But is this always the best approach to take? Think about it from the standpoint of the employer/recruiter.

Do they want you to have questions to ask? Generally speaking, most likely.

Why?

It shows a genuine interest in the position. It can help demonstrate that you are seriously considering the role and that you have paid attention to what has mentioned to you and you have a sound knowledge of the position thus far.

Asking questions such as:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What would you expect the prospective candidate to deliver in this role?
  • Are there any challenges that may be faced in this role?
  • Are there any areas of training/professional development that would make one further excel in this position?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

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Should I bring my resume along to an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It is entirely up to you.

You may want to have your resume as a form of reference – something that an interviewer can refer to, or if you are interviewed by a panel of interviewers, something that one individual can look at and read while the other interviewer is asking a question.

Even if they say that they have seen your resume, you can always place this beside you if it is not needed.

Sometimes the interviewer/s may forget certain aspects of your experience. They may have overlooked or not even thought about printing a copy of your resume to refer to during the interview. So bringing one or two copies of your resume may work in your favour.

It can also help as a talking point. But again, it is completely up to you. Some may opt not to. Others may decide to bring a thin folio with the CV/resume inside.

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Would you like to have your resume professionally revamped to help apply for a new job?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

What kind of questions may I ask in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


Generally speaking, at the end of most interviews conducted, the prospective employer may ask the candidate if they have any questions before they conclude the interview.

It’s always best to have at least one or two questions to ask the employer. Too many questions can be off-putting, not enough questions or any at all may show disinterest in the role, or it may be perceived by the potential employer that the candidate has not taken much thought about the role.

Good questions to ask include:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What makes a successful person in performing this role?
  • What kind of challenges do you envision in this role?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like training on interview skills techniques and how to best answer typical standard and behavioural type questions?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with interview skills coaching to help with answering interview questions and promoting yourself to the employer. 

They also help with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

How to prepare questions to ask at your interview, by Matthew Coppola


SBeing asked questions at an interview can be like the media questioning a politiciano you have finally go the the interview stage and they tell you its next Monday at 4:00 pm. And you are excited as anything, probably throwing your fists  in the air, jumping up and down in hysterics! But then it dawns upon you that they are going to ask you serious questions and probe you to see how good you really are for the job. Remember that probably 5 other people also got the call and are being interviewed too. So you have some competition on your hands!

Next step is to start thinking and mentally preparing yourself for the questions that will come at you. Some may be directly related to your abilities and if you have what it takes. Some though will be indirect. You are there as a participant being interview, not an observer watching on the sidelines. The spotlight is on you! This is a meeting and like most meetings, every participant needs to prepare and especially if they are having a part in contributing to the discussion.

Get ahead of the competition (the other interviewees) by thinking about the kind of questions that would show you have a good understanding and knowledge of the employers’ business operations. Demonstrate that you have done your research and taken an active interest in them. After all, they are doing so for you!

You could say something along these lines (for a business real estate/operations management role:

From having a good look through your company website, I noticed that your management team are planning to acquire a new office block on county street in West Meadows. I am wondering will I be managing this acquisition or has this already been settled now?

This kind of questioning will demonstrate to the employer that you are already thinking about the job and what value you will add. It shows initiative and a desire to succeed. You are taking an interest in something that could affect your role!

So demonstrate and prove that you did your homework by asking specific and interesting questions about the role and the company.

 

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist & Resume Writing Expert.

With over 7 years’ experience in Recruitment, Employment Services and Corporate Training, Matthew has developed a wealth of knowledge and experience in resume writing, interview skills, job searching strategies, selection criteria writing and career planning. 

His approach to resume writing is to actually sell the individual, shine a light on their best qualities and powerfully market them to prospective employers. 

Matthew holds a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development and a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics.

 

Why it’s important to write a ‘thank you letter’ after your interview, by Matthew Coppola


It is very important and can even persuade a potential employer to hire you, by sending a thank you letter or email right after an interview. Most employers appreciate the effort and initiative taken by the interviewees when they follow up right after the interview. If you have an interview soon, my recommendation is to follow up with a brief and straight to the point note emailed to the employer, but do so within 24 hours of the meeting. Your resume got you to the interview. The interview will get you to the short-listing and consideration stage. The thank you letter will help you get you to the job offer stage.

Now just how much percentage increase in chance the follow up letter provides, well that’s debatable. Even a 1% increase is better than nothing!

A brief, concise, ‘no pressure to hire me’ thank you letter demonstrates that you take initiative and are genuinely interested in the employer, the job and your career. Its shows that you saw the interview not just being a numbers game, but a chance to work for a great employer in a job that you want to sink your feet in and stay there!

For help with resume writing, addressing and responding to key selection criteria, cover letter writing and more, please visit www.clientcentric.com.au

 

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist & Resume Writing Expert.

With over 7 years’ experience in Recruitment, Employment Services and Corporate Training, Matthew has developed a wealth of knowledge and experience in resume writing, interview skills, job searching strategies, selection criteria writing and career planning. 

His approach to resume writing is to actually sell the individual, shine a light on their best qualities and powerfully market them to prospective employers. 

Matthew holds a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development and a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics.