What if I don’t have any questions to ask at the end of an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any questions to ask in an interview. You might be genuinely happy with everything that you have heard during the meeting and felt that there is nothing you want to ask.

But is this always the best approach to take? Think about it from the standpoint of the employer/recruiter.

Do they want you to have questions to ask? Generally speaking, most likely.

Why?

It shows a genuine interest in the position. It can help demonstrate that you are seriously considering the role and that you have paid attention to what has mentioned to you and you have a sound knowledge of the position thus far.

Asking questions such as:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What would you expect the prospective candidate to deliver in this role?
  • Are there any challenges that may be faced in this role?
  • Are there any areas of training/professional development that would make one further excel in this position?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

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Is it necessary to bring a folio of certificates to show in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It is up to you if you want to bring a folio of certificates that you have completed over the course of your career.

Generally speaking though, it would be wise to include these certificates in your resume for an employer to refer to, instead than handing them a folio for them to sift through – which most likely will be brief.

One benefit to just listing them down is your CV is that it makes it easier for the interviewer to see all the certificates you have completed in one snapshot – the certificate name, year and issuer.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

How long should I wait to send a thank-you email after an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It’s always good to send a brief; follow-up thank you email after a job interview.

You may ask though ‘what am I thanking them for?’

Sending a thank you email that is brief and short is an excellent way to show your appreciation for being invited in for an interview and the fact that they have taken their time to interview you and considered you for the role. It also shows that you are genuinely interested in the position and that if they have any doubts as to your desire to be considered for the role, this will help confirm your keenness for the job.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

What kind of questions may I ask in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


Generally speaking, at the end of most interviews conducted, the prospective employer may ask the candidate if they have any questions before they conclude the interview.

It’s always best to have at least one or two questions to ask the employer. Too many questions can be off-putting, not enough questions or any at all may show disinterest in the role, or it may be perceived by the potential employer that the candidate has not taken much thought about the role.

Good questions to ask include:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What makes a successful person in performing this role?
  • What kind of challenges do you envision in this role?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like training on interview skills techniques and how to best answer typical standard and behavioural type questions?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with interview skills coaching to help with answering interview questions and promoting yourself to the employer. 

They also help with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

What is one approach that I can take in answering a behavioural based interview question? By Matthew Coppola


Most interviews these days will involve both standard and behavioural type interview questions being asked of the candidate. Standard type questions including that such as ‘Why should we hire you?’ and ‘What makes you the best person for this role?’ and so forth. Behavioural questions, on the other hand, are asked of the candidate to find out the approach that they took in a particular situation to accomplish a task or handle a matter.

Certainly, the example is important and would even be great if it was relevant to the role being interviewed for, but on many occasions, candidates simply cannot think of any relevant examples which makes it so important to both prepare for an interview and think about how your experience relates to each of the job duties and/or the key selection criteria.

Examples of behavioural questions include:

“Can you recall a time when you had a disagreement with a fellow colleague. What was the disagreement and how did you seek to resolve it?”

One approach to answering this behavioural question is to first start off by talking about the importance of resolving disagreements/conflicts with colleagues and how it can affect the workplace. Then proceed with an example using the STAR format.

S – Situation: What your role/company was and what the issue was.

T – Task: What was needed to be done?

A – Action: What approach did you take?

R – Result: What was the outcome?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

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Importance of displaying positive body language in an interview setting, by Matthew Coppola


Sometimes it doesn’t matter what we say or how we say something. Because if our body language – that is our physical mannerism and stature – does not match up with what we are saying, then the message that we are trying to get across will be skewered and misinterpreted.

In fact, research suggests that our body language accounts for upwards of 90% of our communication and what we are really trying to say.

This really is why it is so important to be aware of our own body language, particularly in an interview setting where the interviewer may be reading into everything we say and do in front of them.

I will address a couple areas where we need to be mindful of our body language in an interview setting:

Face to face sitting in front of an interviewer – This can be very daunting. We might feel as though we are being interrogated and there is a bright light shining in our eyes! Okay, I am exaggerating here. But the fact of the matter is, it’s not easy being in front of another person knowing full well that they are trying to make a decision on whether to hire you or not, and it all rests upon what you say and do.

So try to have an open posture and keep your hands clasped together. Don’t fidget. And if naturally, you are someone that uses your hands when talking, try to keep this minimal and relevant to what you are saying. Try to avoid crossing your arms or resting your hands on your legs like you are ready to finish up with the interview.

Facial expressions – Don’t be afraid to smile or show facial expressions. Obviously, don’t overdo it. But show a nice smile and use your facial expressions intermittingly.

To sit back or not. To lean forward or not. What should I do?? Help! – There is nothing wrong with sitting back or leaning forward. Or doing both intermittingly in the course of the interview. Just avoid slouching and coming across disinterested. If you are trying to make a point or elaborate on something, feel free to lean forward but not too much.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au

They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching-for-melbourne

They also assist former Australian Defence personnel and their partners with their job applications into civilian employment. Further details can be found at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/defencetransition

 

 

 

Ways you can sell yourself in the interview and on your resume


At the end of the day, no matter how good your resume is or how incredible your credentials and experience look on paper, what matters most is your ability to really sell yourself to the employer by demonstrating with solid evidence why you are a suitable candidate for the job. So I have put together a list of areas that you can focus on and highlight in your CV, covering letter and in the interview:

Your employment history

The employer wants to hear about how many years of experience you offer. What you did in those roles that are relevant to the job and being specific in explaining this.

Your education

Great, you have completed a course or tertiary qualification. Tell the employer about the units you studies, the results you achieved and what new skills you have gained from completing the course.

Improvements in percentages and numbers

Okay so you increased your performance targets. But what were those targets in numbers and what is the significance to the employer in reaching or exceeding those targets. What is the benchmark? Let’s get some figures mentioned.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions