Snapshot about the Interview Skills Coaching service offered by Client Centric


Keep calm by preparing for your next interview by receiving interview coaching from the experts.

Client Centric provide interview skills coaching to individuals seeking assistance in being able to market and promote themselves during an interview as well as be able to answer questions confidently and assertively.

Please visit the following page for more information:

https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching

Responding to the interview question: “How would your peers describe you?” By Matthew Coppola


How would your peers describe you?

Asking this question to an interviewee provides the employer with an insight from the candidate’s perspective on how their friends and peers see them, providing some kind of indication on what kind of person they are and what they will be like in the workplace.

When trying to find someone for the best fit for the team, asking this question is a good starting point.

My suggestion is to talk about the most positive, up building points that your peers would say about you and then explain why they would say those things.

Just saying that your peers think your the best person to go to when problems arise may not come across genuine, but backing it up with an example or further explanation will help create some kind of verification to what you are saying.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Responding to the interview question: “Why do you want this job?” By Matthew Coppola


Why do you want this job?

Fairly straight forward question, right?

For most people, the real reason why they want the job may not be exactly what they decide is appropriate in the interview to say.

How so?

Some of the real reasons for wanting the job are:

  • Unemployed – need to pay the bills and so having a job is high priority. 
  • More money/higher income and greater job challenges.
  • To be involved and part of the work force.
  • Really need a job to sustain a certain lifestyle.
  • Desire to be industrious, hard working and busy.

I have highlighted the main reasons which I believe are the most common.

But should you prefer to provide another reason other then what I have listed above, you may opt to say the following:

  • Role really interests me and is exactly what I am looking for to make next step in my career.
  • As much as I have thoroughly enjoyed my time in my currently role, I feel now after ____ years, I am ready for a change.
  • Since being made redundant/leaving my last role, I have been actively searching for work. This job is precisely what I am seeking.

Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Why we should never worry about candidates vying for the same job, by Matthew Coppola


Many individuals going for a job interview worry about the other candidates who will be interviewed too – thinking about what their competition is. But there is a good reason for not worrying and thinking about the other candidates vying for the same position.

With a small business, studies say to not worry about the competition and what they are doing. Yes, it is essential to be aware of what they do and what they charge, but not to worry about them.

The reason for this is that it distracts the business owner. It may cause discouragement, and instead of the attention going toward continual innovation and business improvement, the focus is going to the competition.

So the same goes for being interviewed. Don’t worry about the other candidates, and instead focus on what you have that makes you a valuable candidate for the role and how you can make a meaningful contribution.

So go into that interview with your head held high, confident that you can do the role and that they will want to hire you.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

How to deal with having a lack of industry experience, by Matthew Coppola


We’ve all heard it before. The typical response from an employer/recruiter saying that you lack industry experience. So, face with this issue, how do you deal with it?

Employers generally say this because they genuinely need someone who has experience in their industry, whether it be in the same role or a completely different position. Especially needed when a set of key selection criteria need to be addressed.

Every industry is different. Having an understanding of the industry, what the market is like, any regulations, policies or other intricacies of the industry can be very important to an employer. To them, you understand their business and their industry. They can relate better to you and discuss industry matters with you knowing full well that you have some level of familiarity with the sector that their business.

So, the question is, how do I respond to that answer?

You may decide to talk about your experience in another industry that is similar, and how it relates to their industry. But, that isn’t always easy.

The next step may be to obtain some work experience or volunteer your time in the industry that you need to gain exposure to. This may help and be beneficial to put on your resume.

Another option is to do a course/workshop/attend a conference relevant to that industry.

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Equipping yourself with a brand new tailored and personalised CV and cover letter can be a great way to improve your chances of getting noticed by a prospective employer.

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions – they have the expertise and experience to help clients from all different professions and trades, and all kinds of industries.

Visit their website today at:

www.clientcentric.com.au

How early should I arrive to an interview? By Matthew Coppola


Aim to arrive around 10 minutes early, that is, 10 minutes early from when you arrive to the reception desk. So, it would make sense then to arrive to the employer’s business site and park by about 20minutes early. That leaves enough time to find a parking spot, compose yourself, fix your suit and then walk into the front reception area.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would you like to be better prepared?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

What if I don’t have any questions to ask at the end of an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any questions to ask in an interview. You might be genuinely happy with everything that you have heard during the meeting and felt that there is nothing you want to ask.

But is this always the best approach to take? Think about it from the standpoint of the employer/recruiter.

Do they want you to have questions to ask? Generally speaking, most likely.

Why?

It shows a genuine interest in the position. It can help demonstrate that you are seriously considering the role and that you have paid attention to what has mentioned to you and you have a sound knowledge of the position thus far.

Asking questions such as:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What would you expect the prospective candidate to deliver in this role?
  • Are there any challenges that may be faced in this role?
  • Are there any areas of training/professional development that would make one further excel in this position?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

Is it necessary to bring a folio of certificates to show in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It is up to you if you want to bring a folio of certificates that you have completed over the course of your career.

Generally speaking though, it would be wise to include these certificates in your resume for an employer to refer to, instead than handing them a folio for them to sift through – which most likely will be brief.

One benefit to just listing them down is your CV is that it makes it easier for the interviewer to see all the certificates you have completed in one snapshot – the certificate name, year and issuer.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

How long should I wait to send a thank-you email after an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It’s always good to send a brief; follow-up thank you email after a job interview.

You may ask though ‘what am I thanking them for?’

Sending a thank you email that is brief and short is an excellent way to show your appreciation for being invited in for an interview and the fact that they have taken their time to interview you and considered you for the role. It also shows that you are genuinely interested in the position and that if they have any doubts as to your desire to be considered for the role, this will help confirm your keenness for the job.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

What kind of questions may I ask in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


Generally speaking, at the end of most interviews conducted, the prospective employer may ask the candidate if they have any questions before they conclude the interview.

It’s always best to have at least one or two questions to ask the employer. Too many questions can be off-putting, not enough questions or any at all may show disinterest in the role, or it may be perceived by the potential employer that the candidate has not taken much thought about the role.

Good questions to ask include:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What makes a successful person in performing this role?
  • What kind of challenges do you envision in this role?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like training on interview skills techniques and how to best answer typical standard and behavioural type questions?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with interview skills coaching to help with answering interview questions and promoting yourself to the employer. 

They also help with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

What is one approach that I can take in answering a behavioural based interview question? By Matthew Coppola


Most interviews these days will involve both standard and behavioural type interview questions being asked of the candidate. Standard type questions including that such as ‘Why should we hire you?’ and ‘What makes you the best person for this role?’ and so forth. Behavioural questions, on the other hand, are asked of the candidate to find out the approach that they took in a particular situation to accomplish a task or handle a matter.

Certainly, the example is important and would even be great if it was relevant to the role being interviewed for, but on many occasions, candidates simply cannot think of any relevant examples which makes it so important to both prepare for an interview and think about how your experience relates to each of the job duties and/or the key selection criteria.

Examples of behavioural questions include:

“Can you recall a time when you had a disagreement with a fellow colleague. What was the disagreement and how did you seek to resolve it?”

One approach to answering this behavioural question is to first start off by talking about the importance of resolving disagreements/conflicts with colleagues and how it can affect the workplace. Then proceed with an example using the STAR format.

S – Situation: What your role/company was and what the issue was.

T – Task: What was needed to be done?

A – Action: What approach did you take?

R – Result: What was the outcome?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

Interview Skills Coaching and Training | Australia Wide

Interview skills assistance in Melbourne, one – one support, interview preparation skills, career advice, career help, graduates, students, professionals.

Other states coaching provided in Sydney, Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra and Hobart.

Importance of displaying positive body language in an interview setting, by Matthew Coppola


Sometimes it doesn’t matter what we say or how we say something. Because if our body language – that is our physical mannerism and stature – does not match up with what we are saying, then the message that we are trying to get across will be skewered and misinterpreted.

In fact, research suggests that our body language accounts for upwards of 90% of our communication and what we are really trying to say.

This really is why it is so important to be aware of our own body language, particularly in an interview setting where the interviewer may be reading into everything we say and do in front of them.

I will address a couple areas where we need to be mindful of our body language in an interview setting:

Face to face sitting in front of an interviewer – This can be very daunting. We might feel as though we are being interrogated and there is a bright light shining in our eyes! Okay, I am exaggerating here. But the fact of the matter is, it’s not easy being in front of another person knowing full well that they are trying to make a decision on whether to hire you or not, and it all rests upon what you say and do.

So try to have an open posture and keep your hands clasped together. Don’t fidget. And if naturally, you are someone that uses your hands when talking, try to keep this minimal and relevant to what you are saying. Try to avoid crossing your arms or resting your hands on your legs like you are ready to finish up with the interview.

Facial expressions – Don’t be afraid to smile or show facial expressions. Obviously, don’t overdo it. But show a nice smile and use your facial expressions intermittingly.

To sit back or not. To lean forward or not. What should I do?? Help! – There is nothing wrong with sitting back or leaning forward. Or doing both intermittingly in the course of the interview. Just avoid slouching and coming across disinterested. If you are trying to make a point or elaborate on something, feel free to lean forward but not too much.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au

They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching-for-melbourne

They also assist former Australian Defence personnel and their partners with their job applications into civilian employment. Further details can be found at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/defencetransition

 

 

 

Ways you can sell yourself in the interview and on your resume


At the end of the day, no matter how good your resume is or how incredible your credentials and experience look on paper, what matters most is your ability to really sell yourself to the employer by demonstrating with solid evidence why you are a suitable candidate for the job. So I have put together a list of areas that you can focus on and highlight in your CV, covering letter and in the interview:

Your employment history

The employer wants to hear about how many years of experience you offer. What you did in those roles that are relevant to the job and being specific in explaining this.

Your education

Great, you have completed a course or tertiary qualification. Tell the employer about the units you studies, the results you achieved and what new skills you have gained from completing the course.

Improvements in percentages and numbers

Okay so you increased your performance targets. But what were those targets in numbers and what is the significance to the employer in reaching or exceeding those targets. What is the benchmark? Let’s get some figures mentioned.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Interview Question: Why do you want to work for our company?


One of the common questions an interviewer may ask concerns why you want to work for their company. It could ask be asked in another way such as, why did you apply for this role, what do you know about the company and why should we hire you.

The meaning uncovered

This is a typical question where the employer is trying to discern just how interested and keen you really are in working for them. They are looking to see how enthusiastic you really are. The employer may be interviewing 5 other candidates just like you, so they want someone who genuinely wants the role and will demonstrate this.

Difference between “enthusiastic” and “desperate”

You can come across enthusiastic by showing interest in the position, the company and the interviewer. You will come across desperate by having a great need or desire for getting the job, to the point that it goes overboard and makes the interviewer feel uncomfortable.

How you can show enthusiasm

You can show enthusiasm by asking questions about the company, saying things like “I can definitely see myself performing well in this role” or “This position is exactly what I am looking for”. Your body language will also come across that you are enthusiastic about the role and you can do this by leaning forward, nodding, smiling and maintaining eye contact.

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Author: Matthew Coppola

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Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions offers interview skills coaching and you can visit their web page by clicking here

Alternatively, if you are seeking employment and would like assistance with a new CV and Covering Letter, they also provide this service and you can view it by clicking here

This article can also be viewed here

Interview Skills Coaching and Training in Melbourne | Client Centric


We are proud to announce our new service – Interview skills coaching and training in Melbourne!

Are you as a jobseeker…

  • Nervous during interviews?
  • Unsure how to sell yourself?
  • Looking for one-one guidance?
  • Keen to make a good impression

It doesn’t matter what level of experience or skills you have, everyone can benefit from interview training.

Attending a job interview can seem like a really daunting exercise, but it need not to be. The nerves, anxieties and tensions that naturally flare up both before and during an interview can sometimes be too much for some, regardless of how skilled or experienced they are in their profession.

Here at Client Centric, we provide an one on one Interview Coaching and Training Service in Melbourne to help you gain the confidence needed to perform well at job interviews and overcome those nerves. The advice and suggestions will be tailored and specific to your needs.

We provide this service at your place of residence or another location within Melbourne that is preferable to you. We provide this service on weekends and out of business hours (after 5 pm) which gives you the flexibility and convenience.

Each session runs for about 1.5 hours however if you feel you would like a number of sessions we are happy to quote you accordingly. 

We provide practical, tailored one-on-one support and guidance that works.

Matthew Coppola will be your interview skills coach and trainer. He is very experienced and qualified to help and guide you.

With over 7 years’ experience in Recruitment, Employment Services and Corporate Training, Matthew has developed a wealth of knowledge and experience in resume writing, interview skills, job searching strategies, selection criteria writing and career planning. 

His approach to resume writing is to actually sell the individual, shine a light on their best qualities and powerfully market them to prospective employers.

Matthew holds a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development and a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics.

Tailored assistance for you. 

  • How to effectively make us of questioning techniques

  • How to start and end an interview and how to compose yourself when asked difficult questions

  • Ways you can build rapport with the interviewee/s

  • How to using probing techniques to find out more about the company and the job

  • How to read and understand the interviewee/s body language

  • How to communicate well and present yourself professionally – manage your own body language.

  • Typical questions you might be asked and what answers you can give.

  • Mock interview session and feedback provided about your performance.

  • Typical industry specific questions and scenarios that you might come across.

  • How to deal with group interviews and set yourself a part from the rest.

How to prepare questions to ask at your interview, by Matthew Coppola


SBeing asked questions at an interview can be like the media questioning a politiciano you have finally go the the interview stage and they tell you its next Monday at 4:00 pm. And you are excited as anything, probably throwing your fists  in the air, jumping up and down in hysterics! But then it dawns upon you that they are going to ask you serious questions and probe you to see how good you really are for the job. Remember that probably 5 other people also got the call and are being interviewed too. So you have some competition on your hands!

Next step is to start thinking and mentally preparing yourself for the questions that will come at you. Some may be directly related to your abilities and if you have what it takes. Some though will be indirect. You are there as a participant being interview, not an observer watching on the sidelines. The spotlight is on you! This is a meeting and like most meetings, every participant needs to prepare and especially if they are having a part in contributing to the discussion.

Get ahead of the competition (the other interviewees) by thinking about the kind of questions that would show you have a good understanding and knowledge of the employers’ business operations. Demonstrate that you have done your research and taken an active interest in them. After all, they are doing so for you!

You could say something along these lines (for a business real estate/operations management role:

From having a good look through your company website, I noticed that your management team are planning to acquire a new office block on county street in West Meadows. I am wondering will I be managing this acquisition or has this already been settled now?

This kind of questioning will demonstrate to the employer that you are already thinking about the job and what value you will add. It shows initiative and a desire to succeed. You are taking an interest in something that could affect your role!

So demonstrate and prove that you did your homework by asking specific and interesting questions about the role and the company.

 

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist & Resume Writing Expert.

With over 7 years’ experience in Recruitment, Employment Services and Corporate Training, Matthew has developed a wealth of knowledge and experience in resume writing, interview skills, job searching strategies, selection criteria writing and career planning. 

His approach to resume writing is to actually sell the individual, shine a light on their best qualities and powerfully market them to prospective employers. 

Matthew holds a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development and a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics.

 

Why it’s important to write a ‘thank you letter’ after your interview, by Matthew Coppola


It is very important and can even persuade a potential employer to hire you, by sending a thank you letter or email right after an interview. Most employers appreciate the effort and initiative taken by the interviewees when they follow up right after the interview. If you have an interview soon, my recommendation is to follow up with a brief and straight to the point note emailed to the employer, but do so within 24 hours of the meeting. Your resume got you to the interview. The interview will get you to the short-listing and consideration stage. The thank you letter will help you get you to the job offer stage.

Now just how much percentage increase in chance the follow up letter provides, well that’s debatable. Even a 1% increase is better than nothing!

A brief, concise, ‘no pressure to hire me’ thank you letter demonstrates that you take initiative and are genuinely interested in the employer, the job and your career. Its shows that you saw the interview not just being a numbers game, but a chance to work for a great employer in a job that you want to sink your feet in and stay there!

For help with resume writing, addressing and responding to key selection criteria, cover letter writing and more, please visit www.clientcentric.com.au

 

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist & Resume Writing Expert.

With over 7 years’ experience in Recruitment, Employment Services and Corporate Training, Matthew has developed a wealth of knowledge and experience in resume writing, interview skills, job searching strategies, selection criteria writing and career planning. 

His approach to resume writing is to actually sell the individual, shine a light on their best qualities and powerfully market them to prospective employers. 

Matthew holds a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development and a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics.

 

When should you bring up salary expectation?



I get asked this question a lot by my clients. When should I talk salary expectation? During the interview? Before or after? It’s like as if in our mind we think that if we start talking money, then it’s going to turn off the employer and we wont get the job. Well I have some good news! that is not true at all!

Employers first of all are not turned off by discussion of salary expectation once rapport has been built and they are aware of your strengths, weaknesses and at least it is nearing the end of the interview when you bring it up. If for example, the employer called you, said he/she received your resume and would like you to come in for an interview, and then you start saying how much money you expect to be paid, well that will certainly turn off the employer, for they haven’t even met you and do not want to commit to any salary negotiation until they have met you.

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Author: Matthew Coppola,  Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.