Responding to the interview question: “How would your peers describe you?” By Matthew Coppola


How would your peers describe you?

Asking this question to an interviewee provides the employer with an insight from the candidate’s perspective on how their friends and peers see them, providing some kind of indication on what kind of person they are and what they will be like in the workplace.

When trying to find someone for the best fit for the team, asking this question is a good starting point.

My suggestion is to talk about the most positive, up building points that your peers would say about you and then explain why they would say those things.

Just saying that your peers think your the best person to go to when problems arise may not come across genuine, but backing it up with an example or further explanation will help create some kind of verification to what you are saying.


Would you like interview skills coaching? Contact Client Centric.

Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

Dealing with nerves during a job interview, by Matthew Coppola


When conducting interview coaching, I am often asked by individuals about how they can deal with their nerves during a job interview.

They feel that that they get so nervous and flustered, that they forget what to say, have a ‘mental blank’ and end up either saying something brief and short, or talking extensively around the question.
 
Then, they feel what they have said isn’t right and start to question what the prospective employer will think of them besides what is written in the resume.
 
Has this ever happened to you?
 
Indeed, this has certainly happened to me, as you can read here.
 
Below is a list of my suggestions on how you may be able to better cope with those nerves during the interview:
 
  • Have an introduction to your response, finishing it off with a concluding remark.
  • If you have a glass of water in front of you, take regular sips before responding.
  • Slow down your responses – don’t feel you need to rush your answer.
  • Emphasise certain points, stress certain parts of what you are saying, then take a pause – this helps buy you some breathing space and will also encourage them to really meditate and digest on what you are saying and trying to get across.
  • Thoroughly prepare, prepare, prepare for your interview before hand.
  • Get an early nights rest before the day of your interview.
  • Arrive early to the employer’s location and take the time to sit down and relax.
  • Read through the job description before your interview and really think about how your skills and experience match with what they are asking for. By having a good understanding of what they are after, you will hopefully feel more confident in yourself and feel less of a surprise when questions are asked of you.
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If you are interested in receiving interview skills coaching, please do not hesitate to contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be very happy to help.
 

What if I don’t have any weaknesses when asked at an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any professional working weaknesses that you are aware of that hinder your ability to perform a job to the best you can. Many professionals and tradespersons perform their job very, very well and do not have any areas of concern that they feel they need to address or has been raised to them by a former supervisor or colleague.

So, you may decide to be upfront and honest that to your knowledge, there are no weaknesses that you can think of which need to be dealt with so that you can effectively undertake your duties.

Answering no when asked this question might not be the best approach to take.

Why is that?

I believe this may not be the best approach to take because a prospective employer/the recruiting agent may not entirely view it as truthfulness. But this is only an assumption. It may even impress them. We don’t know.

Another option to take is to think about an area of ‘professional development.’ that you would like to pursue. It might be to learn another language so that you can converse better with customers from other backgrounds, or it might be a challenge that you recently faced (ie. Being confident on the phone) but recently you have worked on this and it no longer presents itself as a ‘weakness’ as such.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

What if I don’t have any questions to ask at the end of an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any questions to ask in an interview. You might be genuinely happy with everything that you have heard during the meeting and felt that there is nothing you want to ask.

But is this always the best approach to take? Think about it from the standpoint of the employer/recruiter.

Do they want you to have questions to ask? Generally speaking, most likely.

Why?

It shows a genuine interest in the position. It can help demonstrate that you are seriously considering the role and that you have paid attention to what has mentioned to you and you have a sound knowledge of the position thus far.

Asking questions such as:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What would you expect the prospective candidate to deliver in this role?
  • Are there any challenges that may be faced in this role?
  • Are there any areas of training/professional development that would make one further excel in this position?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

Should I bring my resume along to an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It is entirely up to you.

You may want to have your resume as a form of reference – something that an interviewer can refer to, or if you are interviewed by a panel of interviewers, something that one individual can look at and read while the other interviewer is asking a question.

Even if they say that they have seen your resume, you can always place this beside you if it is not needed.

Sometimes the interviewer/s may forget certain aspects of your experience. They may have overlooked or not even thought about printing a copy of your resume to refer to during the interview. So bringing one or two copies of your resume may work in your favour.

It can also help as a talking point. But again, it is completely up to you. Some may opt not to. Others may decide to bring a thin folio with the CV/resume inside.

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Would you like to have your resume professionally revamped to help apply for a new job?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

Is it necessary to bring a folio of certificates to show in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It is up to you if you want to bring a folio of certificates that you have completed over the course of your career.

Generally speaking though, it would be wise to include these certificates in your resume for an employer to refer to, instead than handing them a folio for them to sift through – which most likely will be brief.

One benefit to just listing them down is your CV is that it makes it easier for the interviewer to see all the certificates you have completed in one snapshot – the certificate name, year and issuer.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

What is one approach that I can take in answering a behavioural based interview question? By Matthew Coppola


Most interviews these days will involve both standard and behavioural type interview questions being asked of the candidate. Standard type questions including that such as ‘Why should we hire you?’ and ‘What makes you the best person for this role?’ and so forth. Behavioural questions, on the other hand, are asked of the candidate to find out the approach that they took in a particular situation to accomplish a task or handle a matter.

Certainly, the example is important and would even be great if it was relevant to the role being interviewed for, but on many occasions, candidates simply cannot think of any relevant examples which makes it so important to both prepare for an interview and think about how your experience relates to each of the job duties and/or the key selection criteria.

Examples of behavioural questions include:

“Can you recall a time when you had a disagreement with a fellow colleague. What was the disagreement and how did you seek to resolve it?”

One approach to answering this behavioural question is to first start off by talking about the importance of resolving disagreements/conflicts with colleagues and how it can affect the workplace. Then proceed with an example using the STAR format.

S – Situation: What your role/company was and what the issue was.

T – Task: What was needed to be done?

A – Action: What approach did you take?

R – Result: What was the outcome?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

Interview Skills Coaching and Training | Australia Wide

Interview skills assistance in Melbourne, one – one support, interview preparation skills, career advice, career help, graduates, students, professionals.

Other states coaching provided in Sydney, Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra and Hobart.

Interview question: How would you deal with the resulting situation? By Matthew Coppola


During the interview, the prospective employer may pose a question about a scenario that may be problematic to see what your response would be to that situation and how you would manage it.

You are put under pressure to think then and there what it is that you would do in such a situation.

Before making a reply, think about exactly what it is that the employer is trying to find out and how that situation relates to the job that you are applying for.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website at: https://www.clientcentric.com.au

They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching-for-melbourne

Interview question: Why haven’t you gone further in your profession? By Matthew Coppola


The employer may be curious as to what your career goals are. Are you career driven? Or are you contempt with your current role? Or is there something holding you back from moving further in your profession.

Avoid taking it personal.

At the end of the day, you don’t really need to justify as to why you haven’t gone further in your career. There may be a multitude of reasons for this.

Maybe quite simply you are not career minded, nor do you have great expectations of yourself in the future. Maybe you are contempt with your current state of employment and the level of workload that you have is just enough to cope with.

Or it may be that you genuinely have tried to move up into a higher paying position with more responsibility. Your reasons for this may be varied too. But you have not been successful in moving up because either you don’t have the skills to or you don’t have enough experience that will meet the essential requirements of the new position.

 

Its best to show a contempt attitude with your current level of employment by talking about all your accomplishments, what you have learnt, how good you are at your job or certain aspects of it, and that you are happy either way whether you move up or stay in your current role and just do really well, that is, perfect your role.

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with give your best foot forward to an employer.

 They also assist with interview skills coaching either face to face or via online video link. For more information, please visit: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/interview-coaching

 Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au.

Interview Skills Coaching and Training in Melbourne | Client Centric


We are proud to announce our new service – Interview skills coaching and training in Melbourne!

Are you as a jobseeker…

  • Nervous during interviews?
  • Unsure how to sell yourself?
  • Looking for one-one guidance?
  • Keen to make a good impression

It doesn’t matter what level of experience or skills you have, everyone can benefit from interview training.

Attending a job interview can seem like a really daunting exercise, but it need not to be. The nerves, anxieties and tensions that naturally flare up both before and during an interview can sometimes be too much for some, regardless of how skilled or experienced they are in their profession.

Here at Client Centric, we provide an one on one Interview Coaching and Training Service in Melbourne to help you gain the confidence needed to perform well at job interviews and overcome those nerves. The advice and suggestions will be tailored and specific to your needs.

We provide this service at your place of residence or another location within Melbourne that is preferable to you. We provide this service on weekends and out of business hours (after 5 pm) which gives you the flexibility and convenience.

Each session runs for about 1.5 hours however if you feel you would like a number of sessions we are happy to quote you accordingly. 

We provide practical, tailored one-on-one support and guidance that works.

Matthew Coppola will be your interview skills coach and trainer. He is very experienced and qualified to help and guide you.

With over 7 years’ experience in Recruitment, Employment Services and Corporate Training, Matthew has developed a wealth of knowledge and experience in resume writing, interview skills, job searching strategies, selection criteria writing and career planning. 

His approach to resume writing is to actually sell the individual, shine a light on their best qualities and powerfully market them to prospective employers.

Matthew holds a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development and a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics.

Tailored assistance for you. 

  • How to effectively make us of questioning techniques

  • How to start and end an interview and how to compose yourself when asked difficult questions

  • Ways you can build rapport with the interviewee/s

  • How to using probing techniques to find out more about the company and the job

  • How to read and understand the interviewee/s body language

  • How to communicate well and present yourself professionally – manage your own body language.

  • Typical questions you might be asked and what answers you can give.

  • Mock interview session and feedback provided about your performance.

  • Typical industry specific questions and scenarios that you might come across.

  • How to deal with group interviews and set yourself a part from the rest.