What if I don’t have any weaknesses when asked at an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any professional working weaknesses that you are aware of that hinder your ability to perform a job to the best you can. Many professionals and tradespersons perform their job very, very well and do not have any areas of concern that they feel they need to address or has been raised to them by a former supervisor or colleague.

So, you may decide to be upfront and honest that to your knowledge, there are no weaknesses that you can think of which need to be dealt with so that you can effectively undertake your duties.

Answering no when asked this question might not be the best approach to take.

Why is that?

I believe this may not be the best approach to take because a prospective employer/the recruiting agent may not entirely view it as truthfulness. But this is only an assumption. It may even impress them. We don’t know.

Another option to take is to think about an area of ‘professional development.’ that you would like to pursue. It might be to learn another language so that you can converse better with customers from other backgrounds, or it might be a challenge that you recently faced (ie. Being confident on the phone) but recently you have worked on this and it no longer presents itself as a ‘weakness’ as such.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

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What if I don’t have any questions to ask at the end of an interview? By Matthew Coppola


You may not have any questions to ask in an interview. You might be genuinely happy with everything that you have heard during the meeting and felt that there is nothing you want to ask.

But is this always the best approach to take? Think about it from the standpoint of the employer/recruiter.

Do they want you to have questions to ask? Generally speaking, most likely.

Why?

It shows a genuine interest in the position. It can help demonstrate that you are seriously considering the role and that you have paid attention to what has mentioned to you and you have a sound knowledge of the position thus far.

Asking questions such as:

  • What is the workplace culture like?
  • What would you expect the prospective candidate to deliver in this role?
  • Are there any challenges that may be faced in this role?
  • Are there any areas of training/professional development that would make one further excel in this position?

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

 

 

Should I bring my resume along to an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It is entirely up to you.

You may want to have your resume as a form of reference – something that an interviewer can refer to, or if you are interviewed by a panel of interviewers, something that one individual can look at and read while the other interviewer is asking a question.

Even if they say that they have seen your resume, you can always place this beside you if it is not needed.

Sometimes the interviewer/s may forget certain aspects of your experience. They may have overlooked or not even thought about printing a copy of your resume to refer to during the interview. So bringing one or two copies of your resume may work in your favour.

It can also help as a talking point. But again, it is completely up to you. Some may opt not to. Others may decide to bring a thin folio with the CV/resume inside.

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Would you like to have your resume professionally revamped to help apply for a new job?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

Is it necessary to bring a folio of certificates to show in an interview? By Matthew Coppola


It is up to you if you want to bring a folio of certificates that you have completed over the course of your career.

Generally speaking though, it would be wise to include these certificates in your resume for an employer to refer to, instead than handing them a folio for them to sift through – which most likely will be brief.

One benefit to just listing them down is your CV is that it makes it easier for the interviewer to see all the certificates you have completed in one snapshot – the certificate name, year and issuer.

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Do you have an interview coming up and would like one-on-one coaching?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that provides interview skills coaching, assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

The question in an interview “What pay rate are you looking for?”


You’re all excited about an up and coming interview lined up for you. The day comes, you put on your best clothes and head off for the job interview. During the interview, they may ask you what pay rate you are looking for. This is not something that you haven’t thought about. It’s serious and the pay means a lot to you. It’s the reward that you will receive for all your hard work, taking into account your skills and knowledge as well as the appropriate rate for your industry and level of position. So you might say to them a particular rate you are after, or what you were on in your last role. Some people prefer to say that they don’t have a particular rate of pay in mind, but would like to negotiate.

Whatever you say, the interviewer may just look down at your resume, think about your experience and how much they are willing to pay, then may either mention this to you or say that they will discuss it should you be successful for the position. You leave the interview feeling pretty confident.

A day later, they call you up saying that you have been successful for the position and what they are willing to pay. You negotiate over the phone and soon, come to an agreement.

Interview Question: Why do you want to work for our company?


One of the common questions an interviewer may ask concerns why you want to work for their company. It could ask be asked in another way such as, why did you apply for this role, what do you know about the company and why should we hire you.

The meaning uncovered

This is a typical question where the employer is trying to discern just how interested and keen you really are in working for them. They are looking to see how enthusiastic you really are. The employer may be interviewing 5 other candidates just like you, so they want someone who genuinely wants the role and will demonstrate this.

Difference between “enthusiastic” and “desperate”

You can come across enthusiastic by showing interest in the position, the company and the interviewer. You will come across desperate by having a great need or desire for getting the job, to the point that it goes overboard and makes the interviewer feel uncomfortable.

How you can show enthusiasm

You can show enthusiasm by asking questions about the company, saying things like “I can definitely see myself performing well in this role” or “This position is exactly what I am looking for”. Your body language will also come across that you are enthusiastic about the role and you can do this by leaning forward, nodding, smiling and maintaining eye contact.

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Author: Matthew Coppola

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Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions offers interview skills coaching and you can visit their web page by clicking here

Alternatively, if you are seeking employment and would like assistance with a new CV and Covering Letter, they also provide this service and you can view it by clicking here

This article can also be viewed here

Why we feel nervous on the first day of a new job, by Matthew Coppola



Yesterday I started my first day on the job at a job find company in Victoria. Although it was only an internal transfer for the same position with the same company, I still felt nervous, timid and shy around my new fellow colleagues. I understand now just what its like for my job seekers when they start a new job. The emotions that they would be going through and how hard it can be to get back into the workforce especially if they have been out of work for quite some time. It is a big change and can be a stressful period in ones life.  Similar to the emotions involved in moving houses, changing jobs is just as stressful, if not worse. But why is it that we feel nervous on the first day on the job?

There are number of reasons why we feel nervous on the first day of our new job. Even today I had first hand experience with what it felt like to start working in a new office with new coworkers I have never met before until today. It was extremely nerve racking. I made the biggest mistake in the beginning. I accidentally arrived to work late and so I was stressed in the morning to begin with. I now see why it is extremely important to go visit the new workplace before a job start, say the day before, so then in the morning you wont be stressed and will know exactly how long it will take to get to work and where to park. But thankfully I soon forgot about being late after apologizing and explaining my reason why. I was also nervous because everyone knew eachother and they had built up this team culture and felt so comfortable around eachother. But I realized that they werent going to change to fit in with me. I had to change to fit in with them. I made sure that I introduced myself to everyone in the office and that I joined in with conversation and laughter the team were having. Because I made the effort to be part of their team culture, they made the effort to warmly welcome me.

Then by the end of the day it struck me! I finally realized why we always feel nervous when starting a new job. Its because it means change for us and moving away from what we are familiar with. In Psychology, we learn that the brain loves the familiar. When we move out of our comfort zone it can create a real shock to our brain. For instance, why is it that we always feel comfortable in our own bed then in someone else? And its for that very reason. So to really overcome the tensions and anxieties in starting a new job, we need to make an earnest effort to get to know our fellow colleagues and show interest in the workplace environment and culture.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.