“Effective job hunting is about making tailored job applications that match the vacancy and employer” By Matthew Coppola


Please take a moment now to think about the heading of this article:

“Effective job hunting is about making tailored job applications that match the vacancy and employer”

Job hunting means to be actively looking and applying for work. Scouring job vacancy websites and apps to find the right job or one that you are interested in doing. You like the employer and the job and feel that you are well suited to the position. More often than not however, many will send out job applications one after the other, with a standard covering letter, generalist resume and a couple sentences in the email saying that they are interested in the position and all about them. That’s right, all about them. 

Well it shouldn’t be all about the job seeker but rather all about the resume. You do not need to elaborate on everything you have done in your 20 year career. Rather, talk about the experience that relates to the job.

Many people send out job applications that are not tailored for the position and that actively addresses the employer’s interests. If you are a fire fighter but want to work in an accounts office, well then you wouldn’t send your firefighting resume and talk about how many fires you have eliminated when writing your job application. No, rather you would change your resume for office work and address the requirements for the position and how you feel your skills and experience would add value in that position and for the employer in meeting their business goals.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Holding a graduate degree in Commerce, majoring in Economics at Curtin University, as well as a post graduate certificate in Career Education and Development at RMIT University, Matthew brings with him more than 6 years experience working in the fields of business development, marketing, soft-skills training and employment services industry. He has gained significant exposure in working with employers in sourcing staff as well as assisting jobseekers in promoting and marketing themselves to employers and securing sustainable employment outcomes. He is currently working in Disability Employment Services where he assists clients with mental health disabilities in finding and keeping satisfying and gainful employment and helping them overcome and work around barriers to employment. 

He has helped many job seekers secure employment by training and coaching them in the art of being interviewed and giving the interviewer a positive and lasting impression. He knows how to sell and market a job seeker to an employer and he imparts this knowledge to his clients in helping them sell and market themselves in an interview.

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Avoid lying in your resume – it will bite you back later!


We may feel that putting a little so called “white lie” on our resume will be harmless and we will justify this by saying to ourselves “I am only pronouncing my experience”. But what were really are doing is lying to ourselves and to the employer. Avoid lying in your resume, it will bite you back later!

Here are 5 reasons why it’s best to avoid lying on your resume:

1. Most important of all – it’s illegal to do so and can result in your immediate dismissal. In fact it really isn’t fair on the other candidates who are in competition with each other. If one or people lie on their resume, it makes it really unfair competition in being considered for employment.

2. Employers will do reference checks on your resume as standard procedure. They will ask your referees about what you did and clarify with them if it is true and correct.

3. If you are asked to do something at work that you said in your resume you could do, only to not be able to do it, is embarrassing and very awkward. The employer or your manager will catch on.

4. A lie is a lie. No such thing as a white lie. You either worked for that particular employer in that role, or you didn’t. There is no in between.

Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

If you need a new CV and Covering Letter, without the lies! Please visit: http://www.clientcentric.com.au/#!resume-writing-services/ck40

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Perth Resume Writing Services


Don’t risk having your CV thrown into the rubbish bin because it failed to impress. We will write and design you a professionally written resume and cover letter that will make you stand out with an eye catching design and punchy content!

The work that we do in designing, structuring and re-writing for immediate impact will ensure the recruitment consultant and hiring manager continues to read more. The work that we do for you involves:

  • Proof-reading for grammar and punctuation checks.
  • Designing the resume to look professional and be highly presentable.
  • Writing a short, captivating summary that identifies you in your field and promotes you.
  • Writing the resume to market and sell you to the prosepctive employer.
  • Conducting research to find out what employers are currently looking for in your field and making sure the resume addresses their requirements and your experience is made relevant.
  • Creating a detailed  resume but not cluttering it – we make sure that everything is in structure.
  • We put headlines for better reading and to draw the employers attention.
  • We also use industry specific vocabulary and terms employers are using and appropriately include these in the resume and covering letter.

A covering letter is a very important aspect of the job application process and can be the difference between your resume being discarded and obtaining an interview. We make sure that the covering letter is in sync with your resume and allows you to make a small tailored adjustment to the company name/contact person and short summary stating why you want to work for that company specifically, and then the rest is all pre-populated, ready to go.

Our strategy is one of quality over quantity,  ensuring your covering letter has a high impact effect, just like the resume will. We take a great deal of time and effort in making sure our work is of a very high standard.

 All of our work is original and tailored to the client. We spend time and effort in ensuring that your resume really sells and markets you to any prospective employer.

Our contact with you will be primarily by phone and email as we work with clients all over Australia and some of our clients may already be working which makes it hard logistically to meet.

“”Hi Matt, just wanted to say a big thank you for all your help with my c.v and covering letter I got permenancy which means I never need to go through that horrible process ever again.. Big thanks.”

Hazel M, Teacher’s Aide

 “Awesome Matt! Great job! Thank you so so much 🙂 I really want this job so feeling a lot more confident- now you have done such an awesome job”

 Tania F, Senior Anaesthetic Technician

 Simple and easy process from consultation to delivery.

Initial consultation.

We make initial contact with you by phone/email for a brief discussion regarding the services you require and any specific requests. We also discuss your background and experience and what direction you would like your career to head.

Preparation.

We then ask if you can send us your existing resume and if any supporting documentation (ie. Employer testimonials, qualifications and grades, referees, etc) along with a couple links to jobs on Seek.com.au that you wish to apply for.

Contact.

Once we have all the information we need we can proceed, but if there is anytime else we need to know we will get in contact with you

Payment.

Full payment will need to be made upfront to confirm your booking.

Timeframe.

Depending on current workload, we usually ask for around 3 – 4 working days to have the final draft back you for your review.

Delivery.

We will send the documents to you ready for your review and to see if you would like any changes or additions made and we will make them accordingly.

Revision.

Once you have made your review of the new resume and covering letter, we then make those changes, send it back to you and commence working on the next service paid for (ie. Job application service or LinkedIn prof

Video tutorials on how we write our Resumes – Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions


 

 

http://www.clientcentric.com.au/#!video_tips/cdvr

Matthew Coppola – Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist and Resume Writing Expert


Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist & Resume Writing Expert.

Holding  over 7 years’ experience in Recruitment, Employment Services and Corporate Training, I have developed a wealth of knowledge and experience in resume writing, interview skills, job searching strategies, selection criteria writing and career planning. My approach to resume writing is to actually sell the individual, shine a light on their best qualities and powerfully market them to prospective employers. I possess a Graduate Certificate in Career Education and Development and a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Economics.  

Please visit our website for more information. At Client Centric, we deliver career and employment solutions for  jobseekers and employers throughout the employment lifecycle.

We offer a variety of employment and HR services including Resume & Cover Letter Writing,  Career Education and Training, Assistance with responding to Key Selection Criteria, Search Word Optimised LinkedIn Profiles, Outplacement and Career Transitioning Services, Reverse Marketing and Key Staff Biographies.

Our expertise includes Sales & Marketing, Transport & Logistics, Manufacturing & Operations, Healthcare & Education, Community Service & Non-Profit, Engineering & Technical, Office Administration, Energy & Utilities and Mining & Resources.

We service clients in every capital city in Australia and regional areas throughout Melbourne, Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide, Darwin, Sydney,Hobart, Canberra and the Gold Coast.

If you need a specialist Resume Writer to write you a new and personalised Resume or would like assistance with addressing the Selection Criteria. look no further than Client Centric for your employment needs.

Why should you research the employer before being interviewed?


Matthew Coppola is an Australian Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist and Resume Writing Expert. If you are interested in having him as a speaker or utilising any of his services, please contact him by clicking here.

Going for an interview is like going out on a date with someone.  Now both are similar for many reasons, but generally speaking, if you went out on a date with someone and it wasn’t a blind date, you would be more prepared and confident if you knew a bit about the person with whom you were about have dinner or a drink with.

That kind of research might entail conversations with friends among other things. What if your friends told you that she was no good, she would hurt you and she is untrustworthy. And this is from multiple sources including  Facebook page where you see her photos and posts with are in line with the reputation your friends gave her.

Armed with this information and research, how do you now feel about this date? Well not only would you be uncertain about her but you would be more prepared with what kind of questions you want to ask her and you would not let her pretty looks cloud any of your judgement! So research is key to being prepared and confident!

Same with having an interview with an employer.

It’s always best to find out everything you can about the companies you want to work for including: their product lines, competitors, prices, growth prospects, organisational structure, employment policies, key staff and overseas trends and developments which may affect local operations.

You can find this information in places like:

  • annual reports;
  • customer newsletters;
  • trade magazines;
  • product brochures and catalogues;
  • sales representatives.

The best way to approach this is speaking in person to someone who works there or knows someone who does. This is where your personal contact list will be important and this can be found through online sources like LinkedIn, a professional networking website where you can connect and message professionals in your industry.

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Author: Matthew Coppola

Matthew Coppola – Employment Advisor

BComm(Econs), GradCert (CE&D)

Matthew Coppola has more than 6 years’ experience in the recruitment, staffing and training industries with a focus on employment services, specifically Job Services Australia and Disability Employment Services.  He has experience in business development, marketing, sales and training.

Common Interview Questions – A Brief Overview


Matthew Coppola is an Australian Careers Advisor, Employment Specialist and Resume Writing Expert. If you are interested in having him as a speaker or utilising any of his services, please contact him by clicking here.

Common Interviewing Questions

1 – Tell me about yourself.
This seems to be an innocent enough question. But be aware that Interviewers often ask this as an invitation for you to share your life story or personal information. Interviewers often want to know personal details like your age and marital status. So this question often elicits background information such as when you graduated high school or college, your marital status, number of children, etc. When you hear the tell-me-about-yourself question, think of how you can answer with details about your prior work experience, abilities and professional accomplishments that will fit this job.

2 – What else should I know about you?
If the “tell-me-about-yourself” question doesn’t prompt you to reveal personal statements, later in the interview (when you have been lulled into complacency), the interviewer often asks this question. Reiterate why you are the best fit for the job. No personal info is required. It’s up to you what private details you reveal.

3 – Why should we hire you?
Talk about a job where you used skills you believe will be necessary in this job. Point out how your skills or experience meet the needs of the organization.

You can say, “Because I am the best candidate for the job,” as long as you add the reasons that make you the best candidate. Be confident and enthusiastic and emphasize several reasons why you should be hired. “I’ve got extensive experience in (whatever) with the specific skills you are looking for. I’m a fast learner who has learned to adapt quickly to change …” Give examples to back up your statements that demonstrate your unique qualifications.

4 – What are your weaknesses?
One/ of the secrets to answering this question is being honest about a weakness, but at the same time, demonstrating how you have turned it into a strength. For example, if you had a problem organizing your work in the past, demonstrate the steps you took to more effectively keep yourself on track. This will show that you have the ability to recognize aspects of yourself that need improvement, and the initiative to improve.

Do not say, “I don’t have any weaknesses,” or “I am a bit of a perfectionist.” Those answers will turn off interviewers. They know the first is probably untrue and the second is impossible. Being a little bit of a perfectionist is like being a little bit of a liar. Better to use a weakness that is really something you are trying to learn like a foreign language or a new software program. Make sure that any weakness you talk about is not a key element of the position.

5 – What is your greatest strength?
This is your opportunity to highlight your best skills. Focus on your top three or four. Examples would be: “my leadership skills, problem-solving ability, team-building skills, interpersonal skills, ability to work under pressure, professional expertise, ability to resolve conflict” and so on. Be prepared to offer examples for each skill you mention.

9 – Where do you see yourself five years from now?
If you say, “In your job,” you have shot yourself in the foot. Interviewers ask this question because they want to hire people who are focused on specific professional goals. Vague works best. “In five years I expect to have more responsibility and new, exciting challenges.”

Do not indicate that you hope to start your own business, change careers, or go back to school. Such responses indicate a lack of long-term interest in the organization. Keep in mind that throughout the interview, the interviewer is trying to discover if you are a good fit and can make a positive contribution in the job.

10 – Why do you want to work here?
“Because you have a job,” won’t win any points for you. Instead, use this question to talk about what you know about the company, and how your background and experience relate to issues they may have. This shows the interviewer that you have done your homework and at the same time, gives you another opportunity to show how your qualifications and experience match the job. “What I can bring to this job is six years experience and knowledge of the industry, plus my ability to build and sustain patient relationships …”

11 – Why did you leave your last job?
If you lost your last job because of downsizing, restructuring, the company closing, etc., say: “I didn’t leave my last job. My job left me.”

If you left on your own accord, do not say anything negative about your former company, boss, or co-workers. You might say: “There were many aspects of my job that were rewarding but I believe this new position will give me the opportunity to contribute even more.”

12 – What did you dislike most about your last job?
If you loved your last job, say: “What I dislike most is that it ended.” If you didn’t love your last job, do not say anything negative. Instead, use a variation of the statement: “There were many aspects of my job that were rewarding.”

13 – What is a weakness you still have?
A negative question again. Repeat a “weakness” you may have used earlier that indicates how you are working to learn something new.

18 – What salary are you looking for?
Negotiating salary can be a minefield if you aren’t prepared. This strategy is an excerpt: “Do not disclose your salary history or the salary you are seeking. Instead, ask: ‘What is the range for this position?’ You focus continuously on asking for the range, not the salary. When you disclose, you lose the power of negotiation.”

Behavioral Interviewing Questions

Behavioral interviewing focuses on the candidate’s actions and behaviors and therefore minimizes the personal impressions that can affect hiring choices. This style of interviewing is based on the premise that the best, most effective way to predict your future behavior is to determine your past behavior.

These questions ask about what you have done in previous jobs, not what you would do. You will know it is a behavioral question when the past tense is used. “What did you do … Tell me about how you handled … Describe a time when …”

19 – Describe a problem situation and how you solved it.
If you had responsibility in your previous jobs, you can describe a work situation where you were responsible for turning it around. If you do not have professional experience, describe something like prioritizing your schedule and making to-do lists to give you enough time to study. Regardless of the issue involved, you demonstrate that you can think critically and develop a solution.

20 – Describe how you handled a stressful situation in the past.
Give an example of how you used your problem-solving or decision-making skills to reduce stress. An example might be that you learned the value of a time-out for both yourself and your staff. Or if it’s true, how you actually seem to work better under pressure and deadlines.

21 – Tell me what has been your greatest work-related accomplishment?
Choose an example that was important to you and also helped your company. Give specific details about what you did, how you did it, and what the results were. Talk about an accomplishment that relates to the position you are seeking. Interviewers like to hear about accomplishments that reduced expenses, raised revenue, solved problems or enhanced a company’s reputation.

22 – How did you keep current and informed about your job/industry?
The interviewer is concerned that once you get the job will you continue to learn and grow? You could say, “I stay on top of what is happening in my industry by reading newspapers, magazines and journals. I am a member of several professional organizations and continually network with colleagues at the meetings. Whenever possible I take classes and attend seminars that offer new information or technology.”