How far should I go back to in my resume? By Matthew Coppola


Although every candidate’s application and background will vary in determining how far you’re your resume should go, in general terms usually the past ten to fifteen years is a reasonable time frame to go back. Any time before that can list as an outline.

The main point to be aware of is not to make the resume too long and lengthy. Generally speaking, a reasonable length of a resume maximum 4-6 pages long depends on the complexity and scope of the candidate’s background.

The main point to take away from this is to be mindful of the person who is reading your application and their time.

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Are you interested in having your resume and cover letter professionally revamped and written? 

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

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Is there any need to include colours in my resume? By Matthew Coppola


Colours can be an expression of creativity and certainly for a creative type resume, making use of colours and imagery of the individual’s work may actually help with their application – but it is more about showcasing their work. So, then, do colours really make a difference?

Personally, I don’t think so.

The question we want to ask ourselves, is an employer really going to choose one resume over the other because they liked the candidate’s use of the colour blue?

Again, personally, I don’t think so.

The use of black and white colours helps to make the resume look more professional and easy to read. Colours can be a distraction from what is actually written.

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Are you interested in having your resume professionally revamped and written? 

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

“Effective job hunting is about making tailored job applications that match the vacancy and employer” By Matthew Coppola


Please take a moment now to think about the heading of this article:

“Effective job hunting is about making tailored job applications that match the vacancy and employer”

Job hunting means to be actively looking and applying for work. Scouring job vacancy websites and apps to find the right job or one that you are interested in doing. You like the employer and the job and feel that you are well suited to the position. More often than not however, many will send out job applications one after the other, with a standard covering letter, generalist resume and a couple sentences in the email saying that they are interested in the position and all about them. That’s right, all about them. 

Well it shouldn’t be all about the job seeker but rather all about the resume. You do not need to elaborate on everything you have done in your 20 year career. Rather, talk about the experience that relates to the job.

Many people send out job applications that are not tailored for the position and that actively addresses the employer’s interests. If you are a fire fighter but want to work in an accounts office, well then you wouldn’t send your firefighting resume and talk about how many fires you have eliminated when writing your job application. No, rather you would change your resume for office work and address the requirements for the position and how you feel your skills and experience would add value in that position and for the employer in meeting their business goals.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Holding a graduate degree in Commerce, majoring in Economics at Curtin University, as well as a post graduate certificate in Career Education and Development at RMIT University, Matthew brings with him more than 6 years experience working in the fields of business development, marketing, soft-skills training and employment services industry. He has gained significant exposure in working with employers in sourcing staff as well as assisting jobseekers in promoting and marketing themselves to employers and securing sustainable employment outcomes. He is currently working in Disability Employment Services where he assists clients with mental health disabilities in finding and keeping satisfying and gainful employment and helping them overcome and work around barriers to employment. 

He has helped many job seekers secure employment by training and coaching them in the art of being interviewed and giving the interviewer a positive and lasting impression. He knows how to sell and market a job seeker to an employer and he imparts this knowledge to his clients in helping them sell and market themselves in an interview.

This article can be viewed by clicking here

The 5 signs of a quality build CV, by Matthew Coppola


As it gets harder and harder to secure employment and stand out from other job candidates, it is becoming increasingly important to have a powerful resume that really sells and markets your skills and abilities to prospective employers.

Here are 5 signs of what makes a quality CV:

1. It is specific

Is your resume effectively marketing you toward one particular type of industry or role? Or does your CV have little direction about what career you are heading towards and how you define yourself in your field?

2. It is well written and structured. 

The CV must flow and be readable. Employers have limited time reading your resume so you want to make sure that it has clear headings, bullet points, and is in order from your name to the selling summary then competencies and your education and training and so forth.

3. It expands on your skills and experience and clearly outlines your success. 

Mention some of your notable achievements both at work/school. If you have recently graduated, make sure that the CV reflects the grades you achieved and some successful projects you completed. A brief summary will be sufficient.

For every job role, make a list underneath it of your achievements with that employer/in that position.

4. It is readable.

Does it sound clear to you when your read it aloud? Does it make sense? This is important. You want to impress the person looking at your CV with your exceptional skills in your attention to detail.

5. It is personalised.

Make sure that it is tailored for the positions that you are applying for. Use key words employers in the industry are looking for and make sure that your CV is a good reflection of what is best practice/desirable in the industry.

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Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

For information on professional CV writing services, please visit http://www.clientcentric.com.au/#!resume-writing-services/ck40

You can also view this article by clicking here

Should I put my referee’s contact details on my resume or not?


Recently I was asked by a client what is best practice,when it comes to putting the contact details of their referees, on their resume. Some argue that if you do include their phone number, the prospective employer may call them without you knowing and catch the referee person off guard. Some feel that it might cause “bad feelings” and put off the referee from ever in the future providing advice. Well it really is a personal preference but when I write resumes for my clients, I do include the contact details and phone numbers but have an asterix (*) after the referees which says:

*Please advise me first before making contact.

From past experience in communication with employers, I feel that it can be annoying for them if they have to ask you for the contact number, then the time that takes can be consuming, especially if you don’t have their contact details on hand right away. So by having the details and that asterix, it allows the employer to make that quick confirmation call, allows you to quickly advise your referees and the reference call is made as soon as possible!

I have a video on-line entitled: “Should I have referees available upon request” and this can be viewed by clicking here

If you are interested in having a new resume written, assistance with responding to key selection criteria, I welcome you to visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au

What Makes a Good Resume Stand Out?


Time and time again I have clients asking me that they apply for so many jobs but they never hear back from an employer. Some have even applied for jobs to only minutes later receive an email saying that their application has been unsuccessful. They then ask themselves “Did the employer even bother looking at my resume??” The unfortunate explanation is no they did not fully consider your resume because they would have been inundated with hundreds if not thousands of resumes put forward for the job but your resume did not make the cut.

So then what makes a good resume stand out from the rest? Well firstly it needs to captivate the audience. Your name should be large and the focal point at the top of your resume. Then underneath that should be a good summary about you and what you have to offer to an employer. This is the part where you sell yourself. That’s resume, writing a resume and applying for a job is a selling game. You are the product. You also are the salesman.

A good salesman knows his products. He knows the ins and outs. He is prepared for whatever question comes his way and ready for any form of criticism. He believes in product is firm in the belief that his product is one of the best.

So there is your answer. A good resume is one that sells you to the employer. That’s what will make you stand out from the rest because most people simply do not know how to sell themselves and that is where the people who get the jobs succeed in life. They know how to sell themselves.

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Author: Matthew Coppola,  Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

What Does The “Generation Gap” Mean?



The phrase “generation gap” implies that a great chasm exists between the old and the young, and that it must be immensely difficult to overcome. Kingsley Davis first wrote about it (in a business sense) in 1940. He thought that rapid social change was responsible for this parent-child-youth type of conflict. His initial article spurred a massive amount of research about the generation gap, with a range of results.

There is a perception that one generation is vastly different from the other in terms of values, attitudes, and lifestyle; that cross-generationally, we do not have things in common. When we step back and really examine the situation however, although the conditions do exist, they are actually not that common. What we see are the ways that previous generations have great influence on younger generations despite also having differences, and the ongoing idea that each generation cannot possibly meet the needs of the other.

As a result, we need to view the gap as something that is far shallower and less confrontational than the media or business writers generally portray. In reality, both in the workplace and at home, there is lots of reciprocity between the generations, especially once they come to know and understand one another, even just a little.

The presence of difference comes out of several things that we know for sure. For example, there are currently four, and sometimes even five generations, working in one place. Each generation has specific defining characteristics about how they approach life, not just work.

Here is the breakdown:

Silent Generation (sometimes called Radio Babies), born 1930-1945.
Baby Boomers, born 1946-1964 in the US, to 1966 in Canada, to 1971 in the United Kingdom.
Generation X, born 1965-1976.
Generation Y, born 1977-1985.
Millennials, born 1986 and later.

There was a period in the late 1990s when managers would hire just about anyone with a heartbeat to fill a position. At that time, the United States was short approximately three to four million workers. By 2010, they will be short 10 million workers because the shift of Baby Boomers out of the workforce will continue, and there are far less people coming behind them.

In addition to what is a purely physical numbers game, there are other things to consider. About 80% of people in the workforce don’t want to go to work at the beginning of their workweek, and 97% of them would change occupations if they became financially independent.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.