How many words should my responses be to the key selection criteria? By Matthew Coppola


So, as part of your application you need to address a set of key selection criteria. How long should your responses be?

Firstly, my suggestion is to find out if the employer/recruiter has asked for a certain number of words per response or how many pages your application should be. Will help you determine the length and size of your answers.

However, as a rule of thumb, my suggestion is to stay around 300-350 words per criteria. Or best to stay less than half a page long, with multiple paragraphs rather than a couple of long paragraphs that may be a little difficult to read.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in your career to date? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help.

www.clientcentric.com.au

 

What size font is best suited to a resume? By Matthew Coppola


So, you want to make sure that your resume can be easily read. What size font is best suited for a resume and cover letter?

My suggestion is size 10 font for the CV, and either size 10 or size 11 font for the cover letter.

Generally speaking, most job applications are viewed online, rather then printed out and read in paper form. The reason being is that a recruiter/employer may receive hundreds of applications. In the interests of saving paper/environmental sustainability and cost reduction (costs in paper and ink), they may opt to just view the application documents online.

Viewing documents on a computer screen allows you to expand and zoom in on the document, depending on the reader’s preference.


Would you like a new and tailored resume and cover letter that helps to highlight the valuable skills and experience you have gained in past roles? Would you like assistance addressing key selection criteria?

Why not contact the team at Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions. They would be happy to help. 

www.clientcentric.com.au

How far should I go back to in my resume? By Matthew Coppola


Although every candidate’s application and background will vary in determining how far you’re your resume should go, in general terms usually the past ten to fifteen years is a reasonable time frame to go back. Any time before that can list as an outline.

The main point to be aware of is not to make the resume too long and lengthy. Generally speaking, a reasonable length of a resume maximum 4-6 pages long depends on the complexity and scope of the candidate’s background.

The main point to take away from this is to be mindful of the person who is reading your application and their time.

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Are you interested in having your resume and cover letter professionally revamped and written? 

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

Is there any need to include colours in my resume? By Matthew Coppola


Colours can be an expression of creativity and certainly for a creative type resume, making use of colours and imagery of the individual’s work may actually help with their application – but it is more about showcasing their work. So, then, do colours really make a difference?

Personally, I don’t think so.

The question we want to ask ourselves, is an employer really going to choose one resume over the other because they liked the candidate’s use of the colour blue?

Again, personally, I don’t think so.

The use of black and white colours helps to make the resume look more professional and easy to read. Colours can be a distraction from what is actually written.

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Are you interested in having your resume professionally revamped and written? 

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writing, addressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

“Effective job hunting is about making tailored job applications that match the vacancy and employer” By Matthew Coppola


Please take a moment now to think about the heading of this article:

“Effective job hunting is about making tailored job applications that match the vacancy and employer”

Job hunting means to be actively looking and applying for work. Scouring job vacancy websites and apps to find the right job or one that you are interested in doing. You like the employer and the job and feel that you are well suited to the position. More often than not however, many will send out job applications one after the other, with a standard covering letter, generalist resume and a couple sentences in the email saying that they are interested in the position and all about them. That’s right, all about them. 

Well it shouldn’t be all about the job seeker but rather all about the resume. You do not need to elaborate on everything you have done in your 20 year career. Rather, talk about the experience that relates to the job.

Many people send out job applications that are not tailored for the position and that actively addresses the employer’s interests. If you are a fire fighter but want to work in an accounts office, well then you wouldn’t send your firefighting resume and talk about how many fires you have eliminated when writing your job application. No, rather you would change your resume for office work and address the requirements for the position and how you feel your skills and experience would add value in that position and for the employer in meeting their business goals.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

Holding a graduate degree in Commerce, majoring in Economics at Curtin University, as well as a post graduate certificate in Career Education and Development at RMIT University, Matthew brings with him more than 6 years experience working in the fields of business development, marketing, soft-skills training and employment services industry. He has gained significant exposure in working with employers in sourcing staff as well as assisting jobseekers in promoting and marketing themselves to employers and securing sustainable employment outcomes. He is currently working in Disability Employment Services where he assists clients with mental health disabilities in finding and keeping satisfying and gainful employment and helping them overcome and work around barriers to employment. 

He has helped many job seekers secure employment by training and coaching them in the art of being interviewed and giving the interviewer a positive and lasting impression. He knows how to sell and market a job seeker to an employer and he imparts this knowledge to his clients in helping them sell and market themselves in an interview.

This article can be viewed by clicking here

The 5 signs of a quality build CV, by Matthew Coppola

As it gets harder and harder to secure employment and stand out from other job candidates, it is becoming increasingly important to have a powerful resume that really sells and markets your skills and abilities to prospective employers.


As it gets harder and harder to secure employment and stand out from other job candidates, it is becoming increasingly important to have a powerful resume that really sells and markets your skills and abilities to prospective employers.

Here are 5 signs of what makes a quality CV:

1. It is specific

Is your resume effectively marketing you toward one particular type of industry or role? Or does your CV have little direction about what career you are heading towards and how you define yourself in your field?

2. It is well written and structured. 

The CV must flow and be readable. Employers have limited time reading your resume so you want to make sure that it has clear headings, bullet points, and is in order from your name to the selling summary then competencies and your education and training and so forth.

3. It expands on your skills and experience and clearly outlines your success. 

Mention some of your notable achievements both at work/school. If you have recently graduated, make sure that the CV reflects the grades you achieved and some successful projects you completed. A brief summary will be sufficient.

For every job role, make a list underneath it of your achievements with that employer/in that position.

4. It is readable.

Does it sound clear to you when your read it aloud? Does it make sense? This is important. You want to impress the person looking at your CV with your exceptional skills in your attention to detail.

5. It is personalised.

Make sure that it is tailored for the positions that you are applying for. Use key words employers in the industry are looking for and make sure that your CV is a good reflection of what is best practice/desirable in the industry.

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Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions

For information on professional CV writing services, please visit http://www.clientcentric.com.au/#!resume-writing-services/ck40

You can also view this article by clicking here

Should I put my referee’s contact details on my resume or not?


Recently I was asked by a client what is best practice,when it comes to putting the contact details of their referees, on their resume. Some argue that if you do include their phone number, the prospective employer may call them without you knowing and catch the referee person off guard. Some feel that it might cause “bad feelings” and put off the referee from ever in the future providing advice. Well it really is a personal preference but when I write resumes for my clients, I do include the contact details and phone numbers but have an asterix (*) after the referees which says:

*Please advise me first before making contact.

From past experience in communication with employers, I feel that it can be annoying for them if they have to ask you for the contact number, then the time that takes can be consuming, especially if you don’t have their contact details on hand right away. So by having the details and that asterix, it allows the employer to make that quick confirmation call, allows you to quickly advise your referees and the reference call is made as soon as possible!

I have a video on-line entitled: “Should I have referees available upon request” and this can be viewed by clicking here

If you are interested in having a new resume written, assistance with responding to key selection criteria, I welcome you to visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au