How many examples should I include in my selection criteria?


Generally speaking, one to two examples is great to include in a selection criteria response. Two the better, but it’s always best to give at least one example. If you can fit in three examples then great, but it may make the response quite lengthy.

The best thing to do it is to be mindful of the person who may be reading your application.

An example of a typical response to a key selection criterion can be viewed by clicking on the below link: https://www.clientcentric.com.au/selection-criteria-writing

 

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Are you applying for a role which has key selection criteria to be addressed and would like assistance with this?

Client Centric Executive Employment Solutions is an Australian based business that assists with CV/Resume writingaddressing key selection criteria and covering letters to help you with giving your best foot forward to an employer. Please feel free to visit their website: www.clientcentric.com.au

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Why we feel nervous on the first day of a new job, by Matthew Coppola



Yesterday I started my first day on the job at a job find company in Victoria. Although it was only an internal transfer for the same position with the same company, I still felt nervous, timid and shy around my new fellow colleagues. I understand now just what its like for my job seekers when they start a new job. The emotions that they would be going through and how hard it can be to get back into the workforce especially if they have been out of work for quite some time. It is a big change and can be a stressful period in ones life.  Similar to the emotions involved in moving houses, changing jobs is just as stressful, if not worse. But why is it that we feel nervous on the first day on the job?

There are number of reasons why we feel nervous on the first day of our new job. Even today I had first hand experience with what it felt like to start working in a new office with new coworkers I have never met before until today. It was extremely nerve racking. I made the biggest mistake in the beginning. I accidentally arrived to work late and so I was stressed in the morning to begin with. I now see why it is extremely important to go visit the new workplace before a job start, say the day before, so then in the morning you wont be stressed and will know exactly how long it will take to get to work and where to park. But thankfully I soon forgot about being late after apologizing and explaining my reason why. I was also nervous because everyone knew eachother and they had built up this team culture and felt so comfortable around eachother. But I realized that they werent going to change to fit in with me. I had to change to fit in with them. I made sure that I introduced myself to everyone in the office and that I joined in with conversation and laughter the team were having. Because I made the effort to be part of their team culture, they made the effort to warmly welcome me.

Then by the end of the day it struck me! I finally realized why we always feel nervous when starting a new job. Its because it means change for us and moving away from what we are familiar with. In Psychology, we learn that the brain loves the familiar. When we move out of our comfort zone it can create a real shock to our brain. For instance, why is it that we always feel comfortable in our own bed then in someone else? And its for that very reason. So to really overcome the tensions and anxieties in starting a new job, we need to make an earnest effort to get to know our fellow colleagues and show interest in the workplace environment and culture.

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Author: Matthew Coppola, Managing Director of Client Centric.

Client Centric – Executive Employment Solutions are a boutique employment services company specialising in executive and managerial level roles. We are committed to helping you succeed in your career and to do this we have the best staff on board to help you reach your goals. Our team are highly experienced and knowledgeable in a broad range of areas and expertise, so you get the best advice. We service clients all over Australia including Perth, Brisbane, Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and Hobart.  We provide Resume Writing ServicesCover Letter WritingLinkedIn ProfilesAddressing Selection Criteria’s and we also offer a Job Application Service where we apply for jobs on your behalf and all you do is wait for the call. Please visit our website at www.clientcentric.com.au to find out more.

Why you need to be passionate about your job to succeed, by Matthew Coppola



I have been working for an employment services organisation for over 7 months now, and just recently I was offered an internal transfer to another office within the company over in Melbourne. But to ensure that my transition is as smooth as possible, in the last week working at my previous office in Perth, I had another employee who would be taking over my role to job shadow me. I thought this would be easy and I could teach someone the best of everything I knew, but how wrong was I.

The person job shadowing me had absolutely no interest what so ever in the job and the industry. It wasnt that they told me they werent interested, it was in their body language and the actions they made which made me come to the conclusion they werent interested in the job and hence would’nt perform once in the job.

Ill give you a bit of background about my job. I am an employment consultant for a Job Services Australia organisation. When a job seekers goes on welfare benefits, they are referred to a Job Services Australia organisation. My job is to reverse market job seekers based on their skills and experience, to suitable businesses, so then they can go off Centrelink benefits. Like most jobs, I have Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) to meet. So you need to have self-discipline and personal drive so that you can place as many job seekers into employment and meet your KPI’s.

When I first started in this job, I was really passionate about placing people into employment. I also had the added pressure of meeting my KPI’s but I knew that placements would come after regular and quality reverse marketing. What has driven me to succeed is passion, dedication, self-discipline and just simply enjoying my job. Plus I want my career to stay in recruitment. But when I had this person job shadow me, she displayed none of those traits. Sure, she doesnt necessarily have to enjoy her job, but at least show some interest in the job.

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I am an experienced and qualified Employment Consultant. I provide assistance with tailored professional resumes, customised cover letters, key selection criteria responses and keyword optimised LinkedIn profiles.

All of my work is not only professionally written and edited but also has a unique design,  making sure that your job application will stand out from the rest. I work with clients all across Australia including Perth, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Darwin, Hobart and Adelaide. Having a professionally written resume will ensure your CV stays ahead of the rest. Contact me today to find out how I can help you land your dream job.

Please feel free to email me at info@matthewcoppola.com or call me on 0415 559 233.

Why It Pays To Be Honest In Sales By Matthew Coppola


To many business people, the belief is that honesty pays, but not enough. To survive in the cut throat world of business and sales, many feel that they need to lie or bend the truth to get anywhere in business.But is that the case? Does being deceitful, dishonest and untruthful in sales and business really the answer to gaining success? In this article I am not just referring to small amounts of dishonesty or bending the truth, I am talking about all types and degrees of dishonesty no matter how big or small they are.There is no such thing as a white lie. A lie is a lie.
Any type of dishonesty is created by greed for dishonest gain. Greed leads many business owners and sales people to lie. But you may justify by reasoning that “its business” and “business is business”. Many sales people even put the responsibility back on to the customer, saying that its the customers end decision and “let the buyer beware”.

But, can a theif justify his robbery by saying “let the victims beware”? Of course not! Same with in sales. If a salesperson is dishonest and makes a sale, they are just as bad as that theif. Both the thief and the salesperson have been dishonest.

The theif is dishonest by taking someones possessions without their permission and not telling them. The salesperson is dishonest because they sold the customer a product and not told them the truth about the product. The salesperson sold the product knowing all too well that if the customer knew the truth, they would not have bought the product in the first place.

Yes, honesty in business and sales may require greater time and hard work, but the satisfaction and joy from honesty and truthfullness far outweigh that from dishonesty!

But is this view realistic? Can salespeople who need to meet weekly targets follow it? Well yes they can! To illustrate, lets use an example of an employment placement coach whose job it is to place all types of people into employment, even those who are not the most preferred people to employ.

When you are advocating a candidate for a job, you may find it pays to be honest and upfront with the employer in the beginning. If you hide the negative points about a job seeker and just focus on whats good about them, the employer will be trying to evaluate them and the reasons as to why they are unemployed.

Not only that, but if they actually get the job and their negative side is seen by the employer, it will not only affect the security of their employment but also affect the employers view of you and any other candidate you recommend to the employer in the future.

An Explanation Of Generation Y By Matthew Coppola


OMG. IM ROFLMAO ATM. BTW I G2G but ill BRB.If your not up with the lingo I just said Oh my goodness. Im Rollling over Laughing my ass off. I got to go but ill be right back. Today im going to be talking about the generation that talks like that.Known for their optimistic attitudes, aspirations for higher education, ability to work collaboratively, their open-mindedness, and drive, Generation Y are here. And they are making a statement.They are tech-savvy, travel-mad, self-absorbed, peer-pressured, celebrity-obsessed, Facebook-compulsive, iPod-wearing, brand-conscious 20-somethings who live with their parents and show no loyalty to their employer THEY’RE supposed to be hip, smart-talking, and sometimes seem to suffer from an overdose of self esteem. With a BlackBerry in one hand, half-caf latte in the other and an iPod-plugged earphones surgically attached to ears, they are ambitious, demanding and apparently born to rule. Right now!They are Generation Y and there are more than four and a half million of them in Australia.

You could also call them the internet generation, echo boomers, igeneration, the mypod generation or the millinials. They have become almost a household name!

The exact years are a subject of debate however I can provide some insight into the reason why Generation Y do what they do.

Now if another Generation provided this information it may be how they are viewed from the outside. Today I would like to give you some of the inside scoop for Gen Y.

So what makes them tick? How do we recruit them? More importantly, how do we retain them?

Firstly well look at what factors influence this generation, so we understand where they are coming from.

COMPARING GENERATIONS

Baby Boomers were influenced by the dawn of the TV, Rock and Roll, the Cold War, Vietnam War, the danger of nuclear war. Xers saw the Personal Computer, AIDS, single parent families, the growth in multiculturalism, and the downsizing of companies.

Gen Y have lived through the age of the internet, cable television, globalisation, September 11 and environmentalism

PEER PRESSURE

Unlike previous generations before them, peer pressure has become a major influence on Gen Y.
They wont listen to the media and are less likely to listen to their parents. But they will listen to their friends.

Unlike the pen-pal relationship that teens of the 1970s enjoyed, Gen Y no longer need to wait for letters in transit.

Gen Y are also communicating with one another using different communication mediums than previous generations. Instant messaging technologies and mobile phones have become very popular with Gen Y.

Online communication affords instant gratification for the users involved. Messages appear on the screen mere seconds after they are posted, allowing conversation-style communication between friends.

TECHNOLOGY

Ask any Gen Y What/who has a lot of influence on your thinking and behaviour? and most of them will likely say TV and movies.

Research shows that Aussie teenagers are now spending more time watching TV today then compared to four years ago, up from 2 hours 16 minutes per day to 2 hours and 20 minutes, a growth of 3.6%.

In addition to the growing Internet and video games use, they are now approaching 4 hours screen time per day.

Ease of access to a computer with internet connection and portable devices such as IPhones which can connect to the internet mean that Gen Y spend a great deal of time online and on social networking mediums such as facebook.

SOCIAL, ECONOMIC & POLITICAL CONDITIONS

Gen Y have also experienced different economic, social and political conditions than previous generations. Before the financial crisis occurred, most Aussie gen Ys had no idea what impact a recession has on society.
Which partly explains why most of Gen Y are still living at home.

Although they are the most materially endowed, and entertained generation of teenagers ever, they have been seriously affected by the economic climate.

Economic crises, including the dot-com bubble in 2000, and the United States housing bubble that resulted in the financial crisis have made paying any rent, hard for this generation riddled with high unemployment levels.

Theyve also seen the costs of their parents success in terms of broken marriages, absentee parenting, and an epidemic of stress related illnesses.

Does money make us more happier?


An assumption in Economics is that consumers prefer more, and that one’s utility can be increased through the consumption of more goods and services. In other words, the more money we have as individuals, the more satisfied we are with our life. But does greater income and consumption really translate into greater happiness? Three main research studies are examined, with offer similiar yet different answers.

In one study, an ordinal scale for happiness was derived from answering the question: “taken all together, how would you say things are these days – would you say that you are very happy (score of 3), pretty happy (2), or not too happy (3)?” (Davis, Smith & Marsden, 2001) For 1994-1996, the mean happiness score was 1.92 for those in the lowest 10% of the income distribution, and 2.36 for those in the highest 10% income distribution. This study showed that there is a positive relationship between utility and income.

In the World Values Survey, cross-country comparisons were made to view this relationship on a global scale. In this case, income was measured by each 51 country’s per-capita gross national product (GNP) as measured in US Dollars. The question asked to all respondents: “all things considered, how satisfied are you with your life as a whole these days?” the scale was 1 representing most dissatisfied and 10 most satisfied (ICPSR 2000). Graphical analysis showed that countries with higher GNP per capita on average, experience higher satisfaction. However this satisfaction increases at a lower rate, reflecting diminishing utility as material well being increases (Davis, Smith & Marsden, 2001).

The researchers concluded that there are other factors which affect satisfaction levels, such as health, the political environment, freedom etc. For example individuals with high income levels, but poor health were less happy, then those with better health. Countries with high incomes, yet strict government control had less happier individuals then those countries with less control (People in North Korea can testify to this!) Although researchers still agree that greater happiness results from greater utility, on average that is.

However, Princeton University Researchers have found that the link between income and happiness is “greatly exaggerated and mostly an illusion” (Quinones 2006). Their new fndings build on efforts to develp alternative methods of gauging the well being of individuals and of society, as it became apparent that people surveyed in a new study about their own happiness were overstating the impact of income on their wellbeing.

Although income is a good measure of well being, its role is low and less important then first thought. People with greater incomes do not necessarily spend a greater amount of time doing enjoyable activities (Quinones 2006) In economics it is assumed that the rational consumer will increase their level of consumption for luxury goods and services, due to their higher level of disposable income and will be more satisfied. But in reality, higher income individuals are “barely happier than others in moment-to-moment experience” and tend to be tenser.

New measures adopted are based on individuals ratings of their actual experiences, instead of a judgement of their lives as a whole. The Day Reconstruction Method (DRM) measures peoples quality of daily life. This creates an “enjoyment scale” by requiring people to record the previous days activities and describe their feelings about the experiences. The method has proved effective.

For example, when people were asked to describe their general happines and then asked how many dates they had in the past month, their answers showed little correlation. But when the order of the questions was the opposite for another group, the link between their love lives and general happiness became much greater. This is in line with the finding from the World Values Surveys.

So far three studies have been examined. The first study concluded that there is a positive relationship between income and happiness, the second looked at this relationship on a global scale, still indicating a positive relationship, but discovering the presence of diminishing utility with income, and concludes that there are other factors at play. The last study makes a revision of past research then it conducts its own study. The researchers concluded that this positive relationship has been very much exaggerated and criticize the integrity of past surveys. Whilst they acknowledge that there is a positive relationship, there are still many other factors at play and only to a small extent, is income positively related to happiness, thus agreeing with the other two studies.